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TWENTY-FOUR PAGES. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 




Entered as second-class matter December 22, 1905, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



VARIETY 






DUNDY STOOD BY THOMPSON. 

The disruption in the Hippodrome man- 
agement has not occurred since Fred 
Thompson's return from London, for the 
simple reason that Elmer Dundy declined 
to throw his partner, Fred Thompson, 
even at the instigation of so important 
a personage as .lames Still man. president 
of the National City Bank, who was 
backed up in his demand that Dundy sever 
business relations with Thompson ■ by 
John W. (Slates and Harry S. Black of the 
Fuller Construction Company, the two 
other moneyed men of the enterprise. 

Elmer S. Dundy's father was a close per-* 
sonal friend of Mr. Stillman and the finan- 
cial backing which Dundy has been en- 
abled to command was originally based on 
that. While Thompson was in London 
Dundy was asked by Stillman to "let Fred 
out." Dundy replied that they had risen 
together and they would stick together. 

Mr. Stillman, urged on by dates, who 
dislikes Mr. Thompson's whole souled 
style of making a production, dreamed 
not that Dundy would disobey him, and 
again broached the subject the day after 
Thompson's arrival. He was resolutely 
turned down by Dundy on the proposi- 
tion, and while Gates fumed and swore, 
nothing could be done, for Stillman clings 
to the partners, throwing the weight of 
his power in the Hippodrome Company to 
their support, although to quiet, Mr. Gates 
he likewise insisted that the expendi- 
tures hereafter must l>e more circumspect. 



"A SOCIETY CIRCUS" UNDER CANVAS. 

The Hippodrome production of "A So- 
ciety Circus" may go out on the road after 
the closing of the big theatre, playing as 
an adjunct to a circus, giving a spectacu- 
lar first part under canvas on the order 
of Kiralfy's "Nero," which had a tent 
season or two. 



FLORENCE ROBERTS AT THE SAVOY. 

It is possible that through present ne- 
gotiations the Florence Roberts Dramatic 
Company under the management of John 
Cort will play at the Savoy Theatre, 
jumping direct from San Francisco at the 
close of its engagement there on March 
10. 



KATIE BARRY SINGLE AGAIN. 

As a single entertainer once more Katie 
Barry will next appear. This condition 
was generally insisted upon by managers 
and Miss Parry will accede to their de- 
sire. Rooking has been secured by M. S. 
Bentham. 



KEITH IN WHEELING. 

Keith has a new house in fact or in 
sight in Wheeling, W. Va. D. F. Hen- 
nessy says he believes it is true, for ho 
read it somewhere. 



NEW HOUSE FOR EASTERN. 
Norfolk, Va., will have a new burlesque 
theatre next season to be operated by the 
Columbia Circuit (Eastern Wheel). 



NO N. Y. "HIP" FOR LONDON. 

The site desired by Thompson & Dundy 
in London for a Hippodrome on the lines 
of their building here could not be ob- 
tained and the project has fallen through. 
The spot selected was a leasehold, and 
English influence was necessary but could 
not be obtained. 



JO PAIGE SMITH WITH KEITH. 

Rather a little firecracker was exploded 
the early part of the week when it be- 
came known that Jo Paige Smith, the 
vaudeville agent, was once again in the 
Keith fold. 

At tin* time Mr. Smith seceded from the 
Keith arm v. anil with Milton Aborn or- 
ga nixed the Equitable Booking Agency. 
taking alone several managers who had 
formerly booked through the Keith 
offices, that proceeding practically marking 
the lini-h ol the old ••Association.*' both K. 
K. Albee and B. V. Keith vowed, with 
variations, that "do Paige Smith will 
never return to the Keith employ," Mr. 
Albee having been particularly vehement 
OH the subject. 

Since the dissolving of the Equitable Mr. 
Smith has been associated with A. M. 
Bruggemann, who has houses in Hoboken 
and Paterton. As previously reported in 
variety, an unsuccessful effort was made by 
the Keith people to induce Bruggemann to 
build a house in Jersey City, and also 
book through their office. 

No alternative presenting, negotiations 
were entered into and closed with Mr. 
Smith in the hope that the Bruggemann 
the.it res will be corralled. There may also 
1k» another reason which will develop. 

Jo Paige Smith is a valuable man for 
Keith, and is badly needed at present. 



COLE AND JOHNSON TO LONDON. 

When Cole and Johnson, the colored en- 
tertainers and song writers, appeared las, 
at the Palace in London thev were fan 
»ied by a prominent member of Parlia- 
ment ami a Scotch distiller of whiskey, 
who told them if a suitable play could 
be secured the financial backing would be 
furnished. 

Bob Cole has been steadily at work 
since and now "The Shoo-Fly Regiment" 
will be presented in London next fall, 
the company to include most of the for- 
mer original members of the "Memphis 
Students." Ix-sides Abbie Mitchell and 
George Marion Cook. 

Col. and Johnson return to England 
in May next to fulfil contracted time for 
a return engagement at the Palace. They 
will continue to be under the direction of 
M. S. Bentham. 



BESSIE CLAYTON WILL RETURN. 
Bessie Clayton, who has been resting at 
her home in Long Branch for a month past 
with her husband. Julian Mitchell, who 
look the opportunity for a vacation on his 
own account at the same place, will return 
io vaudeville shortly. Myers & Keller 
announce that Miss Clayton will open 
March 12 at the Majestic in Chicago pre 
liminary to a trip over the Kohl & Castle 
circuit. 



PLUNKETT FOR HIMSELF. 

lames E. Plunkett, who has been con- 
nected with the firm of Myers & Keller, 
will go into the agency business himself, 
having formed a partnership with Felix 
Reich, the firm to be know as the Felix 
Reich Amusement Co., James E. Plunkett. 
general manager. 

Several new vaudeville houses have been 
secured by the firm for which thev will 
book, as well as for summer parks and 
fair*. Big acts will be handled, and the 
"AW* will be in the St. Jamea Building. 



RATHER SMALL. 

Gus Edwards' Schoolboys and School- 
girls opened at P. F. Sheedy's Fall River 
(Mass.) theatre last Mondav afternoon 
Through delay in the transportation the 
baggage did not arrive in time to allow 
the young people engaged in the act to 

appear in costume and they went on in 
>tieet <dothes. The reception received was 
one lessened through the unavoidable cir- 
cumstance, but Mr. Sheedy thought it wa* 
a nice soft spot to pick up a little easy 
money, and informed the manager of the 
act that $50 would be deducted from the 
week's salarv. 



FISCHER MAY LEAVE MARINELLI. 

* A definite rumor has been in circulation 
throughout the week that Clifford G. 
Fischer will resign as the American rep- 
resentative of H. B. Marinelli, the inter- 
national vaudeville agent, casting his lot in 
a like booking capacity with the Thompson 
and Dundy firm. 

Mr. Fischer recently sailed over and 
back across* the big pond with Fred 
Thompson, and negotiations have been in 
progress since their arrival home. 

If Mr. Fischer should conclude to leave 
the present Marinelli office in the St. James 
Building it is understood that one of the 
foreign representatives will be installed 
over here in his place, but not E. Wol- 
heim, as had been reported. Mr. Wolheim 
was in charge during Mr. Fischer's ab- 
sence, returning to Paris about ten days 
ago. 



AN IMPORTANT DECISION. 

Lawrence, Mass., March 2. — A railroad 
company receiving notice that theatrical 
effects shipped by it must be on hand at 
the destination for the advertised perform- 
ance is liable in damages for the gros9 
earnings of the property, less the expense 
of its use. for any delay in its shipment 
and delivery, according to a decision passed 
down by the full bench of the Massachu- 
setts Supreme Court. Monday, February 
20, in the case of Charles K. Weston of 
Lawrence against the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company. 



PAUL LINCKE COMING. 

The eminent German composer, Pan! 
Lincke, will arrive here some time during 
the month. He has engagements in view. 



THE AMPHION TO GIVE UP VAUDE 

VILLE. 

William T. Grover'e Ainphioti Theatie 

in the Williamsburg part of Brooklyn is 
understood to have been leased for the 
benefit of Charles R, Blanev. the melo- 
dramatic producer, who will assume 
charge next Fall, therohv removing it 
from the vaudeville world for the time 
being. 

Mr. Grovcr's least- of the house expires 
with the present season. 



LOWELL LAPSED. 

The Keith sub station in Lowell has de- 
cided that vaudeville is too much of a 
good thing. Tt closed la*f week. 



AL SUTHERLAND, LEGITIMATE 
MANAGER. 

Neil Burgess in "The County Fair" is 
going on tour once again with David Tow- 
ers and Al Sutherland (the vaudeville 
agent) as the managers. One night stands 
only will be played. 



QUIET SUNDAYS FOR LOUISVILLE. 

Louisville, March 2. 

Sabbath concerts for Louisville received 
a bump here when arrests were made of all 
ails appearing last Sunday. 

Tile artists were held in bonds of *."•• 
each, and the ticket seller*, doorkeepers, 
*t nice • ai '|ien:e,-s ami managers were iImi 
nla< I'd u M der restraint. 

The eh'urch is backing up the munieipj.l 
authorities, aid regular bills will not be 
I'ivs; ated for some time at least. 



ACTORS ORGANIZE. 

Organizer Harry W. Morton of the Ac 
tors' National Protective Union of Amer- 
ica has added a new body of actors and 
actresses to the ranks, which will be 
known as Actors' Union Local No. 2 of 
Brooklyn. Meetings are held Thuirsdav 
afternoons in the Amphion Theatre Build 
ing. Brooklyn borough. The annual 
entertainment and ball of the Actors' Na- 
tional Protective Union Local No. 1 of 
New York will take place at (Jrand Cen- 
tral Palace in April. 



JOE WEBER FOR THE ROAD. 

The Joe Weber Company, now playing 
at his Broad wav house, will have a road 
tour this season, probably leaving New 
York around Mav 1. 

w 



STOP AT DENVER. 

The Empire Circuit (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) have about decided that next sea- * 
son no house will be played west of Den- 
ver. The long jumps after that point 
have proven too expensive. 



TAKES WIFE'S NAME. " J 

Tommy O'Brien, whose wife, Clara 
Havel, was buried last week, has decided 
to be known in future as Thomas O'Brien 
Havel, thus perpetuating her name. He 
will still be assisted bv EfTic Lawrence. 



ANOTHER CIRCUIT, MAYBE. 

The Staimu h-Xewell people, who are re- 
sponsible lor the new Mount Vernon House. 
threaten to branch out and establish a real 
circuit of their own in this vicinity. The 
latest report is that they have secured con 
lio] of a theatie in Newark. N. J., and 
will presently open it as a low priced house 
with the l>o\ seats selling at 50 cents, the 
ie>t of the house in proportion. 



MORE SPACE FOR LEVY. 

.lack Levy has added another acre or uo 
io hi* suite in Forty-second street. The 
additional offices are lieing used by Freil 
Walton during the time of preparation for 
his coming debut in the American vaude 
ville field. When Walton is well launched 
Levy will again take possession. 



DEFRECE AN ENGLISH MANAGER. 

Walter de Frece. the husband of Vesta 
Tilley, whose next American tour will 
probaby be her farewell, is the general 
manager of a circuit of nine vaudeville 
theatres in Great Britain, embracing the 
Palace, Manchester; Palace, Belfast; Hip 
podrome, Bascombe; Hippodrome, South 
ampton; Hippodrome, Chargate Park. 
Tivoli. Palace and Paddington, Liverpool 
and Hippodrome, Portsmouth. The main 
office of the circuit is at 178 Charing Cro« i 
Boad, London. 



' 



VARIETY 



VARIETY 

A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published ev»-ry Saturday by 
TH8 VARIETY l'UBUSniNG CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
1402 Broadway, New York City. 



8IME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 

Entered as second -class natter December 
12, 1905, at the post office at Sew York, N. I .. 
under the act of t'onyrcss of March 8, 1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

A ii I) lift I ••■••■••••••• •■••••• ..,•..... 9* 

I* t*l **1 JJIl Mill (II (|f lilt (• llMM l,M (IIIIIMlMM *■ 

Six uikI three iiiontlis In proportion. 
Single roph-8 five cents. 

Variety will be mulled to a permanent address 
or aa per route, aa desired. 

Copyright UMKi by Variety Publishing Co. 
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION. 



First Year. 



No. 12. 



VARIETY announces "fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. That's 
VARIETY. 

Mike Whallen is bark in London playing 
three houses. 



Cooper and Robinson arc scheduled to 
sail for Europe May 15. 



The Four Olifans will join the Ilagen 
beck show for this summer. 



The statement is made that B. F. Keith 
clears at least $500,000 yearly. 



The City Girls are playing at Proctor's 
Twenty-third Street Theatre this week. 



The Orunatha troupe of seven people 
will again play the Barnum-Bailey circus 
this season. 



Pete Dailey will enter vaudeville again 
as soon as time is secured for him by 
•Jack Levy. 



The editor of an English dramatic 
paper, the Encore, died recently of pneu- 
monia at the age of 27 years. 



George S. (Juliette and Olive Carr were 
married about a month ago at the Metro- 
politan Hotel by Alderman Smith. 



The II*mgler sisters, who have been fill- 
tag date*- in the West for some months, 
will return to this vicinity presently. 







• 



-'-, iLj , fc^ 4 , JLO^. 









1 







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l/#£Asy V*# TAf£ H FAD T HAT 









ttube Bernstein is still in advance of the 
Parisian Belles Burlesquers, regardless of 
all contradictory reports. 



this sketch for the first time over that 
circuit. 



Sam S. (lark, Jr., late of The Thor- 
oughbreds, has signed with the Jersey 
Lilies to go ahead of that show. 



Grace Cameron declined to appear at 
the Imperial last Monday, not being sat- 
isfled with the billing. Leona Thurber 
replaced her. 



Bay Bailey of Genaro and Bailey has 
tonsilitis, and Paterscn had to be canceled 
for this week by the team. 



May Boley, who has been booked for 
eight weeks in her act called "The Polly 
Girls" by M. S. Bcntham, opens at Troy 
Monday. 



is one of the funniest acts in vaudeville, 
hut still Byron is unable to secure a New 
York hearing. As a former burlesque 
comedian the impression seems prevalent 
among managers and agents that the act 
would not do in town, although it is 
claimed that it goes with a scream out- 
side. This is one of me reasons that the 
artists should organize and will be gone 
into thoroughly at some future time. 



Clayton White and Marie Stuart will 
appear at the New York Theatre to-mor- 
row (Sunday) night, the first outside Sun- 



Tlie Taming of the Beast," a new sketch 
in the varieties, is said to have Stella 



A CORRECTION. 

T^O correct a prevailing false impression, VARIETY 
announces that Mr. Epes W. Sargent (CHICOT) 
does not wholly or in part own or control this paper, 
directly or indirectly. 



Edward Butler, the father of James But- 
ler, who owns the Standard Theatre in 
St. Louis, met with a serious accident at 
Silver City, N. M., on February 21. He 
was thrown from a carriage, and this, 
coupled with an attack of lumbago, re- 
sulted critically. Attending physician*, 
however, state there is a possibility of re- 
covery, in which case Mr. Butler, Sr., will 
continue bis pleasure trip through Lower 
California. His ton-is the head of the 
Empire Burlesque Circuit. 



day date they have ever played. M. S. 
Mentham has been trying for two years 
to induce them to do so. but without success 
until latelv. 

The three Donali will open at Keith's 

Union Square Theatre in two weeks, 

mainly through the activity of H. H. Fei 
ber. the Keith foreign agent. 

The six Perri sisters join the Ringling 
Circus this week. B. Perri, the manager 
of the act, has staged for Ringling for sev 
eral vears. 

Julie Ring in "A Quiet Life" under the 
management of Al Sutherland will open 
on the Orpheum circuit shortly, playing 



IViinllv, "the prettiest girl in vaudeville," 
in ; t. A Passaic, N. J., paper printed the 
H notation. 



Leo Xino was booked for forty-eight 
wvks through the Keith Booking Agency, 
this being one of the foreign acts 
'•snatched*' by the Keith people hi their 
customary manner, Nino will not piny 
the time, however, having returned '* 
Paris last Thursday, where await him all 
i he engagements he can possibly (ill. Tip 

change in Mr. Nino's plans occurred short 

— » 

ly after Fischer of the Marinelli Agency re 
turned. 



Variety i^ threatened with a lawsuit. 
The elevator bov in the building at 15 
We.-t Thirtieth street, occupied by Fran- 
cis, Day .V: Hunter, the music publishers. 
Was alluded to as Smoke last week in 
this paper. Smoke says his name is .John 
Moddy :iikI Variety has no right to change 
hi-; name. He has instructed his attorney 
to institute an action to recover $.">0 for 
perversion of nouns and Mr. John Smoke 
Moddy declines to compromise. 



I/)uise Allen Collier will break in h"r 
revised and rejuvenated sketch, "A Wild 
Idea," in Ponghkeepsic nest week. Beside 
the ehnnges in the personnel of the coin- 
i • ; i • i \ ii new Indian song will he Intro- 
dived. The comedienne cannot blame the 
Ponshkecpsip date on any agent. S!ie 
booked it herself. 



Competent authorities have declared 
that Frank Byron in "The Dude Detective" 



'I lie employees of the William? houses 

.ides. 



.ire being diligently drilled as fire bri 



VARIETY 



Why the Vaudeville Artists 

of America Should Organize 



A PETTY PIECE OF SPITE. SOME ADVERTISING "AZ IZ. W 

When Ciitie Berzac arrived in this couuy' will Rogers, the lariat thrower, was en- 
gaged as the added attraction for the 



BY S1ME J. SILVERMAN. 



Air. bargent's article last week in this 
column gave a resume of attempted or- 
ganization in this country and tlie cause 
oi the White Kata' failure in its strike. 
1 lie White Rats as a body is atill in ex- 
istence, and although that should be the 
logical society to be enlarged and become 
the permanent organization of the artists, 
the present principles governing the lead- 
ers forbid it. 

The policy of the Rats has been changed 
since the strike. It is no longer aggres- 
sive, but passive, and the moving spirits 
believe in "headliners" only. There is an 
investment fund more considered than 
any other subject and it is enlarged weekly 
from the members who contend that as 
their organization is composed almost 
wholly oi feature acts, it can control any 
situation that arises did they desire to do 
so, as an attractive bill could not be put 
together without enlisting the services 
of one or more active Rats. 

The White Rats to-day is a benefit or- 
der conducted more on social than busi- 
ness principles in so far as the welfare of 
the artists at large is concerned. 

The Associated Vaudeville Artists of 
America is allied with a labor union and 
there have been so many rumors in the 
past regarding the management that it is 
out of the question. The vaudeville ar- 
tists of America have need of an organi- 
zation thoroughly independent, acting un- 
der its own orders solely and not subject 
to any control other than that duly ap- 
pointed by the members. 

Variety is not advocating organization 
for belligerent purposes. It does not be- 
lieve that anarchy should rule a business 
or profession or that lasting results may 
be obtained in that manner. The idea of 
a vaudeville artists' organization should 
be to command respect by numbers, by 
the unity and solidity of the society and 
the loyalty of the members. 

The present principles set forth by the 
White Rats will never perfect an organiza- 
tion of this character. 

There may be 'headliners" on the bill- 
ing and the stage, but there must be no 
star acts in an artists' organization. Big 
and little must belong to insure success, 
and "equality" is the motto for the lodge 
room. The smaller acts need protection 
far more than the larger and stronger 
ones. There must be a brotherhood and 
sisterhood among the professionals in the 
varieties. 

Were an association to be formed giving 
no recognition to the greater moss of the 
artists that organization would never de- 
velop sufficient strength to force equitable 
measures. 

It has been stated that the vaudeville 
artists as a whole will never organize as 
a unit; that there are too many petty 
jealousies among the artists themselves; 
that they will never be loyal to each 
other; that there are not enough business 
men among them. If any of these state- 
ments are correct they must be rectified 
by the artists themselves. 

Vaudeville has grown rapidly in the 
past few years. It is running away frorc 



those most intimately connected with it. 
Artists must bury all spite and leeiing 
against eacn oiner li tiiey are to keep m 
tne race and always at tne iront ready 
to maintain Uieir moral and legal rignts. 
An organization of tlie wnoie is for the 
benefit ol every one. 

'JLnoae who give the trend of events at- 
tention have observed the tightening ol 
the lines which govern the employment 
of artists in this country. 

The oilices where booking may be ob- 
tained are simmering down. At the pres- 
ent time an artist is afforded the alterna- 
tive of applying in four directions tor en- 
gagements oi any length. They are Will- 
lain Morris' oflice, the Keith Booking 
Agency, the Western Vaudeville Associa- 
tion in Chicago and the Sullivan -Considine 
chain of cheaper theatres. If booked 
through an "outside" agent the conditions 
remain the same. These cover practically 
the important vaudeville houses and cir- 
cuits oi the United States and Canada. 
The other or independent houses are not 
numerous enough or easy of access one 
to another to give continued time, al- 
lowing an artist to lirst accept an engage- 
ment where the word "opposition" may be 
raised, and he or she debarred from play- 
ing a considerably longer period over one 
of these circuits for that reason alone. 

The vaudeville managers will always 
attempt to secure artists as cheaply as 
possible. That is perfectly legitimate 
business. Supply governs demand, and 
demand governs the price. With the pres- 
ent narrow limitations in the ownership 
and booking lines there may be fights be- 
tween the managers, raising prices or 
creating an increased demand for a time, 
but business men never fight for long when 
the difference affects their bank ac- 
counts. 

They* have got together before and 
they always will. Self-preservation is the 
first law of nature whether for your 
health or your pocket. 

If the managers of this country ever 
complete an organization of their own, 
which is not altogether unlikely, but de- 
cidedly improbable for some time at least, 
they will have the artists entirely at their 
mercy unless the latter are in a like con- 
dition. If the manager*' union is formed 
(even though in the far future) and the 
artists are unprepared no artist will then 
dare work for organization among his 
brethren, for failure will mean the black- 
list forever. 

In the present condition organization 
would be comparatively easy, and more 
especially so when the managers realize 
that it is for no ulterior motive, but sim- 
ply for cooperation and self-protection. 

The theory that vaudeville artists are 
not business men is disproved daily. The 
artists are far superior to the "legitimate" 
actors in every sense as a rule, and the 
argument that the "legitimate" actors 
have never successfully organized or the 
citation of the White Rais failure have 
no bearing at the present Moment. 

The article in the next issue will be on 
The Booking System." 



try he deposited a bond signed by a rep 
i eseutative ol B. F. keiih with the customs 
authorities for the return of his animals 
used in the act he is now presenting. The 
giving of the bond waived the duty which 
he otherwise would have been required to 
pay. 

The bond expired and should have been 
renewed. Mr. Berzac through his attorney 
requested Keith to attend to it, the cus- 
toms laws requiring that the original sure- 
ty shall be the only one allowed to renew. 
Keith absolutely refused to do so. Mr. 
Berzac tendered tlie amount in cash to the 
government, but it was declined, not being 
allowable under the same laws, and Ber- 
zac was obliged to pay about $400 out o: 
his pocket as duty on the animals and 
implements of his act, all of which will re- 
turn to England with him. 

The amount paid is a total loss to him, 
and was so designed by Keith as a punish- 
ment for Berzac playing Poli's in Worces- 
ter, an opposition house to Keith's there. 

The Keith version of the affair, as given 
by I). F. Hennessy, is that "it's private 
business, anyway, and it's no damn busi- 
ness of anybody's," with a few more 
dashes. 



FLETCHER HAS SOMETHING NEW. 

Charles Leonard Fletcher returns to 
(own on Monday, opening at the Colonial, 
after a long tour of the West. Before 
leaving for London in June for a two years 
trip, Mr. Fletcher will produce over here 
his newest one -act scenic comedy, written 
expressly for him by Harry Jackson, en- 
titled "A Breeze from the West." 



SOMETHING NEW FOR MISS VAL- 
DARE. 

Bessie Valdare, the only woman mana- 
ger of a bicycle act, will have a new offer- 
ing next season, utilizing eight girls and a 
special drop. Miss Valdare esteems her 
idea so highly that she declines to give 
any information on the subject through 
fear of being forestalled, it is so catchy. 



sA 



GUS HILL WANTS POINTS. 

When Fred Karno's "Mumming Birds" 
played the Novelty Theatre in Brooklyn 
Alf Reeves, the manager, noticed a man 
taking the measurements of the special 
scenery and setting carried for the act. 

Mr. Reeves inquired what purpose he 
had, and was informed by the measurer 
that Gus Hill had told him to do so, as Mr. 
Hill wished to place a similar act in one 
of his burlesque companies. 

Mr. Reeves is consulting his attorneys 
about the matter. 



ROLAND WEST'S NEW ACT. 

A new playlet, employing eighteen peo- 
ple, has been written by Emmett Corri- 
gan, and will shortly be shown in vaude- 
ville with Roland West in the leading role. 



«♦' 



BACK AGAIN. 

Xi'lla Bergen will return to vaudeville on 
Hnmnierstein's Victoria Roof this summer, 
following her engagement in "King for a 
Day." Rehearsals for this musical comedy, 
which opens in Springfield, Mass., March 
12, are being held daily. Jeannette Lowrie, 
who has a part in the piece, was forced to 
cancel this week at the Imperial in order 
to attend the rehearsals. 



New York Stars Burlesque Company when 
it played the Casino Theatre in Philadcl 
phia. 

William McGuire of the theatre and 
Robert J. Cohen, the advance man of the 
show, put their heads together and evolve I 
the scheme of having a basket carriage 
drawn through the city by four "prop ' 
horses and followed by ten men with ban- 
ners announcing the engagement of Mr. 
Rogers, who followed behind on his 
bronco. 

The theatre was sold out for the week 
within three hours after the parade, an 
unusual happening in burlesque. 



TOM HEARN GOING HOME. 

Refusing several advantageous offers for 
future time iu vaudeville over here, Tom 
Hearn, "the lazy juggler," has determined 
to return home, and will sail on the St. 
Louis April 7. 

Perhaps Mr. Hearu's pretty little Eng 
lish wife influenced the decision. His 
absence will be very much regretted by 
those who can recognize and enjoy a 
hearty laugh upon meeting it. 



GOLDEN BACK TO LONDON. 

George Fuller Golden, the monologist, 
will return to London in June to play 
the Coliseum. Mr. Golden may stay on 
the other side for some time. 



LADIES' HOME JOURNAL, TOO. 

In this month's issue of the Ladies' 
Home Journal there is a column of jokes 
evidently contributed by a vaudeville ar- 
tist or patron. One of the best stories 
Sydney Grant now tells is among them, 
but Mr. Grant cannot cry wolf, for the 
best story he ever told (the "umbrellas") 
appeared in Harper's Magazine some 
months before he first sprung it. 



BAILEY IN TOWN. 

James A. Bailey, the circus king, is in 
town ready to pounce upon a big novelty 
for the coming season. The Barn inn - 
Bailey show will open as usual this month 
at the Madison Square Garden, playing 
the customary allotted time there. 



REMICK PAID. 

The wager between Will D. Cobb and 
Jerome H. Remick for a suit of clothes, 
for which at one time Cobb thought he 
would have rather a long wait through a 
misunderstanding of the terms of the bet, 
has been settled by Mr. Remick informing 
Mr. Cobb to order the clothes and charge 
the bill to him. 



CIRCUS FOLK GETTING TOGETHER. 

Dan S. Fischell of Barnum & Bailey's 
press staff, Harvey Haile, George Auger 
and Ernest Bommell will leave St. Louis 
on St. Patrick's day to join the circus at 
the Madison Square Garden. 



RICHARD GOLDEN BACK BUT DIF- 
FERENT. 

Richard Golden will return to vaude- 
ville under the tutelage of William L. 
Lykens, touring for ten weeks booked 
over the Williams, Proctor and Hammer- 
stein circuits. Mr. Golden will essay a 
monologue by way of departure. 



VARIETY 



AMATEUR NIGHT?" BACK! 

The Cherry sisters (Addle ami Effle) are 
agai 
reel 
Bijou Theatre (vaudeville) in Dubuque) 

la. They appeared in that place and broke 
all records lor business, also causing other 
furnishing of the house to be demol- 
ished. 



x ii«_- V.JJI.IIJI BiBii-ia (nuuic aim i^iur; uic 

^lin in vaudeville, having been resur/' 

cted by Manager .lake Rosenthal of the 
::„... fffk^i / i....:n..\ i ■ i\..i _» 



POPULAR MUSIC IN ENGLAND 



HOUDINI'S BROTHER COMING. 

M. S. Kent ham has been requested by 
Jennie Jacobs, the London vaudeville 
agent, to secure time over here for llar- 
^vvn, a brother of Harry lloudini, the jail 
breaker. 



VON BIENE IN STOCK. 

Through Al Sutherland an arrangement 
has been effected whereby August Von 
Biene, the 'cellist, will appear at Proctor's 
Fifth Avenue Theatre during the early 
part of May in his own piece called "The 
Musician's Romance." Mr. Von Biene 
will depart from these shores on May 2C. 



VAUDEVILLE BY MAIL. 

Al Sutherland, the agent in the St. 
lames Building, received the following 

letter Thursday: 

Fob. 25, 100(5. 
MR. ALBERT SUTHERLAND: 

Dear Sir — I am very much Interested In buck 
fencing; could you teach vaudeville by dmUI 
Yuurs truly, 

WILKES ANDREWS. 



MISS REDDING WILL CHANGE. 
Francesca Redding ii still playing "My 
Friend from Texas" in response to re- 
quests, but next season will make an 
elaborate production of a new playlet, 
"Wyoming." 



DON'T "KNOCK" CARELESSLY. 

In the absence of any other vaudeville 
house in Mount Vernon the New Orplieum 
Theatre opened in that town last Monday 
became the opposition to the Doric in 
Yonkers. And thereby hangs a tale. 

Kddie Keller, of the Myers-Keller linn, 
attended the opening performance, occupy- 
ing a box* jointly with Manager Zeigler of 
the Doric. ) N 

According to Keller, SZetgler did not know 
him, and unsuspicious, spent the early 
part of the evening "knocking" the bill. 
• Inst after intermission Zeigler satisfied 
himself by his run system that the audi- 
ence was largely "paper," and announced 
as much to hi^ companions in a very audi- 

* • 

hie voice. 

Suddenly Keller spoke up. addressing the 
world at large: 

"Well, 'his is decidedly a better bill 
than any I ever saw at t he Doric." 

It wa- then that ZeiglcT dropped. Re 
did a sprint out front and Asked who h\< 
unknown box companion was. Thev told 
him, and he didn't come back. 



It is fast becoming a condition that no 
foreign agent over here dare divulcre the 
name of any act secured until it actually 
boards the ship. In two notable cases 
whatever information leaks out is prompt- 
ly cabled to the other side, when an effort 
is made to "kidnap** in the usual manner. 



William Courtleigh. in "Under the Thirl 
Degree," playing for the first time this 
week in town at Proctor's Twenty-third 
Street Theatre, has been retained for the 
second week there. 



"It's vastly different in England,*' re- 
marked Frederick Day, the American rep- 
resentative of Francis, Day & Hunter, the 
largest and best known music publishers 
on the Continent. 

The linn has recently moved its New 
York olliee into new quarters at 15 West 
.'10th street, where Mr. Day, who is a son 
of David Day, a member of the firm, was 
found. The New York branch of the Lon- 
don publishing house has been established 
here for about eight months, and Mr. Day 
was asked to explain the conditions exist- 
ing on the other side and here relative to 
the music publishing business as he found 
them. 

Following up his first remark, Mr. Day 
continued: "We are not accustomed to 
this 'plugging' as you term it on the 
other side. Over here the publishers go 
to the artists and ask them to sing their 
songs, using persuasion of one kind or an- 
other. We never did that in London. 

"An English artist heard of a song 
thought to have a fair chance of success, 
and he would buy an interest in it. After 
trying it out, the song would be brought 
to us for publication. Sometimes we pur- 
chased it outright; other times published 
on a royalty basis, allowing ten per cent, 
of the marked price to the owners of the 
composition. 

"A song we publ^hed wa9 never 
'pushed.' The artist would hear of it and 
call on us. As a mater of fact, though 
some of the greatest song successes of Eng- 
land were not published for a long time 
after having been pronounced a hit. 

"English artists have been known to buy 
a song and after singing it successfully 
refuse to allow it to be published, pre- 
ferring to retain the sole singing rights. 

"Miss Ida Rene owns 'Rake's Progress,' 
and it has not been printed nor will Miss 
Rene allow that to be done. Phil Ray, 
who made a tremendous hit with "Let Her 
Drown,' kept the original manuscript for 
a long while before he brought it to us, 
singing the song meanwhile. 

"Fred Farle (son «f doe Tabrar, who 
wrote 'Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a Dow- 
wow') composed 'Seaweed,' one of the most 
popular songs ever run in London and the 
provinces, yet it was about a year ifter 
he first introduced it before Francis, Day 
& Hunter secured the publication rights, 
placing it in 'The Catch of the Season,' 
where it was sung by Fred Wright, Jr. 

"Many English artists write their own 
words and music, as in the case* <»f Harry 
Lander and Harry Rendell. 

"English artists are firmly set in this 
regard. They prefer to be known as the 
singer of a song, which builds a reputation 
for them, bringing fame and fortune. An 
example of this is Mi-s Vesta Victoria, 
who opened at the Colonial last week. 

"She gained a worldwide reputation 
with the famous songs 'Daddy Wouldn't 
Day Me a Dow-wow.' and 'Our Lodger's 
Such a Nice Young Man,' following up 
these hits while still in her early teens 
with •Grace Darling.* 

"Miss Victoria is singing now two im- 
mensely successful numbers, 'It's All Right 
in the Summertime' and 'Waiting »t the 
Church' or 'My Wife Won't Let Me.' The 
last named has a most humorous lyric an 1 
I'm "tire will become equally popular on 
thi> side through Miss Victoria's inimitable 
style." 
Mr. Pay has composed himself, and sev- 



eral light musical pieces produced abroad 
bear his nom de plume "Edward Montagu" 
on the title page. As an authority he was 
asked for an expression regarding the 
more ready reception of American ditties 
in England than the English songs in 
America. 

"It is the splendid lilt introduced in 
American melodies of the 'Rosy Rosy' and 
' Bedel ia' order, and then of course the 
syncopated touch of the inevitable rag- 
time gives added zest. 

"There is a peculiar catch to the English 
songs, which only an English artist 
can give, but your American melodies have 
become popularized through the advent of 
the colored professional people in England, 
and now the Britishers have the craze, in 
\ word, the English composer up to a few 
years ago wrote for the stage and sold his 
manuscript to the artist — the publishing 
end being a secondary consideration. But 
with the advent of the 'free' song— as 
worked in America, the English writer is 
already holding his own. 

"America is music mad, though, which 
is an important item. Over there we con- 
sider a song selling 100,000 copies a big 
hit. 'The Soldiers of the Queen,' which 
has never been equaled for the English 
multitude, sold 300,000 after two years on 
the market. I understand an American 
publisher doesn't esteem a sale of less than 
200.000 of one composition more than a* 
moderate 'hit,' and if I have been cor- 
rectly informed, a big popular success here 
sells from 000,000 to 1,000,000. It seems 
incredible and is indicative of what a popu- 
lar music loving race the Americans are. 
"I don't wish to compare royalty state- 
ments of the Engli-h and American 
writers. The remarks about sales cover 
that. I could scarcely believe that an 
American song writer received as much as 
$25,000 a year for his royalty alone, 
though, when I heard it. 

"Francis, Day & Hunter is the stand- 
ard firm of publishers in London. The 
English swear by us, and it is the inten- 
tion of the firm to place the most success- 
ful English numbers in this country. We 
shall adopt the American method of popu- 
larization, but do not intend to handle the 
British numbers exclusively. We have 
American writers connected with our New 
York branch, and have now a song written 
by Edward Madden, author of 'Blue Bell,' 
which we consider the peer of all marches. 
It is 'Coming Through the IVye, Jenny 
Mine.' 

"You may imagine it's a change from 
the dignified atmosphere of our London 
office to the hurlv-burlv hustle and bustle 
of the music publishing business in New 
York city," said Mr. Day, as he arose from 
running over the choruses of Miss Vic- 
his seat at the piano where he had been 
toria's songs. 8im€. 



Oh arm ion. the Parisian trapeae artist, 
styled the perfect woman, who was booked 
to play at the Colonial. Lawrence, the week 
uf February 10, is at present confined to 
her bed at a Lawrence hotel recovering 
from two operations. The second opera 
ti-tii followed a plucky attempt to finish 
the engagement. Her recovery is looked 
• | 'on as only a mutter of time. 



LONDON NOTES. 
The Englishmen are calling Morrii 
Cronln "the mysterious pantomimic jug- 
gler." 



Mason and Keeler in 'Hooked by Crook 
are playing a return date at the Palace. 



Oswald Stoll produced at the Coliseum 
a burlesque absurdity entitled "S'Xero; or, 
a Roman Bank Holiday.** Walter Slaugh- 
ter wrote the music, Roland Carse the 
lyrics and the book is by Chris Davis. 



Conn and Conrad are appearing in the 
West End for the first time. They go 



-ig- 



Arthur Playfair and Kate Cutler are 
appearing in "Hero and Heroine." 






"The Human Bullet" is the latest sensa- 
tion proposed for the Hippodrome. "The 
Bullet" will be propelled from a cannon 
weighing (5,000 pounds, erected on the dress 
circle hwel, to a trapeae 120 feet above the 
arena. A similar act you will remember 
was a circus feature in America years ago. 
W. W. Cole had it first, it is believed. 



Large salaries are still being paid to 
the legitimate as well as the music hall 
artists. Arthur Trayson will receive 
$1,000 weekly when he appears at the 
Royalty Theatre in the Spring, under the 
management of Gas-ton Maye by arrange- 
ment with Arthur Collins, who has Mr. 
Trayson under contract for the next four 
vears. 



May de Sousa, who is still over here, has 
been engaged to play the leading part in 
the next Christmas pantomime to be put 
on at the Drury Lane. The piece is at 
present under consideration. 



Miss Louise Taylor, for several seasons 
of the vaudeville act known as Adamini 
and Taylor, has dissolved her partnership 
with Mr. Ada mini and will shortly appear ' 
In a solo offering. 



Charles Boss, of Ross and Fenton, ap- 
peared at a benefit during the past week 
in a single turn, for the first time in 
twelve years. 



Louise Montrose will play a "home date" 
week of March 10 in the new Mount Ver- 
non vaudeville house. Mi.ss Montrose 
makes the suburban burg her home. 



The Theatrical Brotherhood at St. Louis 
gave their annual Mardi Gras carnival last 
Tuesday night (February 27). Over 10.000 
revellers attended. I. T. A. S. E. buttons 
were consph-uous. All members of shows 
playing St. Louis attended. 



"The Mascot Moth," which scored a 
dismal failure when it opened at the Co- 
lonial, will return next fall to play the 
Orpheum and Keith circuits. 



Brandon and Wiley will go to London 
soon, while Johnson and Wei la, another 
colored team, will open at Budapest. Both 
were bonked at the foreign halls by B. 
Obermayer. 



TM* has been the best seasofl of i*s 

career so far for the Howard Atheneum 
in Boston. 



Everhart, the hoop 'roller, is being heav- 
ily featured In the CJerraau speaking coun- 
tries he i.-; nOW playing. 



VARIETY 




William Courtleigh. 
"Under the Third Degree." 
Twenty-third Street 

The present time is opportune for a 
playlet of the description Mr. Courtleigh 
enters into vaudeville with. With an es- 
tablished reputation of having been one 
of the best leading men the legitimate 
stage in this country has produced, Mr. 
Courtleigh brings into vaudeville the 
consummate skill in the art of acting 
which raised him to the front rank. The 
wide range of characters Mr. Courtleigh 
has portrayed in his experience stands him 
in good stead in "Under the Third De- 
gree," which had its first New York pres- 
entation at Proctor's Twenty-third Street 
Theatre on Monday. The protean sketch 
is by Campbell McCulloch, whose knowl- 
edge of vaudeville wants is well defined 
and is proven in the playlet by the almost 
biographical rapidity of the action in 
which the several characters pass before 
the view of the audience. The sketch it- 
self is based upon the inquisitorial exami- 
nation founded in New York city under 
the regime of Thomas F. Byrnes, then 
Chief of Detectives, and commonly called 
the third degree. It is an Americanized 
version of "A Case of Arson," the char- 
acter curtain raiser which Henry de Vries 
brought into the varieties from the Madi- 
son Square Theatre, but Mr. McCulloch 
has so well disguised the several parts 
that even to those who have seen Mr. de 
Vries the interest is maintained by tha 
excellent acting of Mr. Courtleigh. He 
has seven distinct characterizations, each 
perfect in itself, and will stand compari- 
son with any protean artist, Mr. de Vries 
not excepted. His conceptions are lifelike 
in their reality and appeal to the finer 
senses as studied impersonations. 

The supporting cast is smothered 
through the fine makeup and forceful 
work of William Randall as an Inspector 
of Police. John Roache is a police or- 
derly and Charles Newton a detective 
sergeant, while Delfiah Bryant is Kate 
Warner, the wife of the accused, who is 
suspected of arson, and compels her hus- 
band to confess his crime in a very dra- 
matic finale. That if any is the one fault 
of the production ; it is overdramatically 
drawn. The sketch and the players re- 
ceived several curtain calls on the initial 
performance, Mr. Courtleigh's impersona- 
tions being broken into several times by 
involuntary applause. Vaudeville is most 
fortunate in gaining William Courtleigh 
and no manager need hesitate for an in- 
stant in booking "Under the Third De- 
gree" with him in it. * Sime. 




Harry Corson Clarke & Co. 

"Strategy." 

Orpheum. 

After an absence of a dozen years spent 
in the west Harry Corson Clarke made 
his reappearance at the Orpheum Theatre 
Monday in a twenty-five minute sketch 
in which he has the assistance of two per- 
sons whose names do not appear. The 
sketch is a familiar one in theme, being 
the outworking of the idea of a man mar- 
ried to a rich woman who invents a spuri- 
ous son for the purpose of obtaining 
money from his spouse. On his birth 
day she surprises him by declaring 
that she is going to adopt the boy 
legally and a friend from New York, put 
ting in an appearance just then, is passe. I 
off as the son until the schemer has time 



[ NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK J 



to find a better solution of his troubles. 
Jn the end he finds that an address given 
as that of his son develops the fact that 
the person (who is no acquaintance of his) 
is a fugitive from justice and so an es- 
cape is provided. The sketch is brisk and 
amusing, though on Monday a premature 
curtain cut off a couple of minutes 
from the climax. The woman assisting 
Mr. Clarke played very well. The 
man was apparently unable to make 
the most of the opportunities provided, 
3imply walking through a part which 
should have been played with spirit. 

Chicot. 




Charles £. Evans & Co. 

Sketch. 

Proctor's Fifth-eighth. 

Originally presented as a rather dreary 
evening's entertainment under the title of 
•There and Back," the theme of^'It's Up. 
to You, William" serves better as a twen- 
ty-five minute sketch and brought suc- 
cess to Charles E. Evans and his associates 
at the Fifty-eighth Street Monday after- 
noon. The story tells of two men who 
have made a trip together and are sup- 
posed to have taken passage on a ship 
which is believed to be lost. In reality 
they have been ofT on an entirely different 
excursion and coming home ignorant of 
the happenings of the past few weeks, find 
their wives in tears and widow's weeds. 
They build up an elaborate string of false- 
hoods to cover their deception, all of which 
tumble about their heads when the steam- 
ship company wires of the safe, if de- 
layed, arrival of the ship. There is little 
action to the piece, more than half of the 
time the two men standing in the center 
of the stage while their wives occupy 
seats at opposite sides, but there is a deal 
of fun in the lines and laughter is fre- 
quent. George Arliss, who is credited with 
the work, has not improved his literary 
reputation with this offering, but he has 
provided a useful vehicle. Charles 11. 
Hopper, Elizabeth Barry. Helena Phillips 
and June Marlowe gave competent sup- 
port. Chicot. 




Rigo. 

Alhambra. \A 

The Hungarian ex-husband of Clara 
Ward, who became the Princess Chimay 
after leaving her native home (Detroit) 
for foreign lands, appeared for the first 
time in America at the Alhambra Thea- 
tre in Harlem last Monday afternoon, 
surrounded by ten musicians, said to be 
countrymen of the gypsy, and who were 
brought over here for the sole purpose of 
playing their Hungarian instruments in 
accompaniment to Rigo's violin. Through 
an accident Rigo himself could not play, 
but directed his orchestra with one hand 
bound up. That mishap prevented a true 
criterion of the reception he would have 
received otherwise being taken. The ap- 
plause was quite light. Rigo being a bet- 
ter drawinsr card here as a freak than as 
n musician. Tn appearance he is squatty 
and looks unsainly in evening dress upon 
the stage. When smiling he is remindful 
of the simian. The music of the orches- 
tra is similar to that heard in restaurants 
having Hungarian orchestras, it having 



been remarked during the week that sev- 
eral of Rigo's assistants were secured 
from Second avenue, only two having been 
directly imported. If Rigo. dives up to 
published promises of the wonderful music 
he can produce personally he will be a hit. 

Sime. 




Alhe Gilbert and Her Six Summer Girls. 

Songs. 

Pastor's, 

Two changes and extra coats, inciden- 
tally three songs, comprise the offering of 
Allie Gilbert and her Six Summer Girls 
at Pastor's this week. The songs are not 
well chosen, and the girls have been given 
only the conventional business that, in 
view of the increasing number of girl acts, 
grows worse than tiresome. They are 
rather good looking, as girl acts go, and 
appear to be willing to take more trouble 
to be entertaining, but they are not per- 
mitted to work out, and the result is the 
commonplace. Some novelty of idea is de- 
manded these days, and fluffy dresses with 
a change to Indian costumes does not 
qualify under this classification. Miss Gil- 
bert, having spent money on costumes, 
should now go to some expense for a good 
stage manager. A really experienced man 
could do much for the act. The act needs 
it. Chicot. 




Cathrine Countiss. 
"Wedded by Wire." 
Imperial. 

Miss Countiss is billed as "late leading 
lady of the Imperial Stock Company," and 
as such is possibly depended to draw busi- 
ness which doesn't materialize. She ap- 
peared in a Haddon Chambers playlet the 
opening week of the Imperial Theatre in 
Brooklyn for vaudeville, but has not been 
heard from since that time until this week, 
when another sketch by Henry Gottschalk 
and George D. Parker is presented at the 
same house. The comedy vein is predomi- 
nant, brought out through the elopement of 
a young man with a widow. The cham- 
bermaid in a hotel, getting an inkling of 
the situation, knocks upon the door and 
demands $2 as a bribe. Here arises the 
highly momentous humorous situation. 
Only $1.08 can be raised to quiet the in- 
former, and a monkey attached to a hand 
organ is robbed of the necessary two cents. 
Another comical idea is to cut the rope 
which the organ grinder climbs to recover 
his "monk," after which a marriage cere- 
mony is performed over the telephone. 
Miss Countiss played the widow with 
elaborate modesty, especially as the set- 
ting displayed a fully dressed bed, and 
Robert Gaillard as the young man made 
no impression. Mr. McMahon was re- 
quired to wear a bathrobe only. The 
sketch is neither amusing nor well played. 

Sime. 



\ 



The Royal 
Musical Five. 
Keeney's. 

From t ho program announcement it is 
concluded that the four young men and 
one very youthful girl are members of a 
family party residing In Brooklyn. Re- 
gardless of whence they came, the act 
is destined for a hit in vaudeville if 



properly handled. They are receiving a 
great deal of applause this week at 
Keeney's, even without deliberation being 
shown in the offering. No brasses are 
used, a 'cello, two violins, piccolo and a 
pianist composing the musicians. The girl 
sings at the opening, a mistake easily rec- 
tified, not because she has no voice, for 
she possesses a pleasant one, which 
is used to much advantage in "Strolling" 
with the male members as the chorus 
in natty white suits. The young man's 
piccolo solo should be dropped and the final 
selection now used should be substituted 
for it, the finale to be the "Strolling" 
number, which is the prettiest effect of con- 
certed singing seen around town in a 
long while. Also the first overture should 
be given with the players not grouped to- 
gether. The patriotic addition to the 
musical finish is not required and did not 
aid in the applause. Any rearrangement 
will benefit, but the act as it is will please. 

Sime. 



Mr. and Mrs. Chas. S. Hammond. 
"Family Jars." / / 

Pastor's. \S % 

This is a sketch of the home made sort, 
the jars being the three canisters supposed 
to contain the ashes of the three previous 
victims of the feminine character's matri- 
monial adventures. They do not in the 
least resemble the containers used by cre- 
matories, but that is a detail as are the 
cans, for they crop up but twice, in the 
opening when they arouse the jealousy of 
the fourth husband and near the close 
where he throws the cans after his wife. 
In between there are dreary stretches of 
words. Neither of the players can acr. 
The woman is a weak copy of the wailing 
wife type and gains a couple of laughs by 
her pretended tears. The man does not 
even accomplish that much. He lacks dis- 
tinction of presence and performance, and 
the wonder is that he ever got on the stage. 

Chicot. 



\J 



Morris and Cramer. 
Songs and Dances. 
Keeney's. 

A team of blackface comedians who 
have been recruited from an "amateur" 
night at Keeney's Theatre, and given their 
opportunity as professionals at the theatre 
where they first "went on." Both are very 
young boys, and fair dancers, much better 
so than singers. One is a "comedian," but 
he would have hard work convincing any 
one of the truth of that. Their forte is 
dancing, whether in white or black face. 
Coon songs only may aid, but it is too 
early in their career to attempt comedy in 
seriousness. Time on the cheaper circuit 
should be procured, allowing chance for 
proper training before attempting tho 
larger houses. Sime. 




Charles Van Dyne and 

Laura Dean. 

"The Ambassador." 

Keeney's. 

Tli rough the management of Keeney's 
suggesting to Edward Sullivan and Com- 
pany in "A Woman's Way" that they 
might as well close last Monday instead 
of finishing the week out, Charles Van 
Dyne and Laura Deane replaced with "The 
Ambassador," a sketch allowing the songs 
and duets of the couple to be introduced. 
No information was obta'nable as to how 



VARIETY 



long the pair had been associated in this 
or other sketches, but the impression is that 
most of the singing had been heard in other 
settings through e'lher one or two of the 
present players. ''The Ambassador" has 
a plot based on "mistaken identity," Mr. 
Van Dyne costuming as a Japanese and 
Miss Deane during the playlet appearing 
as a Geisha girl, playing straight before 
that. There is some real comedy involved, 
particularly by Van Dyne, who does not 
strive for the grotesque or attempt 
dialect. Miss Deane added a liveliness 
which gave her added value, and the sketch, 
while not received uproariously, was well 
liked, particularly the well rendered "cat 
duet" at the finale, even though a standard 
number of many other acts. Sime. 



ARTISTS* FORUM 

"The Artists' Forum" Is for the artists exclusively. Any lust complaint any artist may 
have or considers he has will be printed In this department. Or any comment that an artist 
may desire to make. 

Also any artist or act that disagrees with a reviewer on Variety In his review of the artist's 
work or act may have his criticism of the criticism printed In this column, and it will be 
nswered by the reviewer. 

Confine your letters to 150 words and write on one side of paper only. 




OUT OF TOWN 

The Empire Girls. 
Singing and Dancing. 
Standard, St. Louis. 

This splendidly drilled corps of singers 
and dancers "do things." Not any more 
than the average American chorus girl is 
capable of, but more audacious. It teems 
with sensationalism bordering on the 
risque. They finish by lying on the stage 
and going through a series of voluptuous 
gyrations which in more sedate costumes 
could be construed as demonstrations of 
physical culture. The act did not meet 
with enthusiasm at its presentation with 
the Dreamland Burlesquers this week in 
St. Louis. Possibly expectations were too 
pent up by the circuslike heralding of the 
feature. Joe Pazen. 



Winthrop, Mass., Feb. 27. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir — My attention has been called to 
"Kink's" criticism of our act at Keith's, 
Philadelphia, in your issue of February 24. 
The reason that we"lasted but one perform- 
ance" was on account of the Children's 
Society refusing to allow Buster to play. 
Buster is but five years old. We played 
a very successful engagement the week be- 
fore at Keith's Boston house, and the act 
has always gone well wherever we are al- 
lowed to play Buster." In justice to the 
"child phenom" kindly state these facts 
in your next issue. We also had to cancel 
Tony Pastor's this week on account of 
Children's Society. Boyd Coleman. 



1/ 



Devlin and Ellwood. 
Singing Sketch. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 

The male portion of this team is good, 
but is seriously handicapped by a stick for 
a partner whose rightful position on the 
stage should be in a chorus where she 
could pose to better effect. The man sings 
a radically new kind of a drinking song 
which goes very well. He will never be 
able to draw the salary with such a part- 
ner that he could were he alone. 

Mil ford Mowers. 

Edith Fassette. 
Comedienne. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 

Edith Fassette, comedienne, opened at 
the Family this week in a series of new 
songs. This, however, is only a part of her 
act. She is also a very graceful dancer, but 
in order to put on her dance she require*, 
full stage. This would have inconvenienced 
the management to the extent of having to 
set the stage for two acts in "four" in suc- 
cession. Miss Fassette is therefore coin- 
polled to cut her dance to get the act in 
"one." She has a sweet voice of small 
volume which is not heard to good advan- 
tage in her selections. Mil ford Mowers. 



New York, Feb. 27, 1900. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir — I ran over to Hyde & Behman's the 
other day to have a chat with my old 
friend Nick Norton. Seated in the office, 
while Nick and Will Burgess were "count- 
ing up," I picked up a copy of Variety (the 
first I had seen) and was at once inter- 
ested, so much so that I read it through. 
I have been a reader of another dramatic 
publication for just thirty-six years, and 
hereafter shall buy Variety every week. 
Although practically out of the show busi- 
ness now, I was, some sixteen years ago, 
fairly well known as "the man ahead" of 
Lester and Allen's Picked Vaudeville Stars 
of America, with genial Dick Brock as 
manager. How widely scattered are the 
people now living who were with that com- 
bination. Billy Lester and Paul Allen. 
Daly and Devere, Annie Hart, Frank H. 
White, the Flighleys, Katie Rooney, Adolph 
Seaman, the great Hilton, Al Lubin, 
"Ajax" Whitman and others. 

1 Fred D. Ellis. 




"BEDFORD'S HOPE" FOR LONDON. 

Lincoln J. Carter's sensational Western 
melodrama, "Bedford's Hope," which has 
scored a big hit at the Fourteenth Street 
Theatre here, is going to London very 
shortly through the engineering of M. B. 
Loavitt. Final arrangements were made 
last Monday, ex-Judge Dittenhoefer at- 
tending to the legal preliminaries. It will 
open in the English metropolis at the 
Scala Theatre in the East End, which has 
been thoroughly overhauled, and the 
American piece will mark the reopening. 



New York, Feb. 26, 1906. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir — The article in your issue of the 
24th inst., headed "Hurtig and Seamon 
Waking Up" certainly was the best thing 
that I read in many a day. You struck 
the nail on the head when you said "that 
the guardian angel of the outer oflice" kept 
everybody away whose looks she did not 
like. By the "angel" I know that you 
mean "the stout lady." You overlooked the 
principal part of the story why artists can- 
not get engagements. You were also right 
when you said about II. and S. not having 
to put out the "S. R. O." sign. If an act 
has any kind of a "pull" with the junior 
member of the firm then they get not only 
one week but five during the season. I 
know whereof I speak, as the "angel" 
would always say "Mr. Seamon is out." 
Kindly publish thi3 so that the other 
members of the firm know how they stand. 

A Perform er. 



Terre Haute, Ind., Feb. 26. 190fi. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir — Wish you would make a mention In 
your paper of acts throwing managers down 
the last minute for no reason at all. Net- 
tie Fields had been boasted strong and 



featured and canceled last minute. We 
did not know she was not coming until 
Monday. This leaves managers in bad 
shape. Trust you will help stop any im- 
positions of this kind. Jack llocfflcr. 



Chicago, 111., Feb. 22, 1906. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — When 1 left New York the first of 
the year I promised to give you my im- 
pressions of the circuit known as the In- 
terstate and accordingly will do so. 

We opened in Hot Springs for a tour of 
seven weeks. While personally we re- 
ceived the best of treatment we did not 
receive the full time. The correspondent 
who sent you the special from St. Louis 
published in your issue of February 17 
said, "there is no truth in the report that 
we have closed our theatres in Birming- 
ham and one other place." This is a de- 
liberate falsehood and whoever wrote it 
knew it. The Waco house, for which we 
held contracts for week of February 6, 
was run for three nights a week for two 
weeks and the day before we were to open 
there we were informed that the house 
was closed and our week changed to Fort 
Worth, thereby losing the week. We were 
led to expect that our contract at Little 
Rock would be fulfilled up to a few days 
before we were to open when we were in- 
formed that the house could not be^made 
ready in time. We went through Little 
Rock on our way to Memphis three days 
after and found that the roof was not on 
the theatre yet and people in town said 
that it would be impossible for the house 
to open within thirty days at the least. 
All of which the managers must have 
known. I wrote to one of the numerous 
managers, as instructed to do by the 
travelling representative of the circuit, 
asking if they could not fill one of the 
weeks for which I held a contract (which 
had no cancellation clause) in a return 
engagement. After a few days I received 
a very curt note to the effect "that it was 
against orders and that I was receiving 
the best treatment possible." However, 
laying aside all personalities, I think that 
when the circuit gets whipped into shape 
and in running order it will be a 
good engagement and if the managers are 
only compelled to live up to their con- 
tracts after once signing them no fault, 
will be found with the Interstate Circuit. 
Two of the acts who were on trie bill with 
us held contracts for nine weeks and re- 
ceived only five. You can see where the 
injustice of that lies without further com- 
ment. Nrircll and Xihlo. 



Will the anonymous writer of the dis- 
sertation on agents kindly write again, 
using only those adjectives used in polite 
society and the home circle? We should 
be glad to print his effusion, but wish to 
retain our second class mailing privilege* 
Will he al°o bear In mind the fad thai 
letters arc rmt printed Unless the name 
of the writer accompanies the same, the 
latter being held in strict confidence? 



THE AGENTS' MEETING. 

The theatrical agents of the city were 
in conclave on Thursday evening listening 
to Miss France* Kellor discourse on the 
iniquities of the employment agency laws 
as now recorded upon the statutes of this 
State. An effort is to be made to elimi- 
nate the agents from the State and local 
jurisdiction, Frederick L. Keating, the ex- 
Commissioner of Licenses, having been re- 
tained, and a new bill has been drafted 
which it is hoped will pass the present 
Legislature. 



RIGO WILL TOUR. 

Kigo, his table d'hote band and some real 
actors will take to the road at the com- 
pletion of the Williams time, playing ly- 
eeum dates and regular theatres. Rigo 
will discard his dress suit and take up his 
gypsy uniform. 



LIONEL LAWRENCE'S IDEA. 

Lionel Lawrence will shortly introduce a 
bare stage act in which he will show a 
glimpse of the real "behind the scenes." 
He has been a stage manager for years and 
he will show the audiences how a show is 
rehearsed, starting with the entrance of 
the girls for a rehearsal and concluding 
with a dress performance. The stage will 
be set in view of the audience and no de- 
tail making for realism will be omitted. 



KIDDING RIGHT THIS TIME. 

Shean and Warren have been working 
over their new version of "Kidding the 
Captain" at Atlantic City this week, and 
the result will probably be seen in New 
York in a few weeks. The sketch was 
put on a few years ago for a single week 
at Proctor's Twenty -third Street. Since 
then it has been in cold storage, but there 
appears to be no trace of frost about it. 



"PORTERS ON THE BANNER BLUE." 

After full preparations had been almost 
completed by Tim McMahon for his new 
production, he found that the name se- 
lected, "The Robinson Crusoe Girls" was 
not appropriate, and will call it "Porters 
on the Banner Blue" instead. 



MORE TRICKS FOR COPYISTS. 

The Stein-Eretto Family, originators of 
the human arch, will close their European 
tour June 1 and will come directly to 
America, playing here four months before 
returning to London to open at the Hip- 
podrome in October. They are bringing 
over two new and sensational tricks. 



SPADONI IN JUNE. 
Spadoni will arrive in this country in 
June, playing time on the Orpheum and 
middle west circuits. He is announced in 
current report as coming every few weeks 
but he will not get here before the time 
mentioned. 



POLI IS HOME. 

S. Z. Poli returned from Florida by 
steamer Thursday and immediately went 
into executive session with William Mor- 
ris. Tie returned to New Haven without 
savins that he had a Florida circuit. 



Mabel John son, once of the Weber- 
Kields chorus, and more lately in the 
Broadway Trio, has joined the Washington 
Society Girls for the remainder of the 
season. 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Si me 



IMPERIAL. 

Ash Wednesday had its effect upon the 
attendance, but Arthur Dunn managed to 
fill the house with merriment. Dunn 
s^ems to have dropped the elevation of 
the piano stool, and with Marie G lazier 
as the foil secures legitimate laughs. 

Pierce and Roslyn replaced (J race 
Cameron on the -bill, and were li^ed by 
the audience, particularly Miss Rosy In in 
her first solo, but the other two popular 
numbers she sings with Mr. Pierce are 
entirely unsuited to her voice. Coakley 
and MeBride sang, talked and danced. 
The makeup of the wench is noticeable 
for fidelity, but no great change has been 
made in the actual workings. 

Smirl and Ressner in "The Bellboy 
and the Waiting Maid" made a hit 
through Smirl's acrobatic work, he being 
both an able acrobat and a contortionist. 
The young woman does not seem to be the 
same formerly seen in the act. Leona 
Thurber and the Four Blackbirds are 
giving a lively turn. Miss Thurber has 
about the likeliest lot of "picks" now in 
use, the smaller end boy being a good 
dancer and the whole act winning out 
easily. 

Ferroros and his dog musician opened 
the show and was fairly received, the au- 
dience seeming to believe that, trickery of 
some kind was attempted. Cathrine 
Countiss in "Wedded by Wire" was a near 
approach to a headliner, on the program, 
and will be found under New Acts. 

The three Sisters Macarte in an as- 
sorted act work both on the tight wire and 
the trapeze, and have so much of all with 
so little of the real meritorious part, which 
is the wire walking, that the value is af- 
fected through the bungling manner in 
which the act has been put together. The 
aerial end of it is all that should be given, 
the opening musical number on guitars and 
a mandolin being a silly adjunct to an of- 
fering of this character. The women 
should do single work on the wire to fill 
in the time if necessary. 

Although the audience kept away from 
James J. Morton for a few minutes after 
he first appeared, they were wjpn over with 
his exposure of the unreality Iff the Coun- 
tiss sketch, and after that Morton con- 
vinced those present that even if his talk 
appeared foolish it was funny. His pres- 
ent final encore is about the best thing 
that he has offered. 



KEENEY'S. 

The usual allotment of four new acts 
are at Keeney's Thentre in Brooklyn. They 
will be found under that department. 

Of the "regulars" Jewell's Mannikins are 
the more prominent and easily the hit of 
the bill. No matter how many times this 
act plays a house, it never "falls down," 
for the wonderment caused by the expert 
manipulation of the wooden figures creates 
an interest ending in applause, which is 
accentuated by the bewildering, sparkling 
electrical display at the finale. No better 
drawing card for the young can be offered. 

Louise Gunning intentionally mislaid 
the kilts, or perhaps Miss Gunning desired 
to display a gown, for she appeared in 
skirts, but is more becoming in her Scotch 
costume. The opening numl»er was "La 
Traviata," which is also new for this 
singer in vaudeville. The Scotch songs 
, 'followed, and her reception was cordial. 



but not quite so enthusiastic as when in 
t he abbreviated garments, for those add a 
charm, enhancing the appreciation of the 
tinging. Miss Gunning should hark back 
to the multi-colored dress with the be- 
witching stockings (or tights). The men 
will like her so much better then. 

Fields and Ward made a change in their 
act, too. The special drop was not in use, 
and the opening of the old turn was given 
with the new "business man" ending. It 
is riot as well liked as the more recent set- 
ting, but Fiejds manages to carry his audi- 
ence regardless of what he says or does. 
Ward as a "feeder" needs no assistance, 
but somehow or other he will not part 
with that to him humorous knack of slap- 
ping his partner in the face with a glove. 
In the old days when gloves were expen- 
sive or salaries lower a newspaper played 
the part. With the change to genteel kid 
gloves the team probably thought suffi- 
cient concession had been allowed. This 
sort of slapstick in polite vaudeville is 
rough and not comical, even though a 
laugh is gained now and then. Other cou- 
ples have invented something more en- 
gaging, why not Fields and Ward? 

Green Brothers opened the show with 
"comedy juggling." This juggling is club 
swinging, and even if the comedian were 
actually such he would be unnecessary for 
comedy in the turn if a good club swinger. 
The work the.y offer at present is not ex- 
tended enough, nor have they a sufficient 
number of the clubs. The "straight" man 
dresses in a baseball suit, very neat and 
away from the tennis court stvle. There 
may be a financial reason here why a more 
elaborate display is not made, but club 
swinging offers a wide range of possibili- 
ties in tricks, and that part of the per- 
formance onlv should be looked after, as 
good work in this line is always assured of 
appreciation. 



FAMILY. 

Although not the headliner at the Fam- 
ily Theatre on East 125th street this 
week, Leslie's Porcine Circus is the nov- 
elty at least. It is a common impression 
that the pig is the most difficult to 
train of all animals, yet Leslie has suc- 
ceeded, although it is a most disagreeable 
act in every way imaginable. One dog is 
carried and Mr. Leslie will do much bet- 
ter to allow his swill devouring pets 
to regain their normal size and devote his 
attention to other animals who will prove 
more profitable in vaudeville. 

Rhoda Bernard is the feature. This 
young woman is a female Hebrew imper- 
sonator, singing one song straight to great 
applause, with the assistance of a man 
planted in a box. Miss Bernard ha* 
helped herself to any Hebrew story she 
thought likely and has a couple of paro- 
dies in the same dialect. She could im- 
prove her opening by telling a story or 
two before her first song. The Matzumota 
Troupe of Japanese acrobats have some 
pedal and contortion work which is not 
sensational, although a couple of new 
tricks are shown, and the perch finish is 
supplied by a woman balancing the pole. 

Louise Arnot and Thomas Gurm (or 
Gunn) have the only sketch on the bill, 
called "Regan's Luck." Miss Arnot is a 
very good Irishwoman with a deep voice 
which suggests at first that it is an im- 
personation by a man. The sketch draws 



laughs, although somewhat draggy, and 
should be gone over to stimulate the ac- 
tion from the commencement. Thomas 
Ray in illustrated songs is evidently one 
of the singing acts which it is rumored 
play the cheaper houses at the expense 
of the publishers whose songs are plugged. 

Harry and Mae Howard, German sing- 
ers, as the program has it, utterly belie 
the billing by singing very poorly, but 
dance extraordinarily well in wooden 
shoes. The man especially is first rate 
on his feet, introducing several steps not 
heretofore noticed, and- doing it all with 
a nimbleness that should bring ample en- 
gagements were he to develop the dances 
to the utmost. The talk is inane and the 
dialect poor. The dancing only is com- 
mendable. 

Marshall Montgomery, "Improvisatore," 
must needs change his name and billing. 
His main dependence is trick piano play- 
ing and he goes to the extreme by stand- 
ing upon his head, resting his feet against 
the upper case of the piano, playing with 
his hands. It is not showy or difficult, 
pleasing only in that it is new and does 
not take as well as when playing behind 
his back. Two of his stories are told in 
such a rambling, haphazard manner that 
they cannot be heard or the points caught. 
Mr. Montgomery besides a new name 
needs more schooling. 



CIRCLE. 

Weber and Rush's Parisian Widows 
are at the Circle this week with "Ben 
Welch" stamped on everything excepting 
the scenery. 

The opening piece in written by him, he 
is accountable for the closing burlesque, 
and Mr. Welch does his Hebrew impersona- 
tion in the olio, using some of his brother 
Joe's latest "stuff" and singing some 
parodies, only one written on a modern 
success. The parodies, however, bring him 
recall after recall. He has a couple of new 
stories of his own (as far as known) that 
nre good. He is the hit of the show, sur- 
passing the others in the olio easily, and 
standing out brightly in the pieces. 

Honan and Kearney, in a sidewalk con- 
versation with more pa rod ies, also invade 
the olio. They have the appearance for a 
first class turn in "one," but their present 
material will never assist them. One of the 
parodies has the line "The night they got 
married" repeated three times in one verse, 
and it is the old "artificial wife" joke set 
to music. 

The Sisters Valmore would do better to 
appear in blackface. Mildred is a fair 
dancer, but Lulu does not earn that dis- 
tinction. The acrobatic work draws some 
applause. There is a field for feminine 
blackface acts, and this couple could fit in 
it with strict attention paid to dialect, that 
being excellent as evidenced in their open- 
ing song as a "sister act." 

Owley and Randall, in a juggling turn, 
will do better when Mr. Randall finds how 
to juggle and keep quiet at the same time. 
His talk has no point and his voice is 
against him. The juggling might also be 
vastly improved upon. The three Keltons 
were billed to appear in a musical act, but 
only two did so and they were unable to 
give it in full. 

The opening piece is called "The Car- 
nival at Monte Carlo." The chorus is the 
regulation size but not imposing, and badly 



trained. There is a stout little brunette 
on the end that throws the marches on; 
of alignment by her indifference and failure 
to keep step, while the costumes worn in 
the "Dutch" song, led by Mildred Valmore, 
have a seedy look, and were never built 
from material costing enough to cause a 
Woolworth store to decline the business. 
Ben Welch as an Italian pleases the 
audience some, although mixing dialects 
badly at times, and Ned Kelton does a 
short "bit" as a Chinaman which stands 
out. Pat Kearney as a "con" man looks 
the part perfectly, but speaks in a fearful 
monotone. Flossie La Van and Katherino 
Randall wander on and off the stage, and 
it was the fear of seeing them in tights that 
prevented the closing burlesque, "'A Day in 
Camp." from being looked over. 



THE OFFICE BOY ON VAUDEVILLE. 

"Here's a funny one," remarked the 
office boy as I was leaving the agent's 
office. "The boss to-day told a relative 
of his that 'vaudeville was just like any 
other show' and I had to fake up a pipe 
in a hurry to explain why 1 laughed. 

"I guess he was stuck for an answer, 
all right, and after thinking about it all 
day, I'm stuck, too. Of course, anybody 
can get sarcastic and tell what they think 
it is, and then wait for the laugh, but I 
wouldn't mind hearing a good definition. 
I know what the dictionary tells about it, 
but there's a whole lot of things in that 
book that I don't carry in my mind. 
— "Wh a n I was a little kid evervbodv said 



'variety show' and we knew that meant 
just what it said, but this vaudeville isn't 
so easy. You get too much in vaudeville 
to call it by any one name. 

"Most of the shows are a combination 
of a circus, dime museum, farce comedy 
and the drama, while generally the variety 
end is sandwiched in somewheres, and 
there's so much that they call it vaude- 
ville, but it isn't the real article. 

"There's one good point about the pres 
ent day shows, though. You don't have to 
pay a whole lot to see them, and it must 
be a person brooding over the chances he 
would have in the East River who 
wouldn't find something in the bill he 
liked. But if he doesn't find a whole lot. 
he thinks he's been cheated, and yet he 
will sit through a long dreary, weary 
show on Broadway for which $2 has been 
given up, and after leaving the only kick- 
registered is 'that it wasn't so bad, for 
that chorus in the second act was the 
goods.' 

"'That ehoriiV may have lasted "ii tie- 
stage about four minutes, yet he sat 
through a shine show to see it. Was it 
because he paid $2 or because he didn't 
expect any more? In vaudeville, where 
maybe he only paid fifty or seventy -five 
cents, if he only saw one thing in the 
bill he liked, that same man would go 
out and rave over the incompetency of 
the people running the theatre in putting 
up a bill like that. 

"You know many a farce comedy which 
was in reality only a vaudeville show ha-< 
made good in the legitimate, but split that 
same show up for a bill in vaudeville and 
it wouldn't stand by itself. Vaudeville 
has got me going. I'm going to give it 
to Sam Lloyd for his puzzle column in 
the Sunday papers." 8(me. 



VARIETY 



* ^ 



Shows of the Week 



By Chicot 



COLONIAL. 

Vesta Victoria in her second week haa 
partly lid herself of the cold which 
marred her earlier work, and she had the 
additional advantage of having made 
friends with the smart section of the au- 
dience. But one song was changed from 
the opening repertoire, this being the 
"(J race Darling," which was largely respon- 
sible for her London favor when she 
changed from straight to character work. 
It has a chorus that one cannot forget, and 
took place in favor with "Waiting at the 
Church." She also gave "The Country 
Uirl," which is hardly understood here, and 
the artist's model song. She might have 
sung more, but contented herself with 
bowing her thanks several times. Mine. 
Herrmann has put. in some more illusions. 
They are showy and save her a lot of trou- 
ble, but they are very old. She also con- 
ducts her gift enterprise, throwing candy 
to the audience, which this time is pro- 
duced from a screen instead of the old 
canisters — a change that is the only 
real novelty in the act. The act is eye 
pleasing, but that is all. The Glinseretti 
Troupe offer work alternately on the 
stage and the bounding mat. This last is 
particularly well done and deserves the 
applause it gets. They work with no 
parade, but go about their business with 
a quietness and a surety that arc equally 
pleasing. They should cut out lilac suits 
when working against the red of the mat 
drapery. There was much chromatic pro- 
fanity that might easily have been 
avoided. Cole and .lohnson had a new and 
good song" and went better than they did 
recently at Keith's. They are clever, but 
lliey must have material of value to 
make a real success. Mr. and Mrs. Gard- 
ner Crane show their playlet and score 
heavily. They have put in a mammy in- 
stead of the pickaninny, probably in defer- 
ence to the Gerry Society, and they have 
changed their climax to good effect, the 
first curtain now dropping on the Jovers 
alone on the stage, while the encore pro- 
longs the action. l)e Witt, Burns and 
Torrance did their full share of the work, 
and the Empire City Quartet had no 
Cause for complaint. Mr. and Mrs. Alli- 
son stick to "Minnie from Minnesota," 
I hough a new act is needed, and Hathaway 
and Walton do some dancing at the open- 
ing of the show. 



ORPHEUM. 

There are debuts and things happening 
at all of the Williams Big Three this 
week, the Orpheum's allotment being the 
first appearance here in a number of years 
of Harry Corson Clarke, who is a sort of 
Corse Pay ton of the Western slope. His 
offering is commented upon under New 
Acts. In addition, Henri de Vries holds 
for a second week with his protean sketch. 
The audiences at the Orpheum seem quick- 
er to catch the finer points of an offering 
than any other audience in the vaudeville 
class, and while the act is listened to in 
almost complete silence the applause at 
the conclusion of the act is convincing. 
Clarice Vance is going better than she 
did last week and this in spite of the fact 
that but one of her songs is really suited 
to her genre. She sings four and the 
singing of a fifth rests entirely with her. 
The Picchiani family offer their acrobatic 
work to the usual good effect. They 



could do very much better by discarding 
skirts. The spectacle of women working 
in long skirts is no longer a novelty and 
the use of the garments hampers their 
best tricks. Ed Latell still sticks to his 
imitation of Ching Ling Foo and does a 
parody on Dida that is remembered by 
some. He would do better to give us more 
banjo work, for there are few who can 
meet him on this ground. Taylor Holmes 
tells stories well. If Mr. Holmes would 
only make a more careful selection he 
would be in high favor. One of his poems 
is a discard of Gus Williams, and others 
date still further* back, while the Mans- 
field speech is inexcusable at this late day. 
Herbert Brooks does his trunk trick neat- 
ly and offers two card tricks that show up 
well on the stage. It is hard to find card 
work that appeals to the gallery as well 
as those who pick out the cards, but 
Brooks has two tricks that reach all the 
way and his trunk mystifies. Bellman 
and Moore make a hit on the early part 
of the bill with their vaudeville travesty. 
It is to be regretted that Miss Moore did 
not find out earlier what a success she 
could be as a child impersonator. The 
whole act pleases, but this stands out, 
calling loudly for an extension of time. 
Cabaret's dogs still do good tricks. Prob- 
ably if they were not better trained they, 
too, would laugh at their master's straw 
hat. 



PASTOR'S. 

Two new acts at Pastor's are to be 
found under their proper classification. Of 
the others Holcombe, Curtis and Webb 
take the top place on the bill. Holcombe 
had a cold and only Margaret Webb was 
in good voice. She offended with a child 
song, sung not because she is good at this 
work, but because her predecessor made a 
feature of that sort of thing. Miss Webb 
is better in more ambitious work, and this 
fact should be taken to heart by the di- 
recting head of the act. Charles F. Sea- 
mon did not do as well in the matter of 
applause, but he made a lasting impres- 
sion with his quiet methods. He is differ- 
ent from the others, and this fact is appre- 
ciated. O'Brien and Buckley were one of 
the real hits here, their work being suited 
to the tastes of the Pastor clientele. If 
Mr. O'Brien would alter his grammar and 
moderate his exuberant style he would 
find a wider range of employment. Tre- 
loar did a strong man act that was helped 
by the fact that he cut out his muscle 
parade and got right down to real work. 
One of his chief points is the fact that he 
uses Edna Tempest for most of his tricks. 
Miss Tempest's weight cannot be tampered 
with, while dumbbells are not always 
what they seem in the matter of avoirdu- 
pois. The finish in which a horse and rider 
are lifted with one arm is capital. Gracie 
Emmett has a good program place and did 
a lot of the laugh making. She is a really 
funny woman and her appearance is al- 
ways welcome. Her support is not par- 
ticularly good, but she is a company in her- 
self. James and Dolly Emerson had a 
poor act, poorly played, while Philbrooks 
and Reynolds might have been better with 
a good sketch. There is the skeleton of a 
good offering in their present act, but the 
skeleton is badly padded. The dialogue is 
not carefully considered. If instead of the 
loose lines they now employ new and 



crisper material were had they would fare 
very much better. Grace Guilders does 
some contortion dancing and winds up with 
a patient poodle, which camps on the base 
of her spine with a blase air. She does 
not make good use of the dog and could 
leave him in the basket with profit to her- 
self and the audience. Collis Le Page and 
Montague and O'llara are also listed, to 
say nothing of the "Hlustro-Electric," 
which is a stereopticon. 



FIFTY-EIGHTH STREET. 

in addition to Charles E. Evans and his 
company (mentioned under New Acts) 
there were many points on the Proctor 
bill to command the approval of the 
crowd. Also were there too many full 
stage acts on the first half of the bill and 
there were a couple of waits. Omar Singh 
showed his Human Butterlly, which is 
merely a new name for the old Astarte 
broom trick with the double belt. It is 
well worked, with the lights framed in 
pairs about in the eyes of serpents instead 
of on a straight batten. Johnson and 
Wells got through with their singing and 
dancing, though they are unimportant in 
either department, and the Elgona 
Brothers complicate some good acrobatic 
work with a very poor female impersona- 
tion. More acrobatics were had from 
Spissell Brothers and Mack, who scarcely 
need to copy Rice and Prevost. Some of 
their own work is plenty good enough if 
they would hold the act to that standard. 
Not one is a good pantomimist and this 
end might be more carefully looked after. 
Dan McAvoy did an act with Georgia 
Kelly on one end of the line and four 
women in white suits' on the other. He 
was the real hit of the bill and this in 
spite of the fact that he has not made a 
very great change in his work and uses too 
much of his imitation of James Russell. 
It is not so much material as method with 
McAvoy and when he comes out with a 
gun to choke off the applause as he did 
ten years ago they laugh at it just as 
heartily. More use might be made of the 
girls. They appear in the opening and in 
one song; the rest of the time they prob- 
ably spend in the wings wondering what 
they were hired for. To some four girls 
are more of an attraction that a somewhat 
similar McAvoy. The Three Dumonds 
did not score very strongly here. The 
balcony and gallery patrons do not go in 
for the high grade music and the act is 
not as good as once it was. Mr. Dumond 
should make a change in his selection if he 
expects to make a continued success. Bert 
Leslie and Robert Dai ley were very much 
more to the popular taste and Leslie'* glib 
slang was appreciated, while the Florenz 
troupe closed the show with a whoop and 
there were pictures afterward. 



LONDON. 

It is scarcely fair to blame upon Charles 
Ilorwitz the two burlettas used by the 
Tiger Lilies at the London this Week. 
They may have been good once, but sonc 
one cut out most of the comedy. The man- 
agement went further than that and cut 
out the chief comedian. On the road they 
had Alexander Carr, but through some pe- 
euliar line of reasoning he was eliminated 
from the company just before they came to 
town, and the business suffers in conse- 



quence, the comedian not having been re- 
placed. There was another act out of the 
olio that has been with the show on the 
road. The Campbell-Drew Company should 
realise that New York is scarcely the town 
in which to cut down expenses. They have 
cut more out of the receipts than out of 
the expense account, ltichy W. Craig does 
what he can to hold the show up alone, but 
cannot overcome the general dreariness. 
He shows to better advantage in the olio 
where he has his musical work and his 
phonograph partner, which gave an idea 
to Lew Doekstader. The timing is accu- 
rately done and the speeches are taken up 
with celerity. The idea redeems some very 
old jokes. Carrie Ester and Josette Webb 
have discarded their old act and make the 
alleged sketch over into a singing turn in 
which Miss Ezier grows most tiresome in 
the Ixlief that she is a comedienne. They 
make most of their hit in the burlesques. 
Miss Webb ! tights no longer shapes up 
on the old piano ..ties, and Miss Ezier does 
a song in which she successively uses each 
chorus girl as a partner. As there are nine 
girls she receives nine encores. William 
Allen starts the olio with what he considers 
a humorous Irish monologue. If he could 
ever >ce himself from the front of the 
house he would not do it again. His stories 
even when they are tnlcen, . from other 
sources lack point, and his songs are be- 
whiskered. Cunningham and Lord hav* 
a dancing act, and Charles Semon's Na- 
poleon imitation. The latter loses effect 
but the dancing is better. There are some 
motion pictures that are good. The show 
as a whole is poor because it lacks brisk- 
ness. 



TROUBLE ON ITS WAY. 

Everybody within hearing distance give 
ear to a tale of piracy on the high seas. 
The black (lag has been nailed to the mast- 
head And the chief of the pirate crew has 
set sail with a fair wind for these shores. 

Price and Revost — mark the name — with 
a new ami original novelty, to wit, "Hump- 
ety Bumps," which they have been present- 
ing with some success on the other side, 
have announced that they will presently 
sail for America ami present "their laugh- 
ing success" on this side of the water. 

Such was the word that reached the 
vaudeville agents' offices yesterday. Price 
and Revest are the same that some weeks 
since wrote to Rice and Prevost — mark the 
name observing with charming naivete 
that -hey had taken as much of the Rice 
and Prevost name as their sense of decency 
permitted, having grabbed off the "Rumpety 
Bumps" en masse, and hoped that there 
would be no objection, etc. 

'"Larceny, piracy and stop thief!" ejacu- 
lated an agent yesterday when he heard of 
the coming invasion. "The Washington 
monument is something like f>(H) feet tall, 
they s:\v, but for monumental nerve this 
pair look down on that from the same rela- 
tive height that De Wolf Hopper regards 
the crown of Major Doyle's head." 



THE SUNDAY AGITATION. 
Although repotted throughout the week 
that drastic measures would he taken this 
Sunday by th" police department against 
the Sunday eorwM*rt*, the various managers 
interested do not auti< ipate any undue ac* 
tion. no marked changes ir. the makeup of 
the bills having been attempted. 



10 



VARIETY 



The Beach Amusement Company in Chi- 
cago had finally determined through lack 
vi financial support not to open ita park 
at the Lakeside there this summer. 



Eph Thompson's elephants have heen 
booked for the lngeraoll circuit for ten 
weeks, opening at Pittsbqrg on May 7. 



The interview of Frank Melville, the 
summer park manager and promoter (of 
the firm of Melville & Shultheiaer), which 
appeared in the last issue of Variety, 
called forth much comment during the 
week in park circles. One well informed 
park man said, in speaking to a repre- 
sentative of Variety, "Mr. Melville's in- 
terview was right and straight from the 
shoulder. He struck the nail precisely 
oq the head in speaking about bands and 
the attraction they have proven. Bands 
are a dead issue to summer amusement 
n sorts, other than as an incidental diver- 
sion. Patrons do not care to be held in 
one spot for the length of time necessary 
to hear a program. Vaudeville bills and 
other changeable forms of amusement are 
more attractive." 



To further illustrate his argument the 
park man cited the case of Sousa's Band 
when it played for George C. Tilyou at 
Atlantic City some four years ago. At 
that time George Young, who is the boss 
of the seaside resort, had determined that 
Tilyou should not have a footing there at 
any cost. Tilyou was at his wits' end 
and called upon Sousa for a price to play 
sixty-six days for him at his opposition 
place to Young's Pier. Sousa said $1,000 
a day. Tilyou, not to l>e daunted at any 
figure, acceded and Sousa accepted the en- 
gagement, although knowing he had over- 
charged $150 a day, the bandmaster's cus- 
tomary price being $850 daily. The first 
day's taking of the engagement was $400. 
At the end of ten days Sousa offered to 
release Tilyou from the contract, but the 
latter indignantly spurned the offer, re- 
marking that he always lived up to his 
contracts. At the expiration of the en- 
gagement Sousa received $60,000 from 
Tilyou, who had lost $40,000 on the ven- 
ture, but was reimbursed to the extent 
of $10,000 by the bandmaster, who re- 
funded that amount, declining to accept 
in payment for the band's services more 
than the customary stipulated price. Til- 
you accepted the money only after Sousa 
had explained that the original price was 
set more in a spirit of banter than in the 
expectation that it would be accepted. 



The Starland Company, which has had 
a varied experience lately, will not enter 
New Bedford, Mass., as it hoped to do, 
not finding a suitable location there, and 
has about decided to go back to the scene 
of its first enterprise, Montreal. The 
company holds a leasehold in the Canadian 
city and will work night and day to open 
in due season to compete with Edward 
Dorsey's Dominion Park, now nearing 
completion in the same town, and which 
has the backing of the railroad compa- 
nies to further its chances of success. 



Toronto and Hamilton, Canada, are two 
likely cities which will probably receive 
attention from the park people before 
long. 



SUMMER PARKS 



sever*] years back. Kash promise* im- 
poitiblf of fulfillment and meagre secur- 
ity, together with the explosion of so 
many financial schemes including the sen- 
*,itional insurance disclosures have tended 
to keep capital from investing. Street 
railway companies, however, still view park 
projects with favor, although the usual 
limit placed by the transportation people 
varies, running from $50,000 to $100,000 
I »r each resort. This is a limitation that 
the larger parks cannot entertain. 



•'Fire and Flames," which Manning & 
Armstrong are trying to promote, may be 
placed in Wonderland at Revere Beach. 
The final closing of negotiations has not 
vet reached a crisis. The appeal for sub- 
scriptions for this enterprise seemingly 
never reached further than Mr. Higgins, 
the treasurer of the Wonderland Company, 
whose name has a very lonesome resting 
place on the subscription book. 



Paragon Park at Nantasket Beach, near 
Boston, will add largely to its attractions, 
having had a very successful summer last 
vear. E. Meverhof at Eleventh street 
and Third avenue is the booking agent, 
while a Mr. Dodge is the manager. It is 
the intention to put up a stiff fight against 
the opposition at Revere Beach. 



A scenic production of "The Train 
Wieckers" will be shown this coming sum- 
mer at Dreamland, Coney Island; also at 
Luna Park in the same place. Both are 
claiming the credit for the scheme, while 
a young man from the South says it has 
been stolen from a published account of 
his own notion. It's all rather humorous 
when the truth of the matter is a similar 
attraction was offered as an open air show 
at Joliet, 111., some twenty years ago. 
Joliet was selected at that time to recall 
pleasant recollections to a few of the 
"Pen's*' inmates. 



Morris A. Tobin will invade Dreamland 
at the Island this summer with a new 
idea in the form of Moqui Indians exhibit- 
ing the tribe's dances and tricks, which 
may amuse. A part of the Midget City 
site will be turned over for this purpose, 
hut the midgets will remain a feature, 
although it is not known where the dwarfs 
are coming from. 



There is very little definite information 
leaking out regarding Dreamland, prin- 
cipally for the reason that there is noth- 
ing to tell. No one connected with the 
management seems to be aware that he 
is alive, and the nominal manager, ex- 
Sheriff William J. Buttling, displays 
more energy in kidding proposed enter- 
prises than business acumen in investigat- 
ing. Everything goes to William II. Rey- 
nolds, who is the head still. 



L. A. Thompson and George C. Tilyou 
have completed their partnership agree- 
ment for Rockaway. 



The Ingersoll people consider their 

Winnipeg proposition so favorably that 

not one dollar of s^tock in it has been 
t offered for sale. 



Mr. Rosen will rename it The Tri-City, 
it is understood, opening on Decoration 
Day. 



II. Roltaire has returned from Loudon, 
where he went some weeks ago to visit 
Imre Kiralfy at his new resort to be 
located at Sheppard's Bush. Mr. Rol- 
taire makes no announcement, and it is 
suspected that he wanted a sea ride. 



Charles A. Cummings, the Wild West 
man who can "land on his feet" more of- 
ten than any showman in the business, 
will put a new Indian Congress into Jungle 
Park at Chicago this summer. Sig. Saw 
telle and Walter L. Main are Mr. Cum- 
mings' latest financial backers. 



Joseph J. McCarthy of Dreamland, 
Coney Island, made a Hying trip to Bos- 
ton this week. Whenever Mr. McCarthy 
is seen arounuSsomething usually follows. 



"Darkness and Dawn" will be put on at 
Coney's Dreamland this summer instead 
of "Touring Europe." 



Arthur Voegtlin, the scenic artist, is ar- 
ranging for a large production at Luna 
Park. 



Luna Park may have a Wild West ex- 
hibition this season. 



George A. Dodge, manager of Paragon 
Park at Nantasket Beach, near Boston, is 
in town booking attractions. Will Hill, 
the high wire walker, has been engaged 
through Meyerhoff at 200 East Eleventh 
street, who is routing the time for a chain 
of parks. 



The Friede "Globe Tower," called "A 
Department Store of Amusement," has got- 
ten out a prospectus which is an attrac- 
tion in itself. The details are carefully 
given in the booklet, but it is the induce- 
ments offered to the intending investor 
through purchase of the stock of the enter- 
prise that causes the smiles to ripple over 
the countenances of those "in the know." 
The regular summer attendance at Coney 
Island is estimated at twenty-two mil- 
lions, which is probably fairly correct, but 
from then on the financial figures are jum- 
bled together until the net profit for the 



The Ghas. K. Harris Courier 

Devoted to the interest* of Song* and Singe i* 

Address all communications to 

(HAS. K. HARRIS. 81 W. Slst St., N. Y. 

(Meyer Cohen, Mgr.) 



Vol. 1. 



New York. March S, 1906. 



No. 8. 



Notwithstanding t n e 
heated controversy 
that has been going on 
in the dally papers be- 
tween Mr. Dave Lewis, 
who sang "Mother, 
Pin a Rose On Me." at 
Proctor'a 23d St. The- 
atre, and Mr. Dan 
McAvoy, who sang the 
same song at I'roctor'a 
58th street bouse, the 
fact remains that both 
these people are sing- 
ing the song and will 
continue to sing it, aa 
Is also "Single" Billy 
Clifford, who has been 
creating a positive 
sensation at Hurtlg ft 
Seamon's Music Hall 
the past week, and ao 
can any one who wish- 
es to sing thla song, 
as all restrictions have 
been positively re- 
moved and any one 
can sing it. As these 
gentlemen are contin- 
ually playing the dlf- 
f e r e n t vaudeville 
houses, there is no 
way whereby they can 
conflict with each 
other, and as there are 
over five hundred 
vaudeville houses, 
there are plenty thea- 
tres for any legitimate 
artist to uBe this enor- 
mous success. If you 
haven't got enough 
verses in the regular 
song, you can write 



your own. Profession- 
al coplea and orches- 
trations are now ready. 
As we predicted some 
time ago that HENRY 
ft OALLOTT'S going 
together again as part- 
ners would create a 
sensation in the illus- 
trating line haa come 
true, for they certain- 
ly did create the big- 
gest sensation ever 
created In a New York 
theatre last Sunday 
night at Ted Marks' 
Concert with the sing- 
ing of the phenomenal 
baritone, Harry 
Henry, and the mov- 
ing pictures and illus- 
trations thrown upon 
the canvas by George 
F. Gallott, with the 
new march song hit 
entitled "Sister." Mr. 
Henry, after repeated 
encores, was compelled 
to make a speech be- 
fore the show was al- 
lowed to proceed. They 
now have In prepara- 
tion Mr. Harris' new 
song, "The Belle of 
the Ball," with mov- 
ing pictures, beauti- 
fully colored, on which 
they have spent a 
great deal of time and 
money, and we predict 
for it the same enor- 
mous success as they 
had last Sunday night 
with "Sister." 



season for the "Globe" is given as $1,- 
122,250, with an investment of $973,500. 
The operating expenses are to be $230,750, 
and everything considered, it seems foolish 
to let the general public in on a good 
thing" like this. So few enterprises are 
able to pay one hundred and twenty-five 
per cent, in dividends. 



F. \V. Henninger, treasurer of the West 
View Park Company of Pittsburg, em- 
phatically denies the rumor in a recent 
number of Variety that work had been 
stopped on this park. He says bis com- 
pany is spending at least $1,000 a day get- 
ting ready for the opening, which takes 
place May 10, and that they have already 
booked seventy-five picnics for the coming 
season, which of itself is sufficient to in- 
sure the success of the enterprise. The 
Pittsburg traction companies also, it is 
stated, are investing at least $75,000 in a 
supply storage plant, switches, loading 
platforms, etc., to enable them to take care 
of the extra traffic they expect when the 
park is in operation. 



VARIETY THEATRES OF GREATER NEW YORK 

MANHATTAN. 

ATLANTIC GARDEN, Bowery Concert 8P.IL 

ALHAMBRA, 7th Ave. and 125th St Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

CI RCLE, Broadway and 60th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

COLONIAL, Broadway and 63d St Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

DEWEY, 14th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

FAMILY, East 125th St Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

GOTHAM, East 125th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

HUBTI0 & SEAMON'S, West 125th St Vaudeville 2:30 and 8:30 P. M. 

HAMMERSTEINS, Times Sq Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

HUBERS, 14th St Museum Continuous. 

HIPPODROME, 6th Ave. and 44th St Variety 2 and 8 P. M. 

KEITH'S, 14th St Vaudeville Continuous. 

LONDON. Bowery Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

MINER'S BOWERY, Bowery Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M*. 

MINER'S 8TH AVE., 8th Ave. and 27th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M*. 

PALACE, Amsterdam Ave Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

PASTOR'S, 14th St j,. . . Vaudeville Continuous. 

PROCTORS 58TH STREET, 3d Ave and 58th St. Vaudeville 2:15 and 8:16 P. M. 

PROCTOR'S 23D STREET, West 23d St Vaudeville 2:15 and 8:15 P. M. 



BROOKLYN. 

AMPHION, Bedford Ave Vaudeville 2:15 and 

ALCAZAR, Washington St Burlesque 2 and 8 



(JAIETY, Broadway Burlesque 

GOTHAM, East New York Vaudeville 



.2 
.2 



and 8 
and 8 



There will be a lesser number of new 
.parks in operation this summer than for 



Max Rosen has taken over the park at 
Albany, which has Ix'en on the market, af- 
ter passing into the hands of a receiver. 



HYDE & BEHMAN, Adams St Vaudeville 2 and 8 

IMPERIAL, Fulton St Vaudeville 2 and 8 

KKF.NEY'S. upper Fulton St ; Vaudeville 2:15 and 

NASSAU. Wlllotighby St Burlesque 2 and 8 

NOVELTY. Drlggs Ave Vaudeville 2 and 8 

ORPHEUM, Fulton St Vaudeville 2:15 and 

STAR. Jay St Burlesque 2 and 8 

UNIQUE, Grand St Burleaque 2 and 8 



8:15 P. M. 
P. M\ 
P. M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
8:15 P. M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 

8:15 P. If. 
P. M\ 
P. ML 



x 



VARIETY 



ii 






CORRESPONDENCE 

BURLESQUE MOTES. 

"WUlIuuis' Ideals," under the management of 
Sim Williams, now in jhelJL thirtieth week, have 
finished the Pacific coast towns and will shortly 
start for the West again, going as far as St. 
l'nul. We have had a splendid season and every- 
body enjoyed the trip immensely. Most of the 
people with us this season had never before l>ecu 
to the setting of the sun. 

Tliis show had a preliminary season of four 
weeks and will have an auxiliary season of two 
weeks, which will give us forty-four weeks. That 
is going some and says a lot for our manager. 
While at Bozeman, Mont., Mrs. Jack Gruett and 
Bessie Little imagined they were Wild West 
riders and had a pleasant afternoon In the saddle, 
lint the miserable "bronks,"' as usual, were only 
waiting for a chance, und when they started for 
the stable displayed their usual trickiness and 
ran away, both women getting bad falls. In fact. 
Miss Little was out of the show for quite a time 
and the ladies ride now only in autos. 

This show had the pleasure of opening the Bijou 
at Baltimore, a new venture for this season. 
<>IK?ned up big and show went splendid and looks 
as If with careful handling the house would do If 
they keep good, healthy, clean shows; but one 
had boy will do a lot of damage in that house, for 
If the present audience is once startled It will be 
gone forever. 

Had a record week at Paterson week of Febru- 
ary 12 and the show was a tremendous hit. Busi- 
ness is big here at the Bon Ton, Jersey City, this 
week. Manager Dinkins, by the way, deserves a 
word of thanks and some credit for the handsome 
new dressing rooms and everything appertaining 
to them. They are grand, nice, bright, new and 
clean, comfortable and warm, something that the 
previous dressing rooms were not. 

Mrs. Clayton Frye (Frye and Allen) haB enjoyed 
herself much the past two weeks, as she has her 
four-year-old boy with her after the long separa- 
tion necessitated by the California trip, and on 
February 14 Frye and Allen celebrated their silver 
wedding, twenty -five years married (It does not 
seem that long, either). Many handsome presents 
were received by the happy couple. The chorus 
gave them a handsome silver tea set and many 
other smaller but valuable gifts were made. 
Clayton Frye gave his wife a beautiful set of dia- 
mond earrings and a big kiss. "You can't beat 
that." LEWIS LIVINGSTON. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
COLUMBIA (M. C. Anderson, uigr. ) .— There is 
not a weak turn on the bill. The Original Wes- 
tons, Catherine, Florence and Juliette, open the 
performance in an act entitled "The Musical 
gueens." They made a great hit. The Sclplo- 
Argenanti-Famour trio, In operatic aelectious in 
Italian, were excellent; Foster and Foster in 
"The Volunteer Pianist," big hit. Tbe Avon 
Comedy Four In "The New Teacher," which was 
good iu spots. Gus Williams, German comedian, 
has some new gags and made a big bit. Eddie 
Girard and Jessie Gardde"fin "Dooley and tuu 
Diamond," hit. Charles Leonard Fletcher in "At 
the Telephone." big hit. Mile. Martha Florrlne 
and her troupe of performing lions, pumas, 
leopards and Jaguars, great animal act. Next 
week: The Agoust Family, Hallen and Fuller, The 
Piroscoffs. Deltnore Sisters, Bailey and Austin, 
Brown, Harris and Brown, Sydney Grant and 

Fredo and Dare. PEOPLE'S (James E. Fennes- 

sy, mgr.). — Broadway Gaiety Girls, James H. Cur- 
tin, proprietor. The burlesque "Glittering Syl- 
via" was lively. Except for the work of John 
Weber, German comedian, tbe show would have 
been a rank failure. The burlesque la too long 
and drags. In the olio were Marie and Frances 
Green, sister team, fair; Kenuey and Hollls, talk- 
ing comedians, poor; Pas-ma-La Trio, poor, the 
Cuban pickaninny alone saving tbe act; Jack Mar- 
shall, mimic, good; Famous Melrose Troupe, hit; 
John Weber, German comedian In "Tbe Lost 
Child," good. The chorus was elegantly costumed 
and the scenery new. Next week: The Jolly Girls 

Burlesquers. STANDARD (Charlea M. Arnold, 

mgr.). — Gay Masqueraders. Large company, excel- 
lent chorus. The pony ballet a clean cut hit, the 
vocal ability being far above the average. The 
opening burlesque "The Adviser," was fair. In 
the olio were Harrison Sisters in songs and dances, 
hit; Berry and Berry in a musical turn that is 
good; Gourley, Sully and Gourley, acrobats, great 
hit; James and Lucia Cooper, in sidewalk conver- 
sation, fair. The closing burlesque, "Way Down 
Yeast." was fair. Next week: Rice and Barton's 
Burlesquers. NOTE.— James S. Howell has re- 
signed as assistant treasurer of the Columbia The- 
atre. George Schoettle remains as treasurer, while 
Charles Schweitzer succeeds Mr. Howell. 

H. HESS. 



PHILADELPHIA. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.). — No less than 
seven acts on this week's bill were given their 
llrst presentation iu this house and made up a 
program which was better than the usual in its 
entertainment quality. The real hit of the bill 
was scored by Clifton Crawford, who was last 
seen here in "Mother Goose." He offered a mono- 
logue, both refined and amusing, and sang in 
good voice. Mr. and Mrs. Mark Murphy gave 
their familiar sketch "The Coal Strike," and it 
was as pleasing as ever, winning well deserved 
laughter. W. II. Murphy and Blanche Nichols 
were back again with their "From Zaza to 
Uncle Tom." which hits proved a screaming suc- 
cess each time it has been given here. Emma 
Francis was another favorite to repeat a former 
triumph. She has worked Into her specialty with 
the two Arabs and her act is better than when 
previously seen here. Miss Francis is a hard 
worker and is reaping the rewards. Leon Morris 
and his pony circus was a pleasure for the chil- 
dren and interested the older ones. Morris en- 
countered all kinds of bard luck. He has Added 
a revolving table — the same as is used by Ber- 
zae — and It worked badly on Monday. On Wed- 
nesday an ambitious youth, anxious to earn the 
reward offered to any one who could stand on 
the table for a minute, tried It and was thrown 
off, breaking bla arm in two places. Tbe table 
was left out of the act for tbe remainder of tbe 



week. Balancing Stevens did a clown act which 
was hardly fair. Beruard Williams was another 
new one, calling himself a "talkative trickster," 
and was a second to Stevens. Texarkana and 
Walby essayed to please with a singing and 
dancing turn, with slight success. Griff Brothers 
in acrobatic feats claimed originality which was 
not shown. The McGrath Brothers were not up 
to the usual standard of banjolsts and their 
selections were poor. Heury Leoua — it used to be 
I.eoni when he was with the "Royal Chef" and 
other musical comedies — and Annie Dale presented 
for the first time here "A Lesson In Opera." 
Leona's voice showed its long usage, but be saved 
himself with a fair rendition of the Carmen 
"Toreador." Miss Dale has a passable voice 
when she remains in the middle register. Her 
high notes were screechy. Barry Thompson ap- 
peared as a team mate with Will Vidocq. They 
use a lot of Nat Haines' contributions to the old 
team of Haines and Vidocq, but did not do nearly 
so well with it. Wilton Brothers pleased with 
their comedy bar act and Celina Bobe played with 
skill on the xylophone and violin. She, like the 
McGrath Brothers, belongs in the list who persist 
In using "Miserere," "William Tell" and "Poet 
and Peasant." The first issue of the new house 
program met with deserved enthusiasm. It is a 
gem of the printer's art and a treasure for the 
souvenir collector. 

CASINO (Elias, Koenlg and Lcderer, mgre.) — 
The New York Stars furnished this week's bill. 
The company is large and capable enough with a 
better vehicle. There seems to be no excuse for 
giving "Papa's Coachman" as tbe title for the 
first part, which is simply a conglomeration of 
old time minstrel afterpieces. "Easy Doeslt," 
the burlesque, is not any better. Campbell and 
Caulfleld open the olio. Catherine Taylor sang 
acceptably. Lottie Fremont's doll work and some 
old style contortion tricks by Vic Jerome pulled 
the Faust Trio through. Raymond and Clark 
scored heavily with their rapid-fire talk and the 
Majestic Four had a musical act above the ordi- 
nary. Will Rogers, the lasso king, was featured 
as a special attraction and was a pronounced bit. 
Business big. 

TROCADERO (Fred Willson, mgr.).— The Uto- 
pians made their first appearance after a trip 
through the high brush and did the usual capacity 
business at this house. "Mixed, Muddled and 
Fixed" and "The School of Love" were the bur- 
lesque numbers, which were only ordinary. 

BIJOU (Geo. W. Rife, mgr.).— Business has 
been fair all week with Williams' Ideals as the 
attraction. There has been no change in the bill 
since given here earlier In the season at the 
Trocadero. and It repeated the former success. 

LYCEUM (J. O. Jermon, mgr.).— W. S. Clark's 
Jersey Lilies' Company appeared as the week's 
attraction with the same show as was seen at the 
Casino earlier in the season. Business remains 
al»out on the average. 

BON TON (Lily Tyson, mgr.).— With "Oliver 
Twist" as the dramatic offering by the stock 
company, Ray Erwln, Florence Simons, Ferguson 
and Farrell and the Acme Trio appeared In the 
vaudeville bill this week. 

NOTES.— Will Rogers, the lasso king, who has 
been used as a "special feature" to strengthen 
several of the Eastern Wheel shows, is booked to 
go abroad In two weeks. Resident Manager Daw- 
son has inaugurated a new plan to attract women 
to the Bijou. Women patrons are requested to 
guess at the nuinlier of persons In the house and 
the nearest to the official figures Is given an 
order for a spring bonnet. The gift occurs at 
each performance and has brought many women 
to the theatre. Fuller, of Sherman and Fuller, 
who have been doing an acrobatic turn with the 
Merrymakers, is laid up in the hospital here 
with an Injured leg. May Irish, a member of 
the Jolly Girls company, who is given credit for 
being aide to do some clever work, has signed 
with Tom McCready for next season. 

KINKS. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

ORPIIKUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Week 26 
saw fair business and fair bill with Watson, 
Hutchings and Edwards in "A Vaudeville Ex- 
change" as headllners. LeBrun Trio furnish a bit 
of grand opera In good voice and seemed to please. 
Ferry Convey plays on various musical Instru- 
ments In an acceptable manner. Harry LeClalr Is 
a particularly good female Impersonator. Bruno 
and Russell sing and dance and Happy Jack Gard- 
ner sings parodies written by himself. The Brun- 
ins do stunts with a billiard table and conclude 

with the man juggling the table on his chin. 

CENTURY (Joseph Barrett, mgr.).— The Alcazar 
Beauties are the attraction week 25 to good busi- 
ness. The first part is entitled "The Romance of 
a Suit Case," which furnishes plenty of fun, and 
the last part is entitled "A Midnight Dream." 
There are several good musical numbers that 
please. Carmenclta. famous In the old days as a 
Spanish dancer. Is the chief attraction. Others In 
the olio are the Seyons, who sing and dnnce; 
Kelley and Bartlett, acrobatic comedians; Saw- 
telle and Sears, who sing and dance. Halght and 
Dean have a sketch. James B. Carson sings paro- 
dies and the three Keeleys do some very clever 
work In bag punching. Week March 4: The Ori- 
ental Burlesquers. MAJESTIC (Fred Waldman, 

mgr.). — Week Feb. 25: Wine, Women and Song 
did big business with first part entitled "A Day at 
Niagara Falls" which Is good. The musical num- 
beri are tuneful. The Inst part Is called "Fun in 
the Subway" and gives plenty of opportunity for 
good burlesque. Olio includes Raymond and Clay- 
ton In a talking act; Frederick Brothers and Burns 
play musical Instruments; Bonlta sings acceptably 
and Howe and Scott make good In their Hebrew 
Impersonations. Week March 4: Roble's Knicker- 
bockers. NATIONAL (Dr. A. L. Flanders. 

mgr.). — Polite vaudeville to good business week 
25 with Bison Singing Trio. Fred K. Woodson, 
Illustrated songs; The Zat-Zams. magicians; M. 
Garvey, Impersonator: Dixie Harris, singer, and 

E. B. Dupree, Swedish momdoglst. YALE'S 

(Lloyd Brown, mgr.). — Week 2.1: Good business 
with Fields and Towner. DeVaro and Thomas, 
Zalno, the magician, and The Wlnstanleys. 

FAIRPLAY. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

GAYETY (W. L. Ballauf. mgr.1.— Week 26: 
Charles II. Waldron's Trocadero Burlesquers were 



well received by large audiences. The numbers 
were frequently encored, which made It necessary 
to cut the program in several places, and the 
management had to request the audiences to al- 
low the performance to continue. "The Misfit 
Family," a clever comedy, was the opening sketch, 
followed by a very strong olio, tbe main featute 
of which was Brlnn. the English strong man, in 
juggling feats, the best of which was the balanc- 
ing of a large cannon, carriage and all, on his 
chin and firing it off. The Wilsons, blackface 
comedians, were kept going until tbelr repertoire 
was exhausted. The Grahams appeared in a new 
and novel sketch, which was strictly up to-date. 
Mae Taylor with songs and Mackle and Walker in 
"Scenes from Everyday Life" made up the bal- 
ance of the olio, and "Fun in the Hotel Astor- 
bllt" ended the performance. 

MONUMENTAL (Jos. Kernan, mgr.).— Week 
26: John Grieves' Parisian Belles to fair business. 
One of the best performances seen at this house 
this season. The entertainment opens with the 
sketch, "The Sultan's Wives," and is full of go 
and ginger. In the olio are Kitty and Harry 
Sattoll In the farce, "All of a Twist"; BurnB and 
Morris, Irish comedians; The Mound City Quartet; 
the Three Marvelous Heumans, comedy cyclists, 
and I .a Belle Marie, who is quite clever In a loose 
wire—apaclalty. The feature of the performance 
was a patriotic interlude and tableau, "The Na- 
tional American March." The closing nnmber is 
"The Girl from Manila," all the members of the 
company taking part. During both burlettas a 
chorus of pretty girls are Introduced with new 
songs. Note. — Harvey Parker and Fred Beel, 
America's premier wrestlers, are meeting all 
comers. I. LOWENSTEIN. 



Navajo 

Lillian 

ovation 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

The week opened with big business at all local 
houses Sunday. On Monday a snowstorm, the 
most violent in recent years, stopped street car 
tratfic for several hours. The storm came up 
during matinee time. At most of the theatres 
the performers were unable to leave for their 
hotels. During the evening an army of cleaners 
were put at work and by the time the night per- 
formances were over affairs had assumed normal 
conditions. 

COLUMBIA (Frank Tate, mgr.).— Tbe 
Girls easily carried the headline honors. 
Sieger, a leader in the act, received an 
in her cornet renditions. Thorne and Carleton 
were great in their rapid fire repartee. Miss Eva 
Westcott and company in the playlet "An Episode 
in Modern Life" made quite an Impression. Keno, 
Welch and Melrose; Tom Brown, Harry and Msy 
Woodward, Dick Lynch. Gladdon and La Vine, 
and Marlon and Deane were all good in their offer- 
ings. 

GAYETY (O. T. Crawford, mgr.).— J. Herbert 
Mack's World Beaters filled the house twice dally. 
The show is devoid of vulgarity or objectionable 
features and gives satisfaction. Qulgg, Mackey 
and Nickerson acquitted themselves with credit 
In their novelty musical act. Jerome and Morrison 
sing catchy songs and carry themselves gracefully, 
others In the olio who made good were Nlblo and 
Spencer. McFarland and McDonald and Bohannon 
and Corey. ______ 

STANDARD (Leo Relchcnbach, mgr.).— The 
Dreamland Burlesquers with Jolly Zeb and a gi»od- 
ly bunch of feminine beauty pleased. The Six 
l'mplre Girls were something of an Innovation. 
Zeb and Johnson should cut out their double 
entendre. Lewis Pritzkow is an exceptionally 
clever singer and yodler but mars his act by 
springing gags that were printed in almanacs 20 
vears ago. 

NOTES. — Tom Miner was a St. Louis visitor 
Monday. Frank Logan did remarkably good work 
ahead of the World Beaters. Harry and May 
Woodward, the "sunburnt rubes" will play East 
after they close on the Castle circuit next week. 
Basil Cother Webb, who has l*>en playing the 
halls In London, has returned to St. Louis. He Is 
engaged with Fighting the Flames for the sum- 
mer season. JOE PAZEN. 



CLEVELAND, CHIO. 

KKITII'S (H. A. Daniels, mgr.).— Week of 26: 
Bill here this week Is hardly up to standard. 
The three Herzog-Camaras. equilibrists, did fairly 
well. The Maxsmlth Duo, Introducing dancing 
ladders; Harry Atkinson. Imitator of musical In- 
struments: Linden Beckwith, the singing portrait; 
Bailey and Austin, comedy acrobats : Phil and Net- 
tle Peters, eccentric comedy; Nina Morris In 
sketch, 'A Friend's Advice"; Halladay and Leon- 
ard, Irish comedians, and the pictures. LYRIC 

<K. R. I*ang. mgr. ) .- -Ferarl's animals for the 
first time In vaudeville are making good at this 
house. The Garnellaa, comedy acrobats, fair; 
Summers end Winter, singing and dancing, 
amused ; Robert Wlngate, bone soloist, good; 
Kelly and Adams, comedians, get some laughs; 
Fred C. Styles, Illustrated songs; pictures close. 
EMPIRE (C. W. Denglglng, mgr.). — The Bowery 
Burlesquers give a very fair show and they are 
too well known to say much about them. The 
audience enjoyed the opening and closing bur- 
lesque, called "Two Hot Knights" and "The Gay 
Modiste," as well B«* the olio, which consisted of 
Roberta. Hayes and Roberta, the COWboJf, the 
dude and the' lady; the Three Juggling Bannous; 
Carmellla D'F.lcedre. a posing act; the Three 
Hickman Brothers, comedy skit; Kstella Wills, 
comedienne, and Ben Jansen, vocalist. 

C. A. B. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.)— Val- 
erie Berger and company are the "odds 
folks" for week 26. Their version of ' 
men" struck the applause center. Perle 
Diamante, Spanish dancers, have an act 
runs but nine minutes. Ea telle Wordette 
company caused the orchestra to sit up 
gurgle. Flo Adler. with her boy In a 
made a hit. Watson and Morrlssey, 
and dance team; Joe Newman and Lewtl 
Cord and company till out. Business Is 
mous. BUI for week March r» Includes Pekln 
Zouaves, Grand Optra Trio, Harry I^e Claire, 
Klelit, Bryan and Nadlne, Mlrzl von Wenzl, 

and the second week of Valerie Bergere. 

OREKNWALL (Henry Grcenwall. mgr.).— Bob 
Manchester's Crackerjacks oi>ened to capacity 



on 
'Car 

and 

that 

and 

and 

DOS, 

snog 

M< 
etlor- 



Cobb's Corner 



No. i. A Weekly Wont With WILL th« Wordwright- 



It's a wise song that knows its own author. 



Old Subscriber. — No, it Is not called the Bee- 
hive tower because so many songwrltera have 
iM-cn stung there. 



BIG ANNOUNCEflENT 



Every professional singer will be benefited 
by sending me a permauent address that I can 
put on my free mailing list of new aongs. 

Do It now. 

NEW 5QNQS 



'it a Qirl Like You Loved a Boy Like Me," 

"Two Dirty Little Hands," 

"The Hurdy Ourdy Man," 

and 

"While the Old Mill Wheel la Turning Round 

and Round." 

WILL D. COBB 

WORDWRIGHT 

151a Broadway New York 



houses for week 28. They present tbe Razzle- 
Dazzle Girls and "Nature In Marble Hall," with 
Bob Van Osten as tbe laugh producer. The olio 
Includes the Clemenso Brothers, a duo of acro- 
bats and musicians; Lillian Held, singer; tbe 
(Hockcrs in a baton specialty; Shepard Camp and 
Hennings, Lewis and Hennlngs. Thelse's Casino 
Girls featuring Hal Godfrey and company for 
week March 4. NOTE.— Jake Usher, treasurer of 
the Orpheum, has a new assistant In tbe person 
of George S. Lynn. O. M. SAMUEL. 



"The 
do a 



SEATTLE, WASH. 
SEATTLE (John Cort, mgr.).— Wees 18, 
High School Girls" open S. R. O. and will 
big week. They have a good clean show. They 
have a burlesque in two acts entitled "Whirli- 
Olggle," which Is a mixture of all of tbe Weber- 
Flelds shows. Nat Fields and Sol Fields please 
with German talk. There is a good olio opening 
with the Oilman Sisters, buck and wing dancera. 
Billy Hart and Emma Weston in "Tbe Con Sport" 
and a dope fiend act, are better than any of the 
others we have had here this season. Hughes and 
Hazelton do a travesty act on "Damon and 
Pythias." The Six Flying Banvards. late of the 
King ling Bros. Circus, do a big act for stage 
work. Marie Jansen, illustrated songs; not the 
real Marie. Next week — Williams' Imperial Bur- 

leaquera. STAR (M. G. Wlnstock, mgr.). — 

Everything new at the Star this week and a Hat 
of good acts. Josephine Gassman and her picks; 
Reckless Reklew, the clown bicycle rider; Stod- 
dard and Wilson; Jones and Walton in "Our 
Country Cousin," and the starascope.— ' — OR- 
I'HKCM (Manager Dounellan). Week 18: Among 
the acts at the Orpheum are tbe Lawn Tennis 
Trio, the Three Wlscbers, Rosealle Sheldon, Smith 
and F.llis in a comedy playlet. Mr. and Mrs. 
Phelps, W. II. Stetson, baritone, and tbe Or- 

pheumscope. PANTAGES* (Alex Pantages, 

mgr.). — Week of 20: Wilson and I.elcester, Indian 
singing sketch, clever; Woods and Ralton, musi- 
cal entertalnters; Cavalry Quartet, good act of 
its kind; F. H. Stanfleld, character comedian; 
Mullaly Sisters, wooden shoe dancers; Arthur 
F.lwell. descriptive singer; Pantagescope. CEN- 
TRAL (Don C. Porter, mgr.).— Anna Abbott, tbe 
Georgia Magnet; Frank G. Smith, comedian; Vir- 
ginia Richmond, clever tinging turn; Campbell 
and Stock Slaters, Juggling act, good; moving pic- 
tures. GEE GEE BEE. 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE (Sbafer Zlegler, mgr.). 
-The bill of 2d was for the most part an enjoy- 
able one, though It had its weak features. The 
Agoust Family of pantomimic Jugglers scored in 
their novelty act "A Lively Supper at Maxim's," 
and Hallen and Fuller came in for a good share 
of favor In their latest sketch, "A Morning 
Plunge." Sydney Grant, with some new stories 
und imitations, was well received, and tbe Misses 
Del more, who formerly lived in Indianapolis, re- 
ceived much flattering attention during tbe week, 
several big theatre parties being given in their 
honor. Their father was among the early theatri- 
cal managers of this city. A clever little com- 
pany of Japs Is the Namba Troupe and they gave 
a good performance. Koichl Namba la the young- 
est and tiniest acrobat In the world. He la only 
tlve years old and this was his first appearance 
on the stage. He didn't do much but stand 
around and smile at his father and brothers, but 
that smile was worth going miles to see. Brown, 
Harris and Brown, In a mixture of aong and bur- 
leaque. The World's Comedy Four, in their sing- 
ing act. and Fredo and Dsre, the comedy musi- 
cians, were fairly successful. Next week Fanny 
Rice, a great local favorite, heads the program. 

LOUIS WESLYN. 



READING, PA. 
BIJOU (Updegraff A Brownell, mgra.).— Week 
of 26 Fred Irwin's Majesties greeted an lminemv 
audience. There are two new burlesques brln 
ful of novelties with new songs and music. T' 
opening Is a musical farce. "Down the Line 
The olio Is replete with novelties. Maude Harv 
and Evelyn Walker, singers of cstehy songs, fa*. 
Three Konnys, a Eurof»ean musical novelty, w« 
received. Fnrron and Fsy in "The Last Quart 
good hit. The Majestic Trio. Gertie De Mil 
Kitty Watson, Fanny Watson, singers and dai 
cers, good hit. Qulnlan Brothers and Buckle; 
club Jugglers, big hit. The performance closv 
with the musical absurdity "For Girls Only.* 

Week of March f> New York Stars. ORPHEUS 

(Frank D. HI\L rngr.).— Week 20 Aldo and Ar 
mo ur. grotesque knockabout bar comedians, fair 
Le Roy and Woodford, conversationalists, well re 


















. • 









12 



VARIETY 



cejvcd. A. o. Duncan, vont rllo^juih t , lilt, "In the 
Sunny South." by u company of ten, big Lit. 
Karaej » Myiopbouc, musical novelty, well le- 
Oeived. M.ii (In ws iiii'l Ashley, "A Suiashup lu 
Chinatown, ' kept tin- audience lu good liimiur. 
11)11 .and Kylvauy, tun. > .lists, good hit. kuiclo- 
giaph pictures. Week March .". Josephine L'obuO 
In tut; musical fanr, "I- inlay tin- l.ith." lied 
Nlblo, UUVI mill Ala /.el, Sluiilcy ana Wilson, 
Caprice. Lynn and Fay, Cuvnua, Henry ami Ceil. 

LEVI'. 



PITTSBURG, PA. 
Till: GRAND I Harry Duvis, mgr.) — The leading 
feature! this need are cm .■epiionaliy good. 
••Jimmy" — 1 beg pardon — James T. I'hwcih tan 
probably be called i he headline!-, sud his Vaude- 
ville satire "Dicainiug" Went with a rush. 1 he 
skit la clever with charming music— nod rowers 
endeavors lo make as good lu vaudeville as lie 
did lu comic ojieiu mid succeeds, the Barrow s- 
_ I. H ii riiHlei jCui up u uy .^*!^uu Uiou -OHe-syet: eomedy- 
drama " •Tactic*" ami give a Mushed performance 
tliat arouses tlie audience to real enthusiasm. 
Julian hit Inge's fcuiiniue charade! izathma wcie 
dainty and entirely free from any revolting fea- 
ture*. Julian threw in a corset ad. for good 
measure. Belle Stone, wnu Ueues the la us of 
gravity, euiers a steel ball und cause* it lo roll 
up and then down a spiral track. Her act went 
well. Solomon the s«c.. ml in mathematical feati 
made a big bit. Mollie Ryan, the singer of Irish 
song*, who is retained tor another week in re- 
Spouse to numerous requests, made even a better 
impicK.sn.ii than last week. John Dclmore and 
Euilly Darrell lu comedy, Singing and dancing 
were fair. Mr. Dcliuore's Imitation of Carrol 
Johnson iu the beat feature and his making up in 
blackface in view of tuv, audi, nee while continu- 
ing his monologue wa* ra'ther novel. Annie May 
Abbott, Hie Geoigla Magnet, mystiticd the audi- 
ence as usual with her strange feats. The Three 
Madcaps cau do good work, thuugu, they are not 
tbe original •Madcap*," but they need a Stage 
manager and the services of a good laundry. Boh 
and Oeorgc guigley have a fair Irish act; their 
political talk Is clever, but it 1* followed by leu 
or tlfteen minutes of cheap Jokes about a man's 
wife being killed by a trolley which grates on 
tbe more Intelligent part of tbe audience. The 
White City Quartet gave a dismal act by them- 
selves but afterward assisted James T. Cowers lu 
bis sketch ami made a very favorable Impression. 
Za/.i-l and VerilOU are clever pauloiiiimlsts; Mar- 
tin Brothers made good in xylophone duet*. Ex- 
celleut moving pictures round out a great bill. 

IuimetiBC audiences. GAYETY i James E. Orr. 

mgr.). — The reception tendered Rice & Burton's 
Extravaganza Company amounted to an ovation 
yesterduy. 'I "hey appeared in a musical farce, "A 
Night at Coney Island," lu two editions and three 
scene*, which wa* really funny and full of catchy 
song* snd clever dialogue. Charles Barton. Bert 
Baker. George II. Noland nnd a number of others 
bad gtiod comedy parts anil tbe chorus was ex- 
cellent. The piece 1* not thrown together like 

tu6 ... diii.i i y i.iiiititn but is a geUUilie comedy 

requiring real acting. Tunny Vedder as a Coney 
Island headliner made a bit with her song*. Bert 
Baker, as an Irish hodcarrier, has a Hue voire and 
bi* SOUgS were well received. Bertha A. llnlleu- 
beek- sang ballads lu a pleasing la-iuott. A min- 
strel trio, Lemuel*. Monoban and Nolan, did clever 
work. Goldsmith snd lloppe had a musical turn 
which Was tnucb liked. lteu/.etta and l.a Bue 
gave a novel acrobatic act and the Pescbkoff 
Troupe of Russian Dancer*, who are an added at- 
traction this week, did extraordinary work. 

Packed houses. ACADEMY ill. W. Williams, 

Jr., ingr.l. — Miner's Merry Burleaquers attracted 
two big house* yesterday. They gave two skits. 
"A Jumble of Nonseuse" snd "A Night on the 
Bowery.*' Neither wa* up to the standard. Al- 
though there were occasional clever line* for the 
couicdlot.s snd a few good musical numbers, they 
lacked the snap necessary to a burlesque enter- 
tainment. Comedians, singer*, dancers and the 
chorus worked bard but the skits wire not great 
successes. Some features of Hie olio, however, 
were well worth seeing. M. P. Nlhbc and Mario 
Bordouex gave a sketch, "The Man With the 
Broom." that hns some commendable features. 
Nlbbf sings well and there was some good com- 
edy. The Da Toy Brothers, comedy acrobats and 
barrel Jumpers, did good work. Clover, IligglUS 
and Bergman in Singing and dancing act Were 
well liked, especially Mildred 'novel's songs. 
Hickman and Coleman do a talking turn that Is 
great. Yuma Is a great puzzle — be Is either a 
clever acrobat or a great feat of automaton Ism. 
Jennette Dupre. the clever little musical soubrette, 
who only joined the company this week, sang 
some songs effectively and dances well. Billy 
Nohike. who ended the olio, made perhaps the 
biggest hit. He is a coonebouter nnd has a good 
singing voice. HI* song* were Illustrated with 
humorous pictures. MADAME PITT. 



WICHITA, KAN. 

Bijou (Curl E. Olson, mgr.).— BUI week 2d. 

Iladjl I.esslk, the whirlwind Arabian ffunsplrmer, 

opened show; novelty act nnd pleased; Little 

itbel Msyhcll sang Illustrated song, •Way Down 

n*t." very pretty: Hart Trio In Comedy sketch, 

Chappie's Visit," and Impersonations of great 

ten. past and present, were very good; hlogrspb 

osed the show. S. R. O, sign every night. 

OTE. The Davis children were substituted In 
ice of Frances Fotsom r who missed her train 

•d failed to arrive in time. LYRIC (Wilson 

Cox, nigra.).- Hill Edmunds Trio, Illustrated 
us George A. Kerebaw, Lyrlcunmc Good 
Iness. A. C. RACE. 



FALL RIVER. MASS. 

■IKFDY'S (M. R. Sh It, mgr. C. E. Cook. 

'mgr.).— Week of L'<;. the Ib-l Raven Cadets, 

liners this week, led by Ml-s Hilda Carle. 

:'d big bit. The TetiR Troupe nf Oriental Won« 

pleased, ns did (lllroy, lln.vne* snd Mont- 

.cry. the Dive Romano*, Monroe. M icK and 

vrenee and Deter the Croat. Adautlhl -Taylor 
j- raMier a weak act. Attendntice big, Nexl 
»k. Clayton White nnd Marie Sttiirr. the VII- 

e Choir. Biate lie Kloan. \. '•. Duncan, Van 

.1 Aiden, Irene Lee. SAVoV (\! Ili\ris. 

xr., Albert Haley, res. nigi i -'Ills week's 
<ov Is below the pvernge hills seen st this 
nse. Delia Fox lias the headline act, but was 



received coldly. Charles Guyer and Beth Stone 
are the bit ol the bill. The Suiiuoi* troupe of 
acrobats do some marvelous work, others on the 
bill were Ueorge B. Alexander, Billy Link ami 
compauy, Jean Ar.lclle and her Inky Dluk* and 
Komers and Law, Hhow closed vxitu picture*. Big 
bouse it each performance. Mann f>, lime, llerr- 

uuiiin. Bedford and Winchester, McMahou and 
t bapt lie. Edward Orcy. Lillian Seville, Mr. and 

Sir*, i.ucier, Mi.Mabon's Watermelon Ulris. 

BOSTON tCharles kikblesluger, mgr.) .— ^Burlesque 

Ibis w«ek is good, with a btroug olio, Including 

Bob soiuet v nie, wrestler; Omar, the bumau top; 
McKeever and Ssutry, Casper ami Santry, Bthel 
Hi i lii. Ben Jobnsou, Nina seurle*. BON TON. 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (Howard Orahani, res. mgr.). — 
Crowded bouses, Week of Sitt, Jack Mason's 1'ive 
Society Belles made a vers gOod impression with 
the a in lu nee, particular ly Lilli an Doner ty, Ricb- 
aul (b. in. n, wnu ETi Eouoiogue, w a *~excei ten i ; i be " 
Four Welsoos were given a baud for their acro- 
batic work, Kitty 'lraney's icbued tinii.- novelty 
was well received; the lobin Sisters, in a reflued 
musical special ty, were good; 1-oy ami Clark, with 
...... nuhmariue skeuu, a kloderu Jouub." were 

the cans.- of uimh laughter.' \N cek Of J. Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert I • itzslinmoiis, Mary Noiinan, the Bo ley 
UlrU, irunk l.yuuc. Salerno aud other*. 



ATLANiA, GA. 
STAR (J. B. Thompson, mgr.).— Opened week 
ild with a one act comedy. "A Night in a Mad- 
house," in which W. 11. Tiuchcart, Cal Copeluud, 
Lew Uolden, Joe Collin* and John 1'. BuiKc, as- 
si>tctl by liie balance of the company, did goisl 
Work, and were well received by a lai^e auilieucc. 
Pearl Nellsuu sang some phasing songs. The UoleS 
in their comedv act were fair. Daisy Lowinan in 
illustrated song* was as popular a* ever. Oolden 
aud Coiliii*. musical comedians, average. Marty lie 
Sisters, novelty soiiys and dances, caught the 
crowd. The Three Raymond Sisters were tavoriles 
a* usual, and with the new moving pictures the 
bill wound up with the musical comedy burlesque 
"Wiuniug a Husband," which was well received. 

BR1X. 



LAWRENCE. MASS. 

COLONIAL (II. Fred Let*, mgr. ).— Playgoers 
say the bill of lid is the best seen thus far 
thi* season, which means it 1* an exceptionally 
gOOd one. The Military Octet with Miss Rose 
Stevens as the girl with the balon easily takes 
tbe lead. Moshcr. llouubton and Sdoaher, trick 
bicycle act. are second In the pleasing line. 
Booker and Corbley, in the skit entitled "The 
Walking Delegate," find their efforts to please ap- 
preciated, ilatts ami Nelson, tricks on the re- 
volving gloiies, ^ood. The Clarence Sisters, fair. 
Lillian Bliaw In a vocal dialect act receives a 
warm reception. Dixon and Holnns, character 
singing comedians, are old favorites. For week 
of o Delia Fox. Sauuois Troupe. George B. Alex- 
ander. Jean Ardelle and her Inky Dinks. Billy 
Link and company, Charles Guyer ami Beth Stone 
aud Somers ami Law. A. B. C. 



LYNN, MASS. 



ACDITORHM (Harry KatxeS, mgr.).— Karno's 
Pantomime Company lii "A Night 111 an English 
Music Hall" made the biggest hit of the season. 
The Village Choir Went big. La vlnc-Cimaron Trio 
of acrobat* good. Biandow nnd Wiley, singing 
and dancing, ti*>k well, Oorraan and West, only 
fair. The" Be M'uths, whirlwind dancers, should 
dance more and talk less. Nation Jacques, come- 
dienne, fair. Big business. Wei-k of March T», 
Monroe, Mack and Lawrence. Reno, Richards and 
company, Henry Taylor and others. DAVE. 



EVANSVILLE. IND. 

BTJnn (George Bellinger, mgr.).— Bill week of 
IS: Carson nnd Wlllsrd present an original sntlre 
on "Friz/led Finance" that took Well. The rest 
Of their German comedy was the same as they 
Used when here Inst year Pt the People's In "A 

Trip to Egypt." Foster nm Foster In n comedy 

musical net took well, Cas tells t and Hall In a 
come.lv sketch, entitled "'Hie Wall Street 
Broker." nmle good, as did Cora Beech Turner. 
comedienne. William Windoin. ns n colored nurse 
girl, took well lie appeared nt Cook's Dark 
la^t season and was well received. The I'lerres. 
equilibrists and hnnd balancers, nave an excellent 
act. but did not take ns well ns they should. 
Pope and bis trick dog were well received, as 
Was lite case w bell tbe.V appeared St Cook's I'atk 
last June. Bill week of 23 Is fair. Prof. Fred 
Macnrt's troupe of trained dogs and monkeys is 
the feature attraction. Bryan nt.d Nadlne, comedy 
acrobats and barrel Jumpers, took well, as did 
Margnrel Newton, monologlst. LaZar nnd LsZar 
plea set] In their comedy muslesl set. ICslacrstls, 
Juggler, has a good act. but did not take well, 
Blnney and Chapman, singers and dancers, failed 
to plesae nnd Harry Jolson, Impersonator, to..k 
only fairly well. The (Treat Powell, magician, 
bends the bill of March 4. 

ROBERT L. ODELL. 



MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

ORPTIKT'M (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.).— The 
nrnneum road show Is again exemplifying the 
nblllty of the general manager of the Orphiuim 
Clrcull Compsny to BSsemHIe n bill that will pai-k 
the house twice daily In tbe face of strong oppo- 
sition, with 1-< MV Fields pinvlng Nt ft.. VI at the 
Metropolitan and "Sweet Kitty Bellnlrs" at the 
Same prb-o at the Auiltorlum and various other 
hon«cs tnnkiug pxtraorillnnry bids, Honors arc 
pretty well divided lietweeh Ye Colonial Septette 
in ",\n old Tv.mo Hallowe'en." Winona Winters, 
whose voiiM iloquhtn goes particularly strone, snd 
Merlan's ■' gs een hero two years ago. niileb go 
bigger than ever. Jules and I'.Ua Harrison u'ct 
away big with "Art Ancient Roman." although It 
Is not of the scream variety. Rdcnr Bttley gets 
bis -tare. The Sisters and Brothers Ford make 
a tremendous bit with their bard shoe dancing, 
and Campbell - '"d Johnson's nmedy Acrobatic nnd 
hi ••. clc work opens tbe show with n msh. Note 
The buildings on the site of the new St Caul 
Orphenm have been razed ami the foundation is 
under way. CHAliN. 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 
HATHAWAY S t'F. B. Baylies, mgr.) .— GtK>tl 
audiences. Show opens quietly but hiiifches strong. 
Walter C. Kelly's monologue the bit of Hie SUOW 
with the Hr.>t day audiences. His presentation of 
a scene in a Vliginia police com t is very good. 
Eddie Leonard, assisted by the .sharp Brothers, 
presents an excellent Southern singing and danc- 
ing sketch. The Patty Brothers are exceptionally 
line head balancers. l'Htrice, Hie feature per- 
former of the show, in a .Western playlet. 
"Gloria," fair. Foster und his trained dog Mike 
open the show. the others are Irene Lee, the 
girl In trousers, ami giska ami King, magic, both 
mediocre* Vitagraph pictures. KNOT. 



GL0VERSV1LLE, N. Y. 
FAMILY THLAIRi: tired Do Botidy, ns. 
mgr.). — Week of -b. Florence lagan ami com- 
pany. In u sketch cut. t led "Jack's Brother's Sis- 
ter"; Cn a ulngbu m and Smith, reekle«i comedy 
tumbling; Wilsou-Lowamle, one ring circus; lal- 
win Adair lu topical sotigs, Devlin ami Blwood 
and Edith la-set If reviewed Under Hew Mctt<. 

THE Al.sLE SEAT FIEND. 



SALT LAKE CUY, UTAH. 

BON TON (J. 11. Young, mgr.). -Week 19, 
Garyeeno, the human bat, Mr. and Mrs. D. M. 
Hall, in songs; band oi Indian.-, in song- und 
dances; Illustrated song and kluetoseope. D. M. 
Hall was especially clever wuu ni.s cigarettes. 
Big business all week and good show. S. It. O. 
on Saturday. ORI'HEIM (Jules F. Bistes. local 

mgr.), — Week IV) a good bill was presented* lu- 
eluding Wynne Wiusiovv, .-oprauo; Mr. and Mrs. 
Allied Kelcy, in *i m ie Fhiiica.s," a clever farce; 

Trash and Rogers, tlain ing ami singing; J. A. 
Murphy and l.loi-e \\ illaitl in '" i'lie I'reuoldglst, " 
went well; Mile. Chester's |lo,uO0 Statue Dog cap- 
tivated the audieine; the kluodrome lu new pic- 
tures pleased. Good bouses all week. LYRIC 
(W. A. Moss, mgr. i. -Week' IT, Miner's Ameri- 
cans lu "A Vankee Doodle Girl," and olio, with 
Joe Goodwin, Fruuk Fisher and Gladys Clark, May 
Butler, Bette, Beyuohis ami 1 ox and mot ion pic- 
tures. Oood business und show. s. R. O. ou Sun- 
day. JAY E. JOHNSON. 

MUNCIE, IND. 

STAR (C. R. Andrews, mgr. ). -Week LV'». Ar- 
thur and Bessie Kroua. in "The Dude of the Vil- 
lage"; Frank Gray sings; Theo. Junius, expert, 
band balancer; Albert l.cnnaul, novelty dancer; 
Mr. ami Mrs, Nick Hughes, comedy sketch artists; 
the Staroscope. GEO. F1FER. 

PAWTUCKET, R. i. 

NEW PAWTVCKET. — Week W. packed houses 
the rule this week. Lew and Millie Plotti, in a 
singing act, witii character ».ng-. Eugeue Euuett, 
in singing after the style of the late Frits Eni- 
mett; May BoW'e, dam Ing and singing; the Turn- 

~mm I.. n -I- • f I.* \f...» I.,,. ..i,. In .11.. * . . I . .... ■ vo • 

the Lowrys in a new sketch, with special scen- 
ery and effect, base a u.s.d act; Waisous mov- 
ing pictures pleased, ami the bill concludes with 
Ed I.owry's' afterpiece, "Barnes' Troubles." by 
the -whole company. ■ 1S1CK. - 



TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (I, Shea, mgr. |. —One of the best bills 
of the season was presented during the week. 
The Fadette Ladies' Orchestra met wllh popu- 
lar approval; Alice Pierce's inipersotia t buis of 
popular artists Were good; Harry Tate's company 
presented ••.Motoring." Others -vere May Duryea 
and W. A. Mortimer. ReilT Brothers. Flttgibbon 
and McCoy Trio and the klnetngraph. Business 

up to the usual high average. STAB '•' W. 

Stair, mgr.). — The Dainty Farce Burlesqueri 
pleased the lar.Ce clientele. "The Maliiage of 
Birdie" and "A Merry Bachelor" opened ami 
closed the bill. Orville and Frank are clever 
equilibrists; Ethel Went and Madge Hughes made 
good In a clever si. etch; the Hydes did well In a 
sketch: Trio (hrluw, In a sensational acrobatic 
turn, were the feature. Tom ley nnd Dunn are 
good dancers. - NOTi;. Cms P. Thomas, an old 
Toronto boy, Is With "Little Johnny Jones" nt the 
Princess this week. UURTLEY, 



LOUISVILLE. KY. 

IIOPKINS (Win. Relchtnann, res. tngr.>.— A 
good bill Is presented tliis week, beaded by the 
PlrlscolTos |n -a- Juggling- novelty. I loch I'.ltofl 
company falrlj sucessful In a sketch, "Mile. 
Rice!." Willy Zimmerman, imitations, good; 
World and Kingston, In a singing and dancing act; 
Avery Straknseh. singer, hit; T. Nelson Downs, 

the King of Kolns, -ucceeded III lll.vstifvlng bis 

audience, while Charlie Case received his full 
sharp of laughs. Kiuodrome closes the show. 
Vote.- -An effort WHS blade to 'lose the theatre 
here pn Sundav. which re-ultcd In tbe arrest of 
a number of actors and managers, who were Im- 
mediately released tm bond. The arrests In no 
way interfered with the show. All Cases were 
dismissed In Court Monday morning, and ns a 
consequence theatres will continue to run on 
Sundav. ARTIU'R BTUABT. 



( WATERBURY, CONN. 

JACQUES i.I. W Fltspatrlck, mgr.).— The fea- 
ture this week Is "Pals." n condensed version of 
a forni"r three act production. Hal Davis, Inez. 
Maeanlcy and company gave n creditable produc- 
tion of the playlet. Tom Ibarn. the la/.y Juggler, 
pleased, as did tbe Transatlantic Four, although 
better quartets have sung here. Rckoff ami 
Cordon pleased in n musical a.t. the male member 
of the team being aided by "Biff." Manager Fits- 
Patrick's !>ull pup. who L'ot loose rnesday nfier- 
noon and ln-i-ted on Joining tbe clarinet playing, 
Ibis was an added feature the resl t»f the week. 
I. ul-.e Henderson, a local man (see New Acts), 
failed to please. I'nkln and Patterson, colored 
singers, pleased. Tbe show opened with the Car- 
son Brothers In plaster po*e*, which were good, 
but would have been better bad t! toy closed their 
acts Inside the frame they use rather than step- 
ping to the footlights, which spoiled the Hln-lon. 
Pictures closed the hImwv, Attendance good. 

ARTHLR 11. McKECHNTE. 



NOTES FROM NEW YORK STARS CO. 

Harry Aimer, wito bus been our leader Mince tbe 
opening of tbe Benson, leaves us Suturday night. 
much to tlM regret of the performers lu general. 

We have Willi us two chorus ladies who will 
rise fioui the ranks and become a full tiedged 
sister act. They will work under the team name 
of Howard ami Le Roy. 

The Majestic Musical Four played the York- 
\ilie Theatre last Sunday night. They have re- 
ceived u consignment of four new cornets which 
they will add to their act iu the near future. 

11. A. SIMON. 



KEOKUK, IOWA. 
LA SALLE (Budge ft Reeves, props.).— Week 

of iu; Business good, The Musical Foys as bead- 

liners scored heavily. Robertson's trained dogs 
also pleased. Alum Robertson pleases with his 
Illustrated songs. La Salle, week of Uti. offers 
Kditb Richards in a novel U musical act as head- 
liner; Barring ton, the veutriloqulst; Oil Brown, 
singing und talking comedian; Altou Robertson. 

lUust rated .songs, ami the Biograph. orand 

oi'ERA liotM-; (Chamberlain & Harrington, 
mgrs.). Feb. 23: Amateur mlustrela, glveu by 
the Keokuk High HcbooL packed theatre to the 
doors. Performance Hue. Biiiy smuii, locul boy, 
deserves spcoui mention in position as end man. 

FRANK SANSON B. 



POUGHKEEFblE, N. Y. 

1 AMILY (hi. B. ftwcel, mgr.).— BUI week UU 

hcaucU by Aiiloinu Uuveio Iwoy.tl liuliau BanU, 
gtioti. l.lllici.-a ana Lee, singing coiuciilc lines, mil} 
lair. A. it. Burton, mouo.o^i&i, maue gooU. Hills 
uml W ilbou, ctteuiric siiq,tis ami Uaoccis, good 
turn, tulumbia ^tfuilei, oig hit. litKxl biugiug 
una couittiy, u suoog vuuueviiic uuini.ci. £scoll 
uml Joiiu.-oti, coiuu:U couu tii.tus, wcil leccived. 

alotiuu pictures. W. C. MATT'aiUM. 



YONKEttS, N. Y. 
DuRlC (Henry Aiyera, mti.-^- - v g'""d bill here 

Mouuuy to a p. »ii. ca house. 1 in' .Vtiams Ouo 
Uj.cn. a the but. .ui'. Auuui.s impeisuuafces s num- 
ber Ol Well Known Hull ol tin. past ami plcAellL, 
lite UCl pica. -.11. llootillla anti iitiiamuu, a sing- 
ing outi, na>c gotui voices aim a.e very uiceij 
co.-uiiucu, u pn ...-log at i. Sillier, Urowiuug ana 
couij..ito lu ' luugiil, U goou sutl.cn, Wcul well. 
1- e ....- ami Wooiij, the un u ill UlS aiioiup, went 

Vely Sll'UUga 1 lie Aloel'lJS, llUIIU HUH lead Usl 

ant cts, went Weil. Ai.ty W am, hinging tuui. ul 
t ....• , uml vt ry strong, lue Aluviicus co.iitu^ 
1 our weic u un. an Carlisle's pomes uiitl to*SJ» 
wtiit good, ine pictures wcie goou. i»u»nie».s 

g..oil. LlUilL.. 



SCHENECiAiHf, W. Y. 
MOHAWK iJoaeph Weber, res. nigr.i. — Oood 
buaiiit.-a t .'lilllinca. vVevg gU, luud J utt^t* lamiiy 
ol .vtionala, l..ir. bautue, il '.\ciil a. i.i Veia lu 
"The Annul ol Kniy .uauuu)," good. Oan 
aim Alien, plantain, amgcia auu u. inula, given u 

baud, i .uy s i.cnimc yuiuiet maue s ian tmpres 

sum. \\ line ti.nuoci, ,-naUuiai uilial, excciiiiit. 
.Ni,.Uie l.ia iii'Un, ain B ui B couii illeunc, lull. CU1'- 
iui aud .Qtt_uii 1 . 'un lap couicmuna, — +.uua. v. loac d 

wnu moiioii pniuics. \\ . . k ... i ore Sisters, 

llaihu i.iMii I no, lobiu nisiers, l-iaiicelU unit 
Lew la, UuuOVSU und Aiiioitl, ."-■ml uuu Joousuii, 
Bllslol B ponies. MAKil.U 



SAN ANlO^iO, TEXAS. 

MA.icsnc t^. h. tiunugn, mgr.).— Week ol 

-."., .\iycib ami Rosa, alinongn a uew act Willi Oils 
uiitiuiite, wnil wuu a Vliil. l.amonl s Cochamo.- 
Wcic ail to tin' gtiOU. ilei oclt .Uiuncil. ^ollga ami 
sloins, met wuu appioval. June Loui'liiope coin 
puny Bcoied a OA'clnili nil hclc on Hull BCCOUd 
time tnia acason. UuUllll liioLuers, iiumi ami ncau 

baiauciug, good, s. v..r Uroiuers, comeUiaus, scored 

Wie illgaSt'SI bit since Oocnillg ol bullae. HiUa- 

tiaicii soii^i* and JuujeSlogiapU verj good. Ntnt.. 
Sevot l.itiliicis aie tonlcuijilauiig aigiiliig witu 
the \\ i /.it id ol O/. company .No. 1 lux I season. 



BATTLE CHEEK, MICH. 

BIJOU (\V. S. Bultcllield, mgr.), — Howard Dot- 
sou, ai.vlcd L'iay Modeler and Muohe AiUst. good. 
!• lore me Nei.-i.u, Illustrated songs, local, good. 
Ataiiicli s .Mai louet ti s, a big novdly, pleasUig 
every uutiy, Aduisou and Livingston iu u little skit 
"A Debut in Vaudeville," pieusiug. The Sprsgu- 
ellos, a musical uc( called "Saiuu's Pastime," 
music pretty good, big bit, L'liuetoscope closes. 

N. RITCHIE. 



UTICA, N. Y. 

ORFHEl M (E. L. Koneke, res. mgr.).— Bill 
week 1 t b. ^t.i is beaded by Edward Bldudell in a 
sketch culled "The Lost Boy." lu which be Is a.-- 
sisicd by lona Katnciiiic and Bertha Willsea. 
BioudelFs makeup la suiusing and bis humor is 
highly enjoyable, Tbe Uolden Gate (Julutet t»f col- 
ored people received much applause. Ma/nz ami 
Manet made a lu^ hit. Beii Meyers opens the 
slew with an cquilihrisilc act. Henry and Pearl, 
blackface musical comedians, play a number of 
Instruments and between selections work lu some 
fairly good comedy. Joseph Kuue Is on tbe bill 

and falls to satisfy, Klnctogruph pictures con- 
clude me "bow.—- AMERICAN ill. S. Hall, les- 
see and Uigr. >. — Bill he. id. d by Tstlus in Oriental 
oddities. who was well received. Hi It'll West 
sings songs well. "A Country Judge," a sketch 
by Harris ami Beauregutde, afforded go'al enter* 
tainiueiit. Lu Clair and West woe seen to gootl 
adv. nitage in a A Diop Iulo Society." A com- 
edy musical sketch was presented by Kohlcr and 
Mai inn. Well received. S.ilne RoaciC III Hebrew 
impersonations, fair. American moving pictures 
Close Show. SETAB. 

YORK, PA. 

PARLOR CI. J. I'.vle. mgr.). An excellent bill 
week of 20 is packing the house at every per- 
for uia uce. Demon hi and Bell, grotesque artists, 

head the bill and make u I. .1 .' \Y . Harrington, 

dialect niiuin. Me. hit. Edward K. Csssaday, II- 
lustiated songs, good, Esmeralda, xylophone solo- 
ist, fair. Cullies De Caiuo and Ws dog Cora 
take well. winning applause. Thv Three De 
Groans lu '"The Inventor," gootl. Moving pictures 
fair. TBIX1B. 



VARIETY 



13 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

HARTFORD OPERA HOUSE- (Jennings A 
Graves, muni.). — Week Feb. 26, Wood and Ward, 
comedy juKKling and hoop rolling; Hensen and 
.lames, sinking und dancing act; Marie J an sen 
was In tine voice ami greatly pleased; Wlllard 
Newell and company In "I^uat Night." were a suc- 
• i'-s; Duffy, BawteUe nml Duffy, acrobats, were on 
Mils program, but only one of the performer* 
appeared; Vernona Jarlteace sang and gave reel 
tatlous; Metcalf, Paddock nnd Edwards gave a 
pleasing musical act; the Great Alexander, fe- 
male Impersonator pleased; the Wonderful Spllk 
Is a new act in which a bicyclist rides on a 
funnel shaped track over a cage containing three 
lions: very startling and brought forth a great 
ileal of applause. POLI'S i Louis E. Kilby, ingr.l. 
-Week Feb. 2fl. Lucille Saunders, a former Hart- 
lord girl, proved a drawing card and pleased at 
each performance; Jackson family of bicyclists 
did some of the finest work ever seen in this city; 
the Dixie Serenaderg were good and closed with a 
minstrel first part; Harry La Rose and company 
in "The Sailor and the Horse" was very funny; 
Chassino. the European shadowgraphlst, pleased; 
a sketch by Godfrey and Henderson, fair; Couture 
and Gillette, comedy acrobats, good; the electro- 
graph pleased the little ones. 

W. H. RHODES. 



8ANTA CRUZ, CAL. 
(Mrs. 0. W. AllHky. mgr.) 



show. The Seminary Girls head the program, a 
, burlesque "urn with catchy songs and a little 
comedy. The two Warren sisters head the Gaiet\ 
Stock Company. One of the good numbers and the 
first time in Tope k a was "Phroso," a mechanical 
novelty operated by electricity. Herman Thomp- 
son sings the picture ballads. The stock company 
are Ruth Allen. Florence Lane, May Monte, Myra 
Warren, Ix>ralne McNenl, Florence Musgrave, 
.Jewel Drape, Nellie Morris and Kittle Rumford. 
A farce comedy, "The New ."ludge." is the pro- 
gram 



Kane 
from 
srtme 



week 24. CRAWFORD (Crawford & 

nigrs.) — Good business, hooking entirely 
the Sulllvan-Considlne circuit and offering 
good attractions. LOUIS H. FRIEDMAN. 



verv fair show week of 19. 



offers a 
Powers and Freed, 



POTTSTOWN, PA. 

GRAND OPERA HOFSE, -William Porter. Jr., 
of Oswego, N. Y., succeeds W. H. Haker as mana- 
ger. Rill for 20-38 includes the Three Graces in 
an amusing turn: Hyde and Heath in a sketch, 
"A Load of Hay"; Rreint Hays, hanjolst, Is a 
good banjolst: John ait«r] Mamie Conroy, an eccen- 
tric comedy nnd dancing act; Harry Oreen, illus- 
trated songs. L*wrenee Trio present a trick 
house act called "Moulin La Chateau." The 
kinetograph closes the show. Business good. 
March 1-3, the Three Alarcorns. the Mexican Trio 

and six other acts. AUDITORIUM FAMILY 

THEATRE (Drown & Kinney, mgrs. ).— Week of 
IP: Business excellent. Week of Feb. 20: Mat- 
thews. Jugglers, are great. Flips and Ix>retta, 
colored comedians, made a hit. Mr. and Mrs. 



opened the program and pleased; LeMaire and 
l.cMaire have a fair comedy act; The Halsworths, 
musical and dancing turn, clever; Teddy Sim- 
mons and Dorothy Warde In the sketch "A Curi- 
ous Cure" won much applause; Tommy Burnett 
•sng sweetly, and the Buckeye Trio in an aero 
bath- act "In a Tramp's Dream" were good. The 
Parkoscope wound up the bill. NOTE.— Fran- 
c.s.a Redding billed as headllner for the week 
was taken sick and will appear later. 

L. T. BERLINER. 



LANCASTER, PA. 
NEW FAMILY (Edward Mozart, mgr.).— Bill 
for week of 20 an exceptionally strong one headed 
by Bartlet and Collins in an act entitled "Every- 
thing Their Own." which pleases Immensely. Mil- 
lar Brothers introduce their Diorama. Baby Owen 
and Co.. with Baby Owen as a little Memo in 
"Dreamland," proved a big hit. As acrobatic 
clowns the Kennard Brothers rank with the best 
of their class. Tom and Gertie Crimes as travesty 
artists are good. Alice Gleason, contralto, has a 
good voice and uses it to advantage. The Kinelo- 
graph solves the servant girl problem. 

LA FAYETTE. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

LYRIC THEATRE (Jack Hoeffler. mgr.).— Week 
•2>;-. Bill headed by the Baader-LaVelle Bicycle 
Troupe, is the headline act. Palmer and Jolsou 
come next in the "Hebrew and the Coon." Nettle 
Fields was booked and featured, but did not sp- 



here 20 to large houses. The performance starts 
with a satire in one act entitled "All In One 
Night," introducing the whole company. March 
2. • The High Rollers." J. J. M. 



HOB0KEN, N. J. 

BMP1RI (A. M. Bruggeinauii, mgr.). — Bill week 
20: Nat Haloes, nonsensical nonsense, kept his 
audience roaring. Rlccobono's horses scored a hit. 
.lames Nelll and Fdythe Chapman. In "The Lady 
Across the Hall," excellent. Ryers and Her- 
mann's pantomime made a strong hit. Helen 
Rclmer O. K. Elvira Francelli and Tom Lewis, 
assisted by John Dale, in "The Ballyhoo," fair. 
J. K. Hutchinson and company In "The Idol 
Smasher," very good. Florence and Charles 
Qregaon's anions singing travesty pleased. Next 
week: Billy Van, Smedley Sketch Club, Eckert 
and Berg. Orpheus Comedy Four, Archer's Five 
Filipino Girls, Mile. Latina, Klein and Clifton, 
Kinetograph. Business excellent. 

JOHN J. BRENNAN. 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 

TEMPLE OF VAUDEVILLE (F. E. Stouder, 
lessee and mgr.). — The bill week of 19 was good, 
hut contained one act which forbids a favorable 
comparison with the two weeks preceding. The 
Baader-La Velle Trio is far above any cycling act 
seen here. Kemp and Pearl, colored comedians, 
are a real treat. The Petet Family pleased. Rose 
and Severns are handicapped by bad material. J. 



News from 



The House Melodious " 

FITZSIMMONS 



IS SINGING AT 



•••. 



Hammerstein's Victoria this week 

THE NEWEST "EDWARDS'" MELODY—— 



I'll Do Anything in the World for You 

(BY COBB AND EDWARDS) 

Get wise and get this one. IT'S GOING TO BE THE FIRST, AND THE ONLY SUMMER SONG SUCCESS 

Gus Edwards Music Publishing Co. 

1512 BROADWAY, NEW YORK [CITY^ (Next door to Rector's) 

Also publishers of "IF A GIRI, UKE YOU IOVED A BOY WKE ME," "TWO DIRTY UTTI,E HANDS," "SOME- 
BODY'S SWEETHEART I WANT TO BE, M " IN A MTTI,B CANOE WITH YOU," "KISS ME ONCE 
MORE GOOD-NIGHT," and "WHEN THE GREEN LEAVES TURN TO GOU>.» 



H 

BODM poor 

boy soprano, 

but is more COB- 



novelty Instruments lists, plesae because they ap- 
i"-nr in clean and well fitting costumes and make 
no attempt to combine humor ami music. Rrley 
ami Late, comedy sketch artists, entertain with 
good Hue of talk, interspersed with 
"luffing. Master Willy Scott, tin 
sings some poor BOUgS very well, 
scions of ihe presence of his mother In the wrings 
than of the audience. Anita Walton, noubrette, 
need not depend On the management for her salary 
us she received several pieces of money from Ihe 
audience, Who evidently mistook her for an ama- 
teur, and not without reason, Allen Dougherty 
sluu's -I'al of Mine." Illustrated, and makes a de- 
served lilt under great difficulties, as he Is suffer- 
Ing from a severe cold and follows three singing 
Hits. Pictures good, business poor. STKVK. 



T0PEKA, KAN. 

XOVKLTY (A. II. Hag.ui. mgr.).— The Lenotre. 
Kuropean novelty, head a strong bill. Hart and 
Dillon, Instrtunentalllta nnd singers, went well. 
Lottie West Synlonda, the Irish Countess, goes 
well In stories and songs: the Voltons, society 
ncrohats, clever, The Novelty gives three per- 
formances daily and winds up with moving pic- 
tures. Business good. STAR (I* M. Gorman. 

nigr.). — l'iaylng to capacity nightly with a strong 



Stuart Harrow, smoke picture artists, are good. 
George Leh, Illustrated songs, is still popular. 
The Three Jackson*, In bag punching and boxing. 
excellent in this line. The Kinetograph ends the 
show. Business on the Increase, 

J. II. WEITZENKOBN. 

FORT WORTH, TEXA8. 

MAJESTIC (Charles It. Fisher, res. mgr.).— 
Week 19: Good crowds lo sec an evenly balanced 
show. Tegge ami Daniel, German comedians, were 
a good opening number. Illustrated songs. The 
IVwslng Austins. Jugglers and dancers, were very 
clever and amusing. I'ro/.onl, accordion player, 
received repeated encores. Hairs and Kate Jack- 
son, sketch. "'His off Hay," were well received. 
Mile. Pat tec. singer, was well received. Capt. 
Blccardo and bis lions were well liked for such 
an act. Motion pictures. Next Week: Mr. and 
Mrs. Gene Hughes In A Matrimonial Substitute"; 
Capt. George Auger and Llllnutlana In "Jack, the 
Giant-killer": Tom Ripley, The De Mtonlos, Miss 
llardle Langdon, Morris Mauley and liollie Ster 
ling; motion pictures and Illustrated SOUgS. 

TABBANT. 



ERIE, PA. 

PARK (M, Bels, mgr.).— A One 
large audiences week 26. The 



pear. Her place was tilled by Hurry Hill i-i 
monologue; act went big. Stelner Itrolbers do a 
'triple bar act. Pictures close the bill, Week of 
March .">: He Wide and Zeldor, European novelty 
act; Mathews and Manning. Wallace and Beach, 
Alice Lewis, Dainty Duchess. Note. — Eddie Ac k 
ernuin has Joined the I'.aadcr I.a Velle Cycle 
Troupe. Oskara and Oskars, novelty performers, 
joined the Jack Hoeffler show en tour. Burr's 
trained dogs, ponies and horses; Fred Cole, aero* 

hat. go with the .lack Hoelller tent show this 
spring. J. II. 



bill attracted 
Two lau-Taa 



TROY, N.Y. 

PROCTOR'S (W. II. Graham, rea. mgr. ). The 
bill this week Includes Le Domino Rouge In her 
dancing act, well received. Joe Morris, one of 
i hose quaint Jewish characters, caught on. Lau 
lence and Harrington, In a sketch entitled "in- 
stalments," were amusing, Milllman Trio, high 
wire performers, very good. The Mllbml Trio, 
muslrsl act, received much applause. The Eight 
Midlands. In a singing and posing act. are | leas 
|ng. Mitchell and Marron, mins trel entertainers, 
are humorous. Lavine ind Leonard, styled the 
automobile Jugglers, made a hit, the J»iU closing 
with motion pictures.— ROYAL iW. II. Duck, 
res. mgr.;.— Phil Sheridan's City Sports opened 



\V. Sherry did not seem to please. Mlna Barbour 

was unable to sing her Illustrated songs part of 

the week because of a told. Pictures close the 
bill. DK W1TTE. 



LOGANBPORT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hardle, res. mgr.).— Bill week 
of 20 Includes M. Samuels, Impersonator; Feme 
Shinier, Illustrated songs; I^g Danovos, good ; 
Crescent Quartet, amateurs; kinodrome. Busb 
ness, S. R. o. March .'», Marjoile D.inett, Jenks 
ami Clifford, Feme Shinier, Metzger, Dida, etc. 
Note Messrs. Amnions & Dubois, of the Crystal 
Circuit, have leased the old Irwin Opera House, 
at Goshen, Did., and will reopen It as a "Crystal" 
next month. UK VI DO. 



Vote Baker) the German comedian, was 
taken quite ill in, Chicago last week with 
gastritis, having to canrej his engagement 
at r 1 1 « - Olympic Theatre in that city. lit- 
is recovering, and will ojx'n at the Majestic 
at Hot Springs on Monday. 



14 



VARIETY 





arles | eonard p letcher 

CHARACTER STUDENT 




Presenting His Original Protean Novelty 

"AN EVENING WITH CHARLES DICKENS 



AND OTHER GREAT NOVELISTS 



J J 



Introducing Artistic Impersonations from the Greatest Works 
of Fiction, including his latest and ' greatest success, a 
condensation of Charles Warner's sensational one-act play, 
adapted from the French of M. Antoine, 



"AT THE TELEPHONE 



99 



FLETCHER 
The ■■ Book-Worm " 



Always Studying J 



Always Working I 



Sixth Year In Vaudeville I 

A Success In America ! 



A Success In England I 

A Success In South Africa I 
Booked In England and Australia until March, 1908 



Vroof of FLETCHE7CS Versatility and Enterprise 

REPERTOIRE 



Richard Mansfield, as "Baron Chevrial," in A Parisian Romance. 
Richard Mansfield, as "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." 
Richard Mansfield, as "Beau Brummel." 
Richard Mansfield, as "Richard III." 
Richard Mansfield, as himself, in curtain speech. 
Sir Henry Irving, as "Mathias," in the Bells. 
Sir Henry Irving, as "Robespierre." 
De Wolf Hopper, as "Wang." 
Stuart Robson, as "Bertie," in the Henrietta. 
Thos. Q. Seabrooke, as "King Pommery," in the Isle of Cham- 
pagne. 
Ezra Kendal, in Monologue. 
James A. Heme, as "Nat Berry," in Shore Acres. 
E. J. Morgan, as John Storm, in the Christian. 
Beerbohm Tree, as "Zakuri," in the Darling of the Gods. 
William Gillette, as "Sherlock Holmes." 

Forbes Robertson, as "Dick Heldar," in The Light That Failed. 
Wilson Barrett, as "Wilfred Denver," in the Silver King. 
E. S. Willard, as "Cyrus Blenkarn," in the Middleman. 
Charles Warner, as "Coupeau," in Drink. 



Charles Warner, as "Kleschna," in Leah Kleschna. 
Charles Warner, as "Paul Marex," in At the Telephone. 
President Roosevelt. 
Admiral Schley. 
Mark Twain. 
Chauncey M. Depew. 
Charles Dickens. 
Emile Zola. 
Leo Tolstoy. 
Sir Conan Doyle. 
Rudyard Kipling. 
Longfellow. 

Fagin, from Dickens' Oliver Twist. 
Bill Sykes, from Dickens' Oliver Twist. 
Grandfather, from Dickens' Old Curiosity Shop. 
Sidney Carton, from Dckens' Tale of Two Cities. 
Uriah Heep, from Dickens' David Copperfield. 
Micawber, from Dickens' David Copperfield. 
Pecksniff, from Dickens' Martin Chuzzlewit. 



IN PREPARATION 

A New One Act Comedy Sensation, written expressly for 
Mr. Fletcher, by Harry Jackson, entitled: 

11 A BREEZE FROM THE WEST " 



ROUTE 

MARCH 5, COLONIAL, NEW YORK. 
MARCH 12, ORPHEUM, BROOKLYN. 
MARCH 19, ALHAMBRA, NEW YORK. 
MARCH 26, PROCTOR'S 58TH ST., NEW YORK. 



V^tot^****^ 






VARIETY 



15 




IN COURSE OF ERECTION -«* 



NEW AND UP-TO-DATE 




musementPark 

[Nrt/V\E BEING CONSIDERED. 

MIDWAY BETWEEN 





, N. Y. 




1 

2 



TO DRAW FROM WITHIN 
A RADIUS OF 25 MILES 

SITUATED ON MAIN LINES 

Trolley Road, N. Y. Central, West Shore 
and Delaware & Hudson Railroads 



THE BEST" OF 

liodern Attractions 

PROPOSITIONS FOR SUCH 
ONLY ENTERTAINED . . 

WANTED-A MASCOT NAME 



ioo DOLLARS ioo 

Will be Paid to the Man, Woman or Child who 
may be the first to suggest the name selected. 
Names ending with "lands" such as "Happy- 
land," etc., not 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS. APPLICATIONS, ETC.. TO 



MAX ROSEN 



290 BROADWAY, 
NEW YORK CITY 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



WM. MORRIS, 




AAA 




♦ ♦ ♦ 



TTT 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY THE FOLLOWING 
LEADING VAUDEVILLE THEATRES: 



P. G. Williams' Colonial. 
P. G. Williams* Orpheum. 
P. G. Williams' Albambra. 
P. G. Williams' Novelty, Bklyn. 
P. G. Williams' Gotham, Bklyn. 
P. G. Williams' Manhattan 

lfeneh. 
P. G. Williams' Bergen Beach. 
Henry Myers', Doric, Yonkers. 
Henry Myers', Atlantic City. 
Henry Myers', Doric, Camden. 
Keeney's, Brooklyn. 
Trent Theatre, Trenton. 
Morrison's. Rockawoy. 
Henderson's. Coney Island. 
Delmllng's, Rockaway. 



Hammerstein's Victoria. 
Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 
S. Z. Poll's, New Haven. 
S. Z. Poll's, Hartford. 
S. Z. Poll's, Worcester. 
S. Z. Poll's, Springfield. 
S. Z. Poll's, Bridgeport. 
S. Z. Poll's, Waterbury. 
S. Z. Poll's, Jersey City. 
S. Z. Poll's, Scranton. 
S. Z. Poll's. Wilkes Barre. 
Sheedy's, Fall River. 
Sheedy's, Newport. 
Hathaway's, New Bedford. 
Hathaway's, Lowell. 
Hathaway's, Brockton. 
International, Chicago. 



F. F. Proctor's 23d St. 
F. F. Proctor's 5th Ave. 
F. F. Proctor's 58th St. 
F. F. Proctor's 125th St. 
F. F. Proctor's, Newark. 
F. F. Proctor's, Albany. 
F. F. Proctor's, Troy. 
Wllraer & Vincent, Utlca. 
Wllmer & Vincent, Reading. 
Warner & Vincent, Allentown. 
Weber & Rush, Schenectady. 
II. II. I. a in kin's, Toledo. 
II. II. I.niiikln's, Dayton. . 
Auditorium, Lynn. 
Whitney's, Fitchburg, Mass. 



12 WEEKS IN NEW YORK CITY WITHOUT A REPEAT, 12 



/ Telephones \ 

\1 465- 1460- 1407 Madison/ 



6 W. 28th St., NEW YORK ( 



Cable Address 
WlUmorrls 



) 



The Stars' Hea dquarters for Vaudeville 

W. L. LYKENS' VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

31 WEST 31st STREET 



M. S. BENTHAM 

The Producing Vaudeville Agent 

Booking Everywhere 



St. James Bldg. 

Phone 44SS Mad. 



NEW YORK 

Cable AddivcH FrtlxTiiiHii 



BERNSTEIN AND OHKEN 

VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 

36 West 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

BORNHAUPT 'E£r M " ,0HAL 

St. James Hldjr. Tel. 4554 Mad. So,., New York. 

IDA CARLE 

St. James Building 
SOLE BOOKINQ ACil.N I FOR 

Doilie Bell's Dancing Troupes 

Smartest Dancing Cirls In England. BIX EM- 
PIRE GIRLS on tour In America. EIGHT PRI- 
MOSES on tour in AUSTRALIA. POPPIES (8) 
and otber Troupes open after April 

GHAS. ESCHERT 

with Al Sutherland, St. James Building. 
Hooking only good acta. 

Anything There's a Dollar In 

JACK LEVY 

140 West 42d St. New York 



New York Representative 

Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 

Ab. MAYER 

VAUDIiVILLE AQENT 

Room 803, St. James Building 
B'way and 26th Street, New York 
Tel.. '<M7 Madison. 



H. B. MARINELL1 



NEW YORK PARIS 

Cable, < .1! if. 

"Helfermkh" "Uptodate Paris" 



LONDON 
Cable, 

• I It. iv i -.si iih 1- -I on don" 



St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway. 
Telephone, 2462 Madison. 

FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS £s 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Tel., 4907 Madiaon 



Cable, Myeraba 



B. A. Myers — Keller, E. S. 

GENERAL VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 

31 West 31st Street, New York 
PITROT & GIRARD 

INTERNATIONAL* 

Vaudeville Agents 

1265 Broadway, New York 

Tel., 4015 Madison. 

ALEX. STEINER 

Vaudeville Agent 

Booking Foreign and Native Acts 

St. James Building;, New York 

YOU CAN BE BOOKED 

ALBERT SUTHERLAND 

VAUDEVILLE BOOKINGS 



rii<»in' 5_'M"i Madison 



st. James BuiMiutc 



AT LIBERTY 

Electrician and Stage Carpenter, expert uie- 
cbantc, moving picture! ind effects, open for en- 
gagement. 

OTTO P. BAHN, 

late of "Mm. tflggl of the Cabbage Patch" 
('<». (Are Home Exchange, 133 Third avenue, 
N. Y. 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OF HK1H CLASS VAUDEVILLE THRATRES 

M. MKVKiii'Kf.D, j it . Pren. 

MARTIN BECK, Oneral Manager. 
FRANK VINCENT, N. Y. Representatlre. 
All Applications for Time Must be Addressed to 
C. K. mt AY. Booking Manager, 
Majestic Theatre Bldg.. Chicago, ILL 



1 6 



VARIETY 









WILLIAM COURTLEIGH 

First Appearance in Vaudeville 



IN R. C. MacCTJLLOCH'S ONE ACT DRAMA 




THIRD DEGREE 



Mr. Courtleigh in Seven Distinct Characters 



-i 



Address, 304 SECOND AVE., MEW YORK 



LONDON "MUSIC HALL" 

E7>e Great English Vaudeville Taper (WeeKJy) 

401 STRAND. W . C. 

American Representative— Miss Ids M. Carle, Room 706, St. James Building, where a 
fiie of papers can be teen and advertisements will be received 



< 
KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OF 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 

AT FOLLOWINO RATES: 

1 -2 Ineh single column, $2.00 monthly, Net 

1 Inoh " 4 00 " " 

1 -2 Inoh double column, .-.» 4.00 " " 

1 Inoh " 7.60 " " 



— BEST PbAGES£;TO STOP AT 



WiihxnMohnvck Theatre lildy. Steam llfatifJElectricLighl 

NlleUM TMEAIIU HDltL, Schensctady, N.Y. 

Alui rl<«iu plttu ONLY. 3 block* from Vhu Cur- 
ler Optra House. $1.25 slutfle; $1.00 double, per 
day. Half block from R. U. tfBNfou. 



Hroteinoiittl'i Headquarters 

MlUEK'ij HUltL (Ameilo&n Plsxn) 
S. K. coiner Tenth and Ruce VtS., 1'biladelphla. 
A now and up-to-date hotel, borne comforts. ltutes 
$1.00 and $2.00 per day. Special Kit tee to Pro- 
fessionals. Harry C. Miller, Prop. 



Plole8MlOll.1l 1 1 Villi 1 1 Hill 1 1' I h 

THE BRIDGE HOTEL 
Bowery and Delancey Sts., N. Y. City, 2 doors 
above Miner's Theatre. Elegant furnished rooms. 
Rooms reserved by letter. Horn and Drlscoll, 
Proprietors; Win. J. Rellly, Manager. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
UHE VAJVDETWIL6 

COHVtNIEMTL Y LOO A TED 



JOS. 



J. W. 



Madden - Jess 

Invite Offers for Next Season 
Address cere of Utopians. En Route 



Miss Ollie TTartin^ of the Innocent 
Maids company lies seriously ill at St. 
Louis. She suffered n fall while in that 
rity, afterward using proscriptions sug- 
gested by members of the company. 



"Hundreds Know Me, 

Thousands Never Heard Tell of Me, 
And Millions Never Will" . . . 

HARRY FIDLER, the mimic 

as "HUGO, the Porter." in ERNEST HOGAN'S 
"RUFUS RASTUS" COMPANY 



Subscribe now 

and be sure of 

VARIETY 

EACH WEEK 



V 



HAMMEKSIfclN'S 

ICTORIA 



THEATRE 

OF 
VARIETIES 

Next Week hSBTSSEL Mar. 5 

Prices, 23c, 5<k\ 7Se k 01.00. Mat. Every Day, SOo & "iOc 

ARTHUR DUNN AND CO. 
One-act Comedy Skit. 

8— VASSAR GIRLS. 8 
Singers, Dancers and Instrumentalists. 

THE 3 CRANE BROTHERS. 
Rube Minstrels, "Special Announcement.*' 

MKI.VII.I.K AND STETSON. 
Comediennes. 



Last Time in America. 

STUART. 

The Male Patti. 

ID. 1\ REYNARD. 

W lit 1 il< ijuist. 

THE 5 JUGGLING MOW ATS. 

Sensational Club Swingers. 

MARION CARSON. 
Late of Weber's Music Hall. 

THE DANCING MITCHELLS. 
Whirlwind Dancers. 

NEW VITAGRAPH VIEWS. 



PASTOR'S 




AM THE 

ORIGINATOR OP THE IDEA 

OP USIRO A 

Phonograph 

ON THE STAGE 

Others have adopted it without credit or 
my permission, Joe Oppenhelmer in his 
"Fay Foster" Burleaaue Company and 
Lew Dockstsder. 



RICHY W. 

CRAIG 

En Route "Tfsret LUIes" Co. 

If subscribing " as per 
route 9 ' mail postal of any 
change to insure receipt. 



14th St. 



Continuous Vaudeville. 



WEEK OF MARCH 5TH, 

WARD & CURRAN. 

JAS. 1 KELLY \ND ANNIE MABEL KENT. 

CHADW1CK TRIO WILLIAMS & MELBURN 

Till. HARROWS. JOHNSON & WELLS. 

Special Feature 

5 MAGNANI FAMILY. 
VYIiA' K\ \\ WEST. PIERCE & OPP. 

MORRIS &. DALY 151 Kl INA & RROCKWAY. 
t'. o. HARSELL. THE VITAGRAPH 

MADDON & MKLVIN. Extra Attraction. 



GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 




GREATER N. Y. CIRCUIT 




VARIETY 



17 



• 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



March 5th, 

Hammerstein's 

Victoria 



The DANCING MITCHELLS 



Now playing the leading vaudeville 

theatres in America 



"HUMAN TOPS" 



May Boley Dave Marion 



u 



AND THB DASHING 

Polly Girls 

AND THB GOMICAL 

VILLAGE GUT-U 



If 



AS PRESENTED IN 

RICHARD GARLL'S 
Musical Comedy Triumph 

"The Maid and the Mummy" 

DIREGTIOPS OF M. S. BBINTHAM 



Scenes from New York East Side Life 



"Is genuinely funny." — Chicot. 
20 people in cast. Time of act, 20 minutes 

Address AL SUTHERLAND, St. James Building 



' 



J. Theodore Murphy 

"A WISE GINK" 

Principal Comedian With AL. REEVES CO. 



Have your card in Variety 




FIRST APPEARANCE IN VAUDEVILLE OF 



Lionel E. 



LATE STAGE DIRECTOR 

NEW YORK THEATRE 



PRESENTING 



The Most Original Novelty 

Ever Produced in Vaudeville 



ASSISTED BY THE 



"Rialto Girls" 

Introducing a Stage Rehearsal, showing with absolute fidelity 
the "Other Side "of bein* a "Show Girl.** Statfe Hands, Orches- 
tra, Audience, Etc. 

ALL PART OF THIS ACT 



L ANGE HOTEL 



ST. LOUIS, 

MO. 



OCEAN TO OCEAN i 

SULLIVAN & CON SI DINE 

CIRCUIT 
Largest Circuit of Family Theatres in the World 

Owning and Operating 49 First^Class Vaudeville Theatres East, North- 
west and West 

WANTED. at * U "n™* 9 ' FIRST-CLASS ACTS OF ALL KINDS that 
**** ^ mi ^ ■ *-^*—*» can deliver the goods 

SOLE BOOKING AGENTS 



AL. ONKEN, FaraiTy Theatrr, 126th St., near 

Park Ave., New York City. 
CHAS. WRAY, 219 Denny BU'r., Seattle. Wash. 



CHRIS. 0. BROWN. 67 S. Clark St.. Chica K o. 
ARCHIE LEVY. Ill Eddy St.. Sin Francisco. Cal. 



EDDIE SIMMONS 



will shortly 
appear 



w!r h Gjnam X Bailo y r«r„'a r , 



I a teat 
Tony* 



WANTED 



Experienced, reliable managers, Vau<io- 
vllio bouse*. Htate references. Must furnish 
liond. Address No. 21, care Variety. 



(Home of Variety and Burlesque People) 

1505 Market St., 

CHANGED HANDS THIS WEEK 

BETTER SER VICE AND 
RATES THAN EVER 

LOOK US OVER GUS WO RM, M£r\ 

AN ALL STAR CAST 

IS THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE 

NEW YORK INQUIRER 

IT INCLUDES 

JOHN W. KELLER 

WILLIAM C. NICHOLAS 

HAMILTON L. MARSHALL 

CHARLES ALFRED BYRNE 

"CHOLLY KNICKERBOCKER" 
R. E. RAYMOND 

CHARLES E. TREVATHAN 

LEANDER RICHARDSON 
and others 

The Publication, issued Sundays, treats of Society, Wall Street 
Politics, Racing, Sports, Automobiling, Theatres and miscellaneous 
matters and it is essentially 

"A Smart Paper for Smart Persons M 

Knickerbocker Theatre Annex, - New York 



i8 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



The FRANCO- 
AMERICAN 
COMEDIENNE 



Specially engaged for March 5, Washington, D. C; March 12, Baltimore; March 19, Philadelphia; then four weeks in New York City. 

JEANETTE DUPRE 



At liberty after April 16. 



For time and terms address (permanently) Hotel Navarre, New York. 



ROSE WENTWORTH 

WAIT FOR THE NEW ACT 

THE ORIGINATOR ' OF THE MESSENGER BOY ON THE VAUDEVILLE STAGE. 

Al. W. Maddox, Supported by Maybelle Melvin 

PRESENTING THE 

AT THE 



PRESENTING THE UNIQUE CHARACTER SKETCH, 

HT U ■=* gj qp J\ ^p I ^^ [^ •• 



READ WHAT THE REAL CRITIC OF LOWELL, MASS., SAYS. 

Maddox and Melvin's now sketch, fi %£ the Station," la to gay the least, great. Mr. Maddox is 
the original messenger boy, and will be favorably remembered by Lowell playgoers as one of the 
leading lights In several comedies which played in t his city during the past Ave years. In his 
latest vehicle he is given unusual opportunities to display his ability, and he certainly takes the 
bull by the horns, so to speak. Miss Melvin Is a charmer, and her singing adds much strength 
to the piece. As a stranded actress, full of hope, she looks and acts the part. 

YA//v\. /VIORRI8, Agent 

5IME " Caught Us " and besides praising: us highly, made a sugges- 
tion. WE HAVE TRIED TO PROFIT BY IT. 

WB NOW INVITE CHICOT TO OVERHAUL US. 

"coyviE ONE, CO/VIE /%LL." see it yourself* 
NEXT WEEK, MARCH 5, PASTOR'S (Return Date) 

A man who's wise will advertise 

And take this as a Hint 
There's not an actor on the stage 

Who dosn't liRe His name in print 



87" except 

HOWARD AND 



NORTH 



Mr. Fred Karno's cimftco. 

"A Night in an English Music Hall" 

Manager, ALP. REEVES. Agents, Wm. MORRIS and H.B. MARINELLI 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the property of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in London, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



T i* Famous Jackson Family 

In their Marvelous Bicycle Act 

Are the bif features at Hartford this week. THE TALK OF THE CITY. 

Yours truly, Goo. M. Jackson, Jackson Family. 



"SNITZ" MOORE 

Management DIVE KRAUS 
MURTIU * SEA/ION PRESENT 

ERNEST H0GAN 



(do unbleached American) 

.- "RUFUS RASTUS 



11 



Season 1 906—07 



JOE EDMONDS 

" Th " S gi j a* * Vaudeville 

H ayes and Wy"ne 

The Singing and Dancing Couple 

En Route "Funny Mr. Dooley" Co. 



HERZOG'S HORSES 



THE GREAT HORSE SHOW 

MANUEL and JOSEPHINE HERZOC 

The Mystic 

and 

His Hats 



MARSHALL 

and his German atsiiUnt, HERR PAVL. fust returned from their successful tour of Curepe. 
ADDRESS WILLIAM MORRIS 

■ ■■111 Popular 

■ ^L Mm ■■ Morning 

lib! ■ "<-<"< 

liead-rllner at Ghase's, Washington 




Week March 5. 



Harry Corson Clarke 



ACCOMPANIED BY 



Margaret Dale Owen 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TIME FILLED 



JAMES THORNTON 

Owing to extensive booking hove canceled 

European time 

'Phmnm 2490 J-Hmrtmm Addross, 1420 Fifth Avo., Now York 



ED 




Better act than I ever saw you do.— 



JAMES THORNTON 



MAJESTIC Presenting a High 
MUSICAL Class Musical 
FOUR Comedy Act 

Kntire new act next season. Feature with 
"New York Stars" Co. 

Gruel* Gruel 

BLACK FACE COMEDIANS 

En Route Williams' 4I Ideals" Co. 



COMEDY, ACIOBrTIC! I bVLLlY ACT 

Faust Trio 

V. Jerome. I.ottle Freemont. J. Rosa. 
with "New York SUrs.'* 

OPEN JUNE 3d AND LATER 

Address 939 B. 136th St.. N. Y. City 

Hi & Smith 

Artistic Delineators of Refined Singing and 

Wooden Shoe Dancing. 
Address WM. MORRIS POLI CIRCUIT 



BROCKMAN, MACK 

"THE COUNT ON MOTHER'S ACCOUNT" 



BELMONT 

Booked until June 11th. It's a good act 




VARIETY 



19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



GRACE Von STUDDIFORD 

RETURNS TO AMERICA 



For a Limited Vaudeville Engagement 

PROCTOR'S 23RD STREET, MARCH 5TH 

NEWARK ; "„ 12TH 

" 58TH STREET "■£ 19TH 

ALEXANDER STEINER, Manager 



BESSIE VALD ARE'S 

T*RO\7VE OF CyCLISTS 

Smartest Dressed and Most Refined Bicycle Act Before the Public. 
Management - /. Mm OARLE 

VAUDEVILLE'S FAVORITES 

dave GEM ARO AND BAILEY ray 

Assisted by EDDIE SIMMONS 

Will produce in the Month of May their new offering entitled: "TONY" 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, CHAS. 



IN THEIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS— CAPT. KIDD 

PER ADD., 31 CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N. Y. 

MRS. ANNIE YEAMANS 

^WT> VAVGHTEP^ JENNIE 
DECEMBER. AND MAY in 



A Few Press Opinions of Bobby RAYMOND AND CLARK, Maggie Lee 



Pittsburg Gazette, Oct. 23. 
Raymond and Clark art' something mure than the 
rapid tire conversationalist*, which they arc ad- 
vertised. They are a pair of the teal comedians 
on the variety circuit. Their Jokes are new, and 
yesterday at the Caiety they kept their hearers 
convulsed with laughter as long as they remained 
on the stage. 



Providence Journal, Sept. 19. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid Are conversationalists, 
hate an especially good turn. The man is partic- 
ularly clever and the woman sings some funny 
parodies. 



and Clark, rapid Are conversationalists, get off a 
Dumber of sprightly local gsgs which keep the 
audience In a roar from the time they are on the 
Stage until they retire. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 30. 
The Olio acts are all hits. Raymond and Clark 
in their rapid tire conversation and clever parodies 
captured the laughing honors. The act went with 
a hurrah. 



Pittsburg Chronicle, May 16. 
Raymond and Clark have one of the hest conver- 
sational turns ever given at the Academy. Their 
dialogue Is replete with local coloring. 

■ 

Baltimore Sun, May 2. 
Bob Raymond and Maggie Lee Clark have one of 
the best sketches seen at the house this season. 



Holyoke Evening Telegram. Feb. 2. 
Raymond and Clark, billed as rapid fire conver- 
sationalists, lived up to their title, and the pair 
exchanged some of the brightest and wittiest 
repartees heard In the theatre this Reason. 



Kansas City World, Nov. 87. 

Raymond and Clark, rapid fire conversationalists, 
sent some healthy shots at the local police and 
the notorious union depot. This made a nit with 

the patrons. 

Philadelphia Item, Oot. 15. 

Raymond and Clark were very pleasing In a 
singing and talking act. Their songs are catchy, 
and their witty sayings and Jokes set the audience 
Into roars of laughter who were loath to leave 
them off the stage. 



Cincinnati Commercial, Oct. 30. 
Raymond and (lark were especially good. The 
Introduction of Mr. Raymond upon the scene In a 
most eccentric fall fairly convulsed fhe audience 
with laughter. 



Nashville Banner, Nov. 7. 
'Hie specialties are for the most part below the 
■versge seen at this house, though there are two 
which show up to excellent advantage. Raymond 



Springfield (Mass.) Daily News, Jan. 80, 1906. 

The bit of the show was scored by Raymond and 
Clark In a rapid fire conversational act that kept 
the audience laughing steadily while they were on 
the stage. They have a barrel of brand new stuff, 
all of which Is bright and clever, and the few 
familiar Jokes that are put In are merely to give 
the audience a rest. 



Variety. 
Telegraphed to same from Buffalo. 
Raymond and Clark are the best In the Olio. 
Their act received much favorable comment about 
town on account of the number of original sayings 
they have. An original act Invariably sets Buffslo 
talking. CHAS. W. OOETZ. 

EN ROUTE N. Y. STARS. 



AND STILL 
THEY COME I 



RYAN AND RICHFIELD CO. 



" Moo Hoggenys Foitiei " 

Produced at Tony Pastor's 
Theatre. May 23, 1901. 



Mike HoogeiD's Dcuomer " 

Produced at Hurtig ft Sea- 
mon's Music flail, Oct. 12, 
1JIO.I. 



moq Hogoenys Recepifon " 

Produced at Shea's Theatre, 
Toronto, Can., Feb. 12. 1908. 



(All by Will M. Creasy.) Per. address P. o. Box .'Id, Sayvllle. L. L, N. Y. 



Mr. Fred Karnos' London Comedy Co. 

Present the "Mumming Birds," or 
"A Night in an English Music Hall" 

ALL RIGHTS PROTEOTEO 

HEADLINERS WHO BRING THE MONEY BACK 

* PROOF— 

Opomod at Hammorstoin's Victoria, Oot., 10O5. with 4 weeks 9 

booking. Mow booked moll* till May, 1907. B return 

dates to Hammer s to In': 

Manager, ALE. REEVES 

MAY HOWARD 

America's Queen of Burlesque, En Route With Her Own Co. | "All the World Loves a Lover" 

Permanent address, 302 \A/. 1.21st St., INe>\A/ York. 



CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



AG KMT, H. B. MARINE LLI 



John C. Rice andSally Cohen 



DIRECTION OF JAMES E. FENNESSY 



ALL ALONE 



JOSEPH 



K 



BUT NOT LONELY 



Signed for next seasen. 



THE LITTLE HEBREW GENTLEMAN. 



» i 



WATSON 

P. •.—Will sever partnership with Mr. Harry Keeler at end of season on beat of terms 



<r" v 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



MOWATTS 

SEASON I0O6 RINGLING BROS-SEASON 1907 EUROPE 





3-LEIGHT0NS-3 



DOING 



ONE NIGHT STAND IN MINSTRELSY 

Week Pebrtiarv 26, ALHAMBRA. 
JACK LEVY, 140 West 42d St., New York City 



GRACIEEMMETT 

AND COMPANY 



IN HER 



M 



LAUGHING SUCCESS 

"Mrs. Murphy's Second Husband 

PormlHiont Address 

77 Avon Street, Somerville, Mass. 



KLEIN, OTT BROS. AND 

NICHOLSON 

MYERS & KELI^R, Agents. 31 West 31st Street, N. Y. 

. S. BENTHAM 

PRESENTS 

(THE ORI01NAL TWEEDLE PUNCH OF "FLORODORA") 

JAS. A. KIERNAN & CO. 



INCLUDING 



Stella Beardsley 

AND 

Frank Mostyn Kelly 



Nellie Bly 



IN 



James Koran's Latest Musical Comedy in Vaudeville 

'The Taming of the Beast 



Address, M. 8. BENTHAM, 



St. James Building: 



ST. ONCE BROS. 

We Have Wheels Too, But We Ride Ours ! 
Direction of the HE Director, P. J. CASEY, St. James Bid*. 

The Famous and Original 

GRAND OPERA TRIO 

~"~~~ IN THE PRISON SCENE FROM "FAUST" 

Booking Aflrent. WM. MORRIS 



REIFF BROS. 

America's Best Singing and Dancing Act 



MARCH .VTir— POM CIRCUIT 



ASK WM. MORRIS 



HARRY C. 



CAL. C. 



WALTERS AND PROUTY 

Comedians, Singers and Travesty Stars 

/\T THE DEW/EY, SUNDAY, MARCM -4-th 
Week of March 12th, Hurtlg A Seamon'a. Wm. Morris or Hotel Saranac 

THS ACT THAT EVERY ONE RECOMMENDS 
"TH«NK9, ALOKZO, 1 RECEIVED THE BRUSH. »» 

The Pioneer Vaudeville Comedienne 

FRANCESCA REDDING 

in "Her Friend from Texas" 

SiX SUOOESSFUL YEARS AND STILL A HEADLINER 

A STUPENDOUS PRODUCTION NEXT SEASON 



CHAS. J. BURKHARDT 



fifi 



The 




an With the Funny Slide " 

Thanks to managers for kind offers 
Regards to all friends with "JOLLY CRASS WIDOWS" 

CHARLES B. LAWLOR 

AUTHOR AND COMPOSER, PRESENTING 

GliARbBS B. L/VWLOR and DAUGHTERS 

CHARLES MABEL ALICE 

Author "Sidewalk! of New York," "The Mick Who Threw the Brick." "The Best In the 
House is None Too Good for Reltly," "How Can Things be on the Level When 
the World Is Round?" AND OTHERS. 

Character, Comedy and Descriptive Vocal Sketch Tei. *3J3 Riverside 




E W E L L and 




I BLO 



SAXOPHONE, VIOLIN and XYLOPHONE. 
For Time and Terms address MYERS and KELLER. 

I EO P.ARRILLO 

I 

The California Mimic 

THE ONLY AMERICAN "CHINAMAN" ON THE STAGE 

CHICOT said in Variety— "A Real Chinaman" 

BOOKING THROUGH WILLIAM MORRIS 



ADAMS 



AND 



DREW 



PRESENTING 

"A BOGUS CHAUFFEUR" 

MANAGEMENT Air. SUTHERLAND, ST. JAMES BLDO. 

CharlieCASAD& DeVERNE Grace 



Novelty Musical Entertainers 



A ■' Fitst-Clats Agents 



VARIETY 



21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



i 



t 



"The 

Geo. M. Cohan 
of Vaudeville " 



HARRY 





Week Feb. 2Gt H, Extra Attractions at the Murray Hill Theatre, New YorK City 



AGENT, WILLIAM MORRIS 



Introducing the 

Triple Summersault 



DUFFIN-REDCA Y 
TROUPE 

The Only Aot Doing a Triple. Now Booking Tlmo for Next Season. Address Myers A Keller 

GlLDAY * FOX 

Hebrew Character Comedians 

Managers kindly look us over at Amerioan Theatre, this Sunday, MARCH 4. 

WILFRED CLARKE 

Assisted by MISS THEO CAREW (EL CO. 



Presenting His Sketches 



NO NOUE TROUBLE *nd WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 



ADORfSS, L-HtBf CLUB 




BIG HIT IN VAUDEVILLE 

Collins 

Late of Job Weber's All-Star Cast 

Per. Address, 186 8th St., Elmhurst, L. I. 'Phone 221 Newtown 

The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 

AND HER 



JOHNNIES 





WHEELER EARL 


ALBERT L. PELLATON 


Ihe butler 


ED. T. MORA 


FRANK GARFIELD 


HARRY L. TIGHE 


JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 

"1 


Accompanist 







W. L. LYKENS, Manager 

Staged by CO. ROGERS 

GMARLES ROBINSON 

America's Famous Character Comedian 

HHAIl Ml l> VI I 111 THfc Bid SUCCESS 

"THE GOL.ONIAL. BBLLE8 " 



/VlftNAGEMENT 



CAMPBELL «fe DREW 



HAVE YOUR CARD IN VARIETY 



By Special Arrangement WitH Frank L. Perley 

"THB PRINGE GH^RMING" 



Rillette 



Late Prima Donna Star of "The Olrl and the Bandit" Opera) 



APPEARS 



VAUDEVILLE 



In a Musical Comedietta Entitled 



"Accidents Will Happen" 




J. BERNARD DYLLYN 

WITH THE 

"EARL AND THE GIRL" CO. 

Fourth month at the New York Casino Theatre as " Bunker Bliss, the 
Westerner.*' No Sunday nights. Ask Mrs. Montford. 

DYLLYN SAYS C1ILYFNM." IS THE BEST BONG HE HAS HAD SINCE TEXAS 
HI LI. BY JEROME. 

• HE KING OF IRELAND 

JAMBS B. DONOVAN 

AND 

MISS HE/* A A-RAOLD C3L CO. 

Queer* of Vaudeville 

In their Laughing Suooeae, "TWENTY MINUTES ON BROADWAY " 
Booked Solid. ASK MORRIS. 



lue Only Headline Act «>f Its Kind In America. 



THE 



WONDERFUL 



DUTINGD. 



A Refined Act Your Mothers, Wives, %\g\vmj§ s\ki i^citii s itw ih-y- 
Slstersand Daughters v III Enjoy. NOW ON KEITH CIRCUIT. 




For sensationalism, t Do Meers in their wiro work make Die heart bent quicker, the humor 
ous brother providing the Imiuhs making some of the most hazardous tricks look quite simple 
The Toronto Daily Star, Tuesday. February L'o, 1006. 

Feb. 26th, Shea's Theatre, Buffalo, N. Y. 

REPRESENTATIVES. 



S. K. HODGDON. 



WILLIAM MORRIS. 



3 DUMONDS 

PARISIAN STREET SINGERS 

Including JOSEPH DUMOMD. Violin Vlrtuowo 
/Vlarch WM -Providence — — 



• -.- 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



"The Man 
with the 
Talking 
Machine" 

For Burlesque, Vaudeville or 



THE ORIGINAL MUSICAL COMEDIAN 




Y 





IG 



Farce Comedy 



(\T Lia*»RTY FOR NEXT 



route Tiger Lilies Co., or 335 3d Ave., N. Y. City 

SEASON 



THE 3 AMERICAN GIRLS 



Isabella 

HURD 



Maria 

THERESA 

in a refined singing act 



Sadia 

HURD 



BOBBY NORTH 

HEBREW . COMEDIAN . 

Lata Star "Girl from Kay's" SUOCESS IN VAUDEVILLE 

Material by Aaron Hoffman 

J ewell's M annikins 

A revelation in stagecraft, with a reputation encircling the earth. 

World's champion manipulators of wooden actors and actresses 



Harry La. Rose Co. 

"THE SAILOR AND THE HORSE" 

See William Morris 
Acknowledged to be the GREATEST ATTRACTION IN VAUDEVILLE 

L.E DOMINO ROUGE 

"The Girl in the Red Domino" 

Under Direction off LUESCHER & WERBA. NEW YORK THEATRE BLDC. 

Mr. a.d Mrs. GARDNER CRANE and CO. 

PRESENTING THEIR NEW PLAY, 

"A YANKEE'S LOVE FOR DIXIE." 

BOOKLD SOLID VN11L JUNE lat. 
ORPHEUM, BROOKLYN, MARCH 5TH. 

JOHN GRIEVES 



OFFERING HI8 



"Parisian Belles" Co. En route 



T-E t-EST COMPANY ON THE ROAD 



Mallory Bros., Brooks and Halliday 

Musicians. Singers arvcf Dancers 

"Mallory Bros.. Brooks and Halliday Have a musical 
act that is good."- CHICOT. 

March 5, Amphlon Theatre, Brooklyn Par. Ad. Mallory Broa.' Cottage, Jacksonville, III* 



OTTO PARIS, 1st Tenor 



HENRY PARIS, Baritone 



WM. PARIS, 2nd Tenor 



The White City Quartette 

GEO. DONALDSON, Basso 

Melvin 




KATIE 
BARRY 

AND COMPANY 

IN 

"Just a Joke" 




Hayman ®. Franklin 

In their now offering 

"A SUIT FOR DIVORCE" 



Long, loud and legitimate laugha 
BOOKED BY WILLIAM MORRIS 



Have you aaen 



OMAR SINGH 

and hla 

"HUMAN BUTTERFLY" 



\A/EST TILL /V\MY. 



W I LLI A 




COULD 



f\ JNIi 



VALESK A SURATT 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



TO 




H EAR N 



at at 



THE LAZY JUGGLER 



99 



Acknowledged by SIME to be the Funniest Juggling Act in 

America. 



158 MAY BELFORT 

A Refined and Artistic Rendeting of Stories in Song 

THAT'S AIL MR. GEO. HOMANS, Manager 

IRENE LEE 

"The Girl in Trousers" 

Eddie Leonard 



A Positive Hit in VaudevlUe with 





ros. 



The Most Marvellous (lymnastic Act in the World Accomplishing Seemingly Impossible Feats 



»^/l "DUE AM Iff T>IJTIELA.SfT>" 

Attifed by <be SHARP BROTHEkS. Addirtt JACK O VY, MO "Weit 476 St., N Y. 

THE ORIGINAL. 

Three _ Madcaps 



INIINA 



AMY 



PAINSY 



BOOKED SOLID 



Address AL. HAVER, St. James Building 



VARIETY 



23 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




IN " 



GLORIA 



II 



By ALF HAMPTON 

Now in Vaudeville 

■ 

An Elaborate Scenic Playlet of Western Life 





T 



Address William Morris 

EMMA FRANCIS 

B? Arabian Whirlwinds 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION OF M. S. BENTHAM 

DORSCH & RUSSELL 

THE MUSICAL RAILROADERS 

Address 408 Morris Ave., Newark, N. J. 
or Al. Sutherland 

Still at the Switch out «»!•«> 



RICE & PREVOST 

IN 

BUMPTY BUMPS 



Arthur J. 



Miss Grace 



McWATTERS and TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDEVILLE" 



ALICE 



PHILBROOKS 

and SIDNEY 

REYNOLDS 

Present 

"MISS STENO, STENOGRAPHER" 

A (ierman Comedy Sketch 

ROLAND WEST 



F. Daly Burgess 

GOMEDIAIN 

And Hie Dos. - FINNEGAN 

In Vaudeville 

GARTELLE 
BROS. 

Ska to rial ism 

THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

FJOE MM«f MftWK 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week March 5, Imperial, Brooklyn. 



THE TWO 



• •«*»»j« 



JOCKEY JONES 

Management My era A Keller, 31 W. 31 at St. 

KITTIE STEVENS 

7 character dances and changes In 10 minutes. 
WEEK FEB. 1Q, KEITH'S, BOSTON 



IRENE LA TOUR 

AND HER ZJ\Z,f\ 



CLEVER DOG 
30Q West 24th Street 



NEW YORK 



Shrodes 

WORKING 

BILLIE RITCHIE 

"The Drunk" 

A Night in an English Music Hall 

The PELOTS 

Odd and Humorous 

JUGGLERS 

ORPHrJl'M. SALT LAKE CITY, I TAIL 

EXPOSITION FOUR 



(3 ALEXANDERS and BRADY) 

TH 

BEST 

IN 




, III 





LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 

JACK NORWORTH 

PresenUTHDCOLtEGb BOY 



Bush Gordon 

"HURLY BURLY COMIQUES" 

Season 1905-6. the vaudeville at ractlon 
"Jolly Grass Widows." At liberty May 3d 

Gardner Ifincent 

"WINNING A QUEEN" 

Booked Solid for 3 Years 

NANON JACQUES 

Singing Comedienne 

WILLIAM MORRIS. Agent 



CIIAS. E. 



LILLY E. 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloquist and 

The Dancing Doll 

in Europe for Ose year. 
Playing Return Dates Everywhere 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. C, 
London. Rnglnnd. 

THE MAO WIJH THE GOODS 

HARRY THOMSON 

His Honor the Mayor of the Bowery 

A Simr Fmmlurm In VmudmviHm 

LINDSAY'S 

Dogs and Monkeys 



JOHN 



CAKKIE 



WARD & WARD 

IN VAUDEVILLE IN THE 

"FOOLISH MR. WISE" &K& 

BURROWS-TRAVIS CO. 

in their up-to-the-minute Comedy Act, 

"ROOM 13" 



SOMERS& LAW 

Presenting their Gt-nuan Conversational tangle, 

"MR. AUTO FROM MOBILE" 

14 Mhi "In One" 



THE FAMOUS 

Colby Family 

Orpheum Circuit until June. Oot. 1, '06, until 
April, 1 007, hooked oolld. Saa Morrla, 6 W. 
28th St., N. Y. City, or Wm. H. Colby, par route 

THE PLAYER 

Walter Daniels 

Impersonating the Celebrities. Make-up and 

changing all characters In full view off 

audienoa. Address 

SAM POSNER, St. J*mea Bid*. 




Joe, Myra, Buster and Jingles 

KEATON 

Eccentric Comedians 

Address THE MAN WITH THE TABLE. WIFE 
AND TWO KIDS. 220 West 38th Street. N. Y.. 
care of Ehrich House. 

Peschkoff Troupe 

Russian National Dancers 

PITROT & (IIRARD, Exclusive Agents 
1265 Broadway, New York 

JACK MASON 

Producer and Gen'l Stage Director 

Mgr. Five Society Belles 

Addreas tare ot STAIR 6c HAM IN 

BROADWAY THEATRE BlILDINO 

'THE NARROW FELLER." 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

"THE MAH FROM GEORGIA" 



CHERIDAH SIMPSON 



in Vaudeville 

a* 



"THE WIDOW" 
With "The Prince of Pilaen Girls" 



ED. MARKIJM 



Press Rep. 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 



24 



VARIETY 







And his 




Famous 
Mechanical 

Figures 



Go with Mr. Martin Beck's Great Orpheum Show again 



NEXT SEASON 



■ *r>- 






Presenting the biggest and best of all Ventriloquial offerings 



$1,000 



Being expended for new scenery, figures 

and effects 



$ 1 ,000 






Now playing a season of 43 weeks 



Nothing west of Detroit 



? 



He's at Hammerstein's again next week 



Morris Did It 



Morris Did It 






Morris Did It 



GRAND OPENING OF THE HUSTLING HOUSE 





Pub. Co 




Note the Address, 



Day and Date 



53 W. 28th St. Monday, March 5 

.7 good line of songs to select from, ftLL ED ROGERS' own compositions, which is a guarantee for good material. 

R/\ST RECORD RROY/ES THIS 

Two piano players in attendance and ED ROGERS to welcome his old friends as well as the new ones. Don't forget to give us a call. 






TWENTY-FOUR PAGES. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 






" 







L 



FIRST YEAR, NO. 13. 



MARCH io, 1906. 




PRICE, FIVE CENTS 

T 






CHICOT 



Lh £$**/* st'"**- "■ K 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 1905, at the post oMce at New York, N. Y., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 18791 



J'. 



VARIETY 



: 






EARL'S COURT TO GO. 

(Cable to Variety.) 

London, March 9. 

It has just become known here that the 
famous Earl's Court, one of London's 
standard amusement resorts, will be no 
more after this year. Centrally located as 
it is, the land has grown so valuable that 
the inducements held out have settled its 
fate. 

Imre Kiralfy's new park, now in course 
of construction at Sheppard's Bush in the 
suburbs, will virtually replace the Court 
as London's summer amusement resort, 
ninety-six acres of ground having been 
procured. 

Earl's Court will be greatly missed. It 
attained worldwide renown about seven 
years ago when the Ferris wheel got 
"stuck," holding the occupants in the cars 
over night. The management gave each 
person $25 the next morning. Many farces 
have been based on the incident. 



BECK COMING HOME. 

(Cable to Variety.) 

Liverpool, March 7. — Martin Beck, the 
general manager of the Orpheum Circuit 
in the United States, sailed to-day unex- 
pectedly for home on the Majestic. 

Mr. Beck declined to give any reason 
for his sudden change in plans, he not hav- 
ing intended to leave until toward the end 
of the month. 



HOMANS' HERALD SQUARE. 

With the whirl of the theatrical ma- 
chinery George Homans arrives as $ 
Broadway vaudeville manager with a house 
of his own. 

The Herald Square Theatre will be va- 
cated on April 30, and immediately after- 
ward will be taken possession of by Mr. 
Homans. 

The rent is said to be $60,000 yearly, 
and Homans is reported to have said he 
expected to lose $25,000 the first twelve 
months. 

What financial backing, if any, Mr. 
Homans has yet for his venture is not 
known. It is generally supposed that he 
secured the lease depending upon the or- 
ganization of a stock company to furnish 
the necessary capital to continue it. 



BIGELOW— PERHAPS. 

There has been a rush of vaudeville 
agents after Charles A. Bigelow since 
he decamped from the Joe Weber com- 
pany. 

One agent says he will come in vaude- 
ville with a big act and nine girls. An- 
other agent states that such a rumor he 
has heard. Somebody else breathes about 
the Shubert brothers taking possession of 
the comedian, while still another remarks 
that Bigelow would never have quit 
Weber's had he not something "up his 
sleeve" at the time. Mr. Bigelow says 
nix. * 



\ 



NO MORE FOR POWERS. 

James T. Powers does not expect to 
linger longer in the varieties than this 
season, as per the present outlook. 

Mr. Powers is in receipt of several of- 
fers for next fall in musical productions, 
and says he only accepted engagements in 
vaudeville for this round of the circuits 
in order that he should not be too long 
separated from his family at any one 
time, which up to the present hasn't oc- 
curred. 



WILLIAM MORRIS IN CHICAGO. 

Western headquarters of William Mor- 
ris will be located in Chicago, Mr. Morris 
himself leaving for Windy town shortly 
after getting settled in the new quarters 
in the Holland Building here, to make the 
proper arrangements. 

It has not been announced as yet who 
will be in charge of the Chicago branch, 
but it is known that the office there will 
be complete in detail. The special at- 
tention Mr. Morris has decided to devote 
henceforth to summer parks and fairs, 
together with his Western connections, 
rapidly increasing, rendered this step 
necessary. 

It will also give an Eastern inlet to 
many Western acts at present fearful of 
coming on tnrough want of confidence in 
success being the reward. 



J. AUSTIN FYNES INTERESTED. 

Among the ventures in which J. Austin 
Fynes, formerly general manager for F. 
F. Proctor, is interested is a corporation 
entitled "The Nickolat Co." The intent of 
the scheme is to give shows in stores, 
which will be rented for that purpose, at 
an admission of five cents. The entertain- 
ment offered will be series of moving 
pictures, together with illustrated songs. 

One store is reported to have been rent- 
ed at 125th street and Fifth avenue in 
this city, and will shortly open. There is 
a lawsuit now pending over another one in 
the same locality. Mr. Fynes is believed 
to own the majority of stock in the enter- 
prise. 

The principle involving such a low price 
of admission is that the pictures, machines 
and films may be secured very cheaply, 
while the illustrated songs, including the 
singers, will be furnished free by the song 
publishers, leaving the rent and the col- 
ored men who will call out "show's over" 
every half hour as the only heavy expense 
items. 



FISCHER FOR HIMSELF. 

Clifford C. Fischer, formerly American 
representative for H. B. Marinelli, has re- 
signed that position. Mr. Fischer has 
taken a suite of offices in the Holland 
Building, 1440 Broadway. 

The style under which the agency busi- 
ness will hereafter be conducted by Mr. 
Fischer will be as "The Agents' Agency," 
he representing all foreign agents, booking 
acts through the agents only and for the 
agents, acting as intermediary between the 
foreign agents and American managers 
without direct connection with the artists 
themselves. 



ERCOLE'S ANNUAL. 

C. M. Ercole, the Paris vaudeville agent, 
will be here shortly to superintend the 
new foreign acts to go out with the Bar- 
num Si Bailey show this season. 

Mr. Ercole makes a trip each season for 
this purpose, surveying the acts when they 
first appear with the circus at the Madison 
Square Garden. 



STEINER AND WESLEY. 

Louis Wesley and Alexander Steiner 
will form a partnership in the agency 
business, commencing operations as a firm 
on April 1, in the present offices of Mr. 
Sf ciner in the St. James Building. More 
spare will be taken to meet the added re- 
quirements. Both the members are well 
known in the theatrical world. 



WEBER & RUSH AFTER VAUDEVILLE. 

With Schenectady and Binghamton on 
their list as vaudeville towns, Weber & 
Rush are still reaching out for more. Sev- 
eral cities have been looked over, and the 
firm expects to be an important factor 
next season in this division of the varie- 
ties. 

One advantage possessed by Weber & 
Rush in their strictly vaudeville ventures 
is that if failure results from a straight 
policy, the house may be turned over to 
burlesque, the firm having shows of that 
nature of their own, other than being 
largely identified with the Columbia 
Amusement Co. (Eastern Wheel). 



KEITH GOING WEST. 

That Keith is going after the opposi- 
tion is evident from the latest attempt to 
enter Toledo. . H. H. Lamkin operates the 
Arcade Theatre there in the Ohio town at 
present for vaudeville, and the only avail- 
able house for Keith is the Valentine, 
managed by Lee M. Boda, who has the- 
atres in Indianapolis and Columbus. 

Mr. Boda's theatres are booked through 
the Klaw & Erlanger offices, and it was 
necessary to secure the consent of the 
"Syndicate, Sr.," before final arrangements 
could be made. 

This, it is understood, has been received, 
and Keith will add Toledo to his list, 
while Columbus may follow. 

It is reported that the Keith influence is 
seeking an opening through the combina- 
tion houses booked by Klaw & Erlanger 
by which the unexpected addition of the 
Sullivan-Considine circuit to the Morris 
family group and its effect may be coun- 
teracted. 



AMPHION NOT YET SOLD. 

The report freely circulated that 
Charles E. Blaney had purchased the Am- 
phion Theatre in Brooklyn is not entirely 
correct. 

The Amphion is under lease to William 
T. Grover for four years from May 1 
next. He may be induced to sell at his 
figure. 

Further than that none of the state- 
ments has been accurate. A meeting of 
the stockholders of the Amphion Academy 
Company, the owners of the theatre, will 
be held on March 15th, when a decision 
will be arrived at. 



FYNES TO HAVE A HOUSE. 

J. Austin Fynes has secured control of 
the land at the northwest corner of 125th 
street and Fifth avenue, where now stands 
a Jewish temple. 

Report also says that Mr. Fynes will 
erect a theatre on the spot, but for what 
purposes is not known. 



ROOF GARDEN CHANGES. 

William A. Brady will have the" New 
York Theatre Roof Garden this summer, 
while at the resort atop the New Amster- 
dam roof George M. Cohan will revive 
"Running for Office" and "The Governor's 
Son," his earlier dramatic successes. 



LOUIS ROBIE ILL. 

Louis Robie, a prominent figure in the 
burlesque world, was attacked with cir- 
rhosis of the liver at Kansas City last 
week. His illness was considered so seri- 
ous that Mr. Robie's family was wired to 
come on immediately. 



WILMER & VINCENT'S THREE MORE. 

Reading, Pa., March 9. — Current report 
has it that Wilmer & Vincent, who now 
control vaudeville theatres in tliia city, 
Utica and Allentown, will have houses in 
Harrisburg, Pa., Wheeling, W. Va., and 
Montreal, Canada, at the opening of next 
season. 

If the house in Wheeling proves an 
established fact and the Keith people have 
located there, it will "be tt decided opposi- 
tion town. There is little doubt, though, 
of Harrisburg and Montreal. 



KEITH IN LANCASTER. 

Lancaster, Pa., March 9. — Following the 
visit of S. K. Hodgdon and A. Paul Keith 
to this city some two weeks ago, it has 
developed that the Family Theatre here 
has passed over to the Keith control. 

Edward Mozart is the present manager, 
but no information is obtainable whether 
the entire Mozart circuit is to follow the 
Family into the Keith fold. 



SHUBERTS WANT DRESSER AND 
N0RW0RTH. 

Louise Dresser and Jack Norwoith have 
received offers from the Shubert Brothers 
to appear in one of their musical pieces. 
Miss Dresser to join the next new play at 
the Casino and Norworth to be afterward 
placed. 

Both are seriously deliberating. 



LILLIAN RUSSELL COMING BACK. 

If vaudeville time can be secured, Lillian 
Russell will return from her pleasure trip 
abroad to fill it. The Williams houses are 
heing sought by William L. Lykens for 
the erstwhile prima donna. 

Whether successful or not, Lillian will 
soon be with us. 



SEMON WITH WEBER'S? 

There has been some talk during the 
week that Joe Weber looked Cnarles F. 
Semon over while the latter played Tony 
Pastor's last week and made Semon an 
offer to join his show. 



CLEVELAND HOUSE FOR LEASE. 

The Lyric Theatre in Cleveland, which 
has attempted vaudeville in a cheaper 
form under the present management, will 
be on the market after the expiration of 
the present lease. 



ANOTHER TYSON. 

Lena Tyson, the younger sister of Grace 
Tyson, of MeWaters and Tyson, will 
make the vaudeville plunge at the con- 
clusion of her season with "The Boy Be- 
hind the Gun." 



CASEY WITH MORRIS. 

P. J. Casey, of the St. James Building. 
and very popular among vaudevillians. 
will be connected with the William Mor- 
ris office after April 1. 



WILLIAMS OUT AT MANHATTAN. 

Percy Williams will not have the man 
agement of the Manhattan Beach Theft* 
tre this summer. Last season was quite 
sufficient. 



FISCHER'S SUCCESSOR. 

The successor to Clifford G. Fischer as 
the American representative of H. B. Mari- 
nelli will 1m> Leo Maase, from the Paris 
office, who is expected to arrive tomorrow. 



VARIETY 



Hr/ety 

A Variety Paper far Variety People. 

Published eyery Saturday by 

THE VARIBTY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Tbeatre Building, 
1402 Broadway, New York City. 



BIME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 
22, 1805, at the post office at New York, N. Y.. 
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

a 1 1 1) U a 1 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••■•••••••••• • ^* 

r OrtM£D ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• v 

Six and tbree months in proportion. *~~ 
Single coplea five centa. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent addreaa 
or as per route, as desired. 

Copyright 1900 by Variety Publishing Co. 



ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION. 



First Year. 






No. 13. 



VARIETY announces "fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair 1 ' are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. That's 
VARIETY. 

Both E. F. Albee and B. F. Keith are 
now in the West near Chicago. 



The Morris & Rowes two-ring circus 
opens its season at Santa Cruz, Cal., to- 
day. 



Fred Walton will put out another act 
independent of the one he is now appear- 
ing in. 



Jack Wilson will next be seen in a new 
sketch which will open in Wilmington 
April 3. 



Fred Thompson of the Hippodrome had 
an unsatisfactory trip to Europe after 
novelties. 



Josie Sadler will soon come into vaude- 
ville, leaving the show she is now with 
for that purpose. 



Eldora, the juggler, is doubling in the 
burlesque company he is now with, giving 
both turns in the olio. 



Ford and Wilson, the blackface team, 
have decided to discontinue their partner- 
ship after March 20. 



The Dodladas, a foreign animal act with 
sheep as the chief attraction, arrived the 
past week to join the Barnum-Bailey cir- 



cus. 



James II. Jee, the English leaper on the 
tight wire, has fully recovered from his 



Miss Mitchell, of the Dancing Mitchells,, 
played Hammerstein's this week after 
having just recovered from an illness. 



John J. Iris has released himself from- 
the Sullivan-Considine Circuit, joining- 
the staff of the Doric Theatre at Yonkers. 



recent injury and will resume his engage- 
ments. 



John Robinson, head of the John Robin- 
son shows, is critically ill at his home in 
Terrace Park, the winter quarters of the 
circus. 



All of the musicians in the Hippodrome 
orchestra are sporting scarf pins with 
lions on them presented by Mile. Claire 
Ileliot. 



Excavation for the new Columbia 
Amusement Company (Western Wheel) 
burlesque theatre in Memphis, Tenn., has 
commenced. 



"Breaking Into Society," the play the 
Four Mortons are appearing in this season, 
is said to be the best paying "dollar" 
show on the road. 



Catherine Kelly McCord, formerly of 
"A Chinese Honeymoon" and other 
light operas, tried out her new sketch for 
vaudeville recently. 



Audrey Kingsbury will have the first 
showing of her new offering, 'The Garden 
of Melody," at Keeney's Theatre in 
Brooklyn, March 19. 



The Orpheum road show next season 
will open September 17, Ed F. Reynard, 
the ventriloquist, who will go with it, hav- 
ing been so informed. 



John L. Sullivan is writing managers to 
give him another chance. John L. is not 
particular; he will appear either in a 



monologue or a sketch. 



There has been a plainly noticeable im- 
provement in the dressing of the colored 
women in vaudeville lately. More subdued 
colors now are the vogue. 



Eph Thompson's elephants open at the 
International Theatre at Chicago on March 
18 for an extended engagement, afterward 
filling time in summer parks. 






According to the English "Music Hall" 
all the money necessary to endow a "Dan 
Leno" cot in the Belgrave Hospital for 
Children has now been raised. 



At a benefit recently where J. Bernard 
Dyllyn followed George M. Cohan, Mr. 
Dyllyn remarked as he came on the stage, 
"I follow the whole show world." 



W. S. Butterfleld will open the Bijou 
Theatre in Flint, Mich., on March 20, 
making four vaudeville theatres in all con- 
trolled by Mr. Butterfleld in thtit State. 



Mme. Colvegrove and her trained horse 
Avill appear for the first time in the East 
next week at the Gotham in Brooklyn. 
The act has played the West extensively. 



i 




\ 



• 



:■■■ 



Caicedo has cancelled all his vaudeville 
dates to go to Chicago with the company 
playing at the Auditorium under the man- 
agement of Messrs. Thompson and Dundy. 



There may be a change in the manage- 
ment of Keeney's Theatre, in Brooklyn, 
for next season, the present manager for 
Mr. Keeney, Theodore Wenzlik, probably 
retiring. 



Seymour, of Seymour and Hill, injured 
his kneecap in Portland, Me., while play- 
ing there last week, the team having to 
lose two weeks thereby. The three La 
Maze brothers fill in their time. 



John Hedge, the colored boy, is still 
with Leon Morris' ponies. Donat Bediui, 
the clown, who is also one of Mr. Morris' 
assistants, was brought back from the 
other side. 



Sim Collins, of Collins and Hart, who has 
been confined to a London hospital through 
a fracture received abroad, will, it is 
expected from the latest advices, return 
here by April 1. 



A new dramatic paper called the En- 
core is being published for the Northwest 
at Seattle. It has honored Variety by 
using the opening announcements of this 
paper, besides adopting our policy. 

-' The Remerka Family, a foreign animal 
act with five horses and a dog, have been 
brought over here by Pitrot and Girard 
to join the Sells- Forepaugh show. Two of 
the horses are said to be the smallest ever. 



A report during the week ha'd it that 
Fred Walton was offered two weeks in 
each of the Proctor houses after his open- 
ing at Proctor's Albany theatre last 
Monday afternoon. 



The Kremo Family, consisting of ten 
German acrobats, has been booked for the 
Hippodrome in 1908 at a salary of $1,000 
weekly. Neither the family nor price bear 
any relation to the cigars of the same 
name. 



Pierce and Opp did not like their posi- 
tion on the Pastor bill this week. That 
is the reason they are not appearing there. 
F. O. Harrell, another entry not appearing, 
neglected to "show up." 



Burt G. Clark and company have can- 
celed their vaudeville time, Mr. Clark hav- 
ing taken up again, at short notice, the 
part of the Colonel (which was originated 
by him) in "In Old Kentucky." 



Col. John D. Hopkins* vaudeville the- 
atres at Memphis and Louisville have or- 
chestras of six and seven pieces, respec- 
tively. The Colonel plays bills up to 
(2,500 weekly at the.»e houses, and then 
wonders why. 

Doty, of Steely, Doty and Coe, has writ- 
ten the musical numbers for the next 
opera to appear at the Casino. Mr. Doty 
has also contracted to produce musical 
compositions for other prominent legiti- 
mate managers. 






4 



VARIETY 






Why the Vaudeville Artists 

of America Should Organize 



BY EPES W. SARGENT. 



Perhaps nothing has contributed so 
greatly to the need of an organization of 
artists as the booking systems at pres- 
ent in force. The methods now employed 
are manifestly unfair to the artists, and 
in the general trend toward concentration 
the artist sees his greatest menace. 

Not one of the present systems is de- 
serving of credit in any particular, and 
especially to be condemned is the practice 
of managers combining to book acts 
through a central ollice for the purpose 
of deducting five per cent, from the ar- 
tist's salary. 

The original scheme of a clearing house 
for engagements would have worked alike 
to the benefit of the artist and manager, 
but the managers had long and covetous 
eyes upon the agent's commission, and be- 
fore the scheme was fairly launched it was 
decided that through combination this 
commission could be returned to the man- 
ager's pocket less the pro rata assess- 
ment for conducting the business. 

As long as a performer has to pay it 
makes little difference to him who gets 
this share of the money for which he has 
labored. Originally it was supposed to be 
a fee paid the agent in consideration of 
his efforts for the benefit of the performer, 
and the artist who procured an engage- 
ment through the active services of an 
agent did not object to the payment. 

Most of the artists of the present day 
would be glad to pay more than the cus- 
tomary five per cent, could they have as- 
surance that they were getting what they 
were paying for in the matter of active 
representation. 

It is not in the commission but in the 
offensive aspect that the artist has to 
fear the booking systems of the present. 
There was a time when an artist unfortu- 
nate enough to offend a manager in the 
West could come East until the trouble 
blew over. Now a sort of ledger account 
is kept, and an artist who offends any of 
the powers that be gives offence to at 
least half of the managerial body ; n con- 
sequence. 

Again, when the engagements come 
through one office with a single directing 
head it is an easy matter to practice the 
most dangerous tactics of the booking as- 
sociations. An artist whose ideas of sal- 
ary do not coincide with those of the as- 
sociated managers is left out of all con- 
sideration until the salary is brought 
down to what the managers consider a 
proper figure. 

With three main booking organizations 
there is always a chance to play one 
against the other two, and so gain at least 
sufficient time to permit the artist to be 
independent but there is no telling when 
one of the two Eastern affairs will absorb 
the other and then the artist will be ab- 
solutely at the mercy of the dictator. 

With an organization sufficiently strong 
to exact justice for the artist It would 
not matter how strong any body of man- 
agers might grow since the artists proper- 
ly organized can meet any demonstration 
on the part of the managers. 

It would not be necessary to call a 



strike or indulge in general hostilities; it 
could simply be required that managers 
should guarantee fairness and the strength 
of the body would enforce the fulfilment 
of the promise. 

Another feature of the present situa- 
tion is the impossibility of obtaining a 
hearing for a new act. Managers are mak- 
ing constant cry for novelities, but instead 
of offering encouragement to those who 
seek, to supply the demand it is almost 
impossible to gain a hearing for new 
business. 

Some booking offices send out incom- 
petent observers to make report on new 
turns, and on hundreds of occasions in 
the past five years a good act has been 
kept from profiting because not a single 
booking representative has seen the turn. 

New acts were able to get on at Sun- 
day concerts until recently, but even then 
it was seldom that the agents had a rep- 
resentative to watch the performance. No 
effort is made to encourage the artist who 
seeks to be original, and the manager in- 
stead turns to the dramatic stage for some 
well known name for which tho real va- 
riety artist has to make good. 

If the artists should organize and main- 
tain a trial theatre where on stated oc- 
casions new acts could be tried out before 
the managers' representatives and such 
of their fellow artists as might care to 
drop in, the morning trials could be done 
away with and instead of playing for half 
a dozen men the new act could be shown 
before an audience. 

The trouble with the booking system 
as at present constituted appears to 
be that each agent carries in his mind a 
certain number of acts. Of perhaps fif- 
teen to eighteen hundred names fifty may 
be personal friends, and these are first 
looked after. There are two or three hun- 
dred who are known, and the rest are used 
to fill in when the market is dull. 

The remaining acts are absolutely ig- 
nored, and so busy is the booking man 
with his friends that there is no time to 
get acquainted with the others. 

This is as bad for the manager as it 
is for the artist, for in the small towns 
particularly the audiences demand a con- 
stant change, and yet the manager is com 
pelled to repeat the same acts season after 
season until his patrons tire of the repe- 
tition and turn to other forms of amuse- 
ment. 

If the performers were organized, had a 
registry bureau where at all times the 
immediate address might be kept on rec- 
ord, and if with the organization at his 
back the performer could command the re- 
spect of the agent instead of assuming the 
position of suppliant toward the man who 
is actually in his employ, there would be 
a new condition of affairs and the long 
waits for such crumbs of comfort as may 
be found in the assurance that the agent 
will take the matter up next week would 
be avoided. The artist would be a man, 
not a beggar. 

It sometimes happens that an act will 
play in town for a week without a single 
responsible person having seen the turn. 



If it does succeed in gaining an audience 
there are various forms of graft that must 
be encountered and then when the graft 
has been paid it frequently happens that 
the promises are not kept. Fourteen 
months ago a certain act paid fifty dollars 
for a trial show. The man with whom 
they dealt set his own price and pocketed 
the money. The trial has not yet been 
arranged for. 

This and other evils could be done away 
with if the artist dealt with the agent not 
as an individual but as a unit of an or- 
ganization. The time is coming when the 
artist will either be organized or beaten 
without a fight. It remains for the artist 
to decide which condition it shall be. 






VAUDEVILLE, 1906-1907. 






CURTIN'S BALL. ' 

The annual ball of the James H. Curtin 
Association will be held in Tammany Hall 
on Sunday evening. Curtin, who is the 
manager of the London Theatre, has a 
host of friends who will turn out for the 
event. 



RUTH EVERETT'S IDEA OF HERSELF. 

From a free hand pen and ink sketch 
drawn by Ruth Everett, a member of the 







11 




Jolly Grass Widows burlesque company. 
Originally drawn by Miss Everett with- 
out knowledge that it would be published. 



"COL." BORDEVERRY "ON HIS WAY." 

"Colonel" Gaston Bordeverry, the first 
sharpshooter who ever hit a white bull's- 
eye with a "phony" bullet at the Hippo- 
drome, is on his way from Europe, and will 
again appear at the same place in a new 
thought which struck him when the ship 
going over attained an elevation of forty- 
five degrees. 

The sensational part of the new offer- 
ing will be the "Colonel" shooting a hole 
in the water in the Hippodrome tank with 
his left hand, and keeping the hole open 
thereafter by alternating with both hands, 
using only solid shot made by himself. 



GRACE VON STUDDIFORD ANGRY. 

Last Monday was the contracted date 
for Grace Von Studdiford to open at Proc- 
tor's Twenty-third Street Theatre. 

Like other artists, her time was sub- 
ject to change without notice, even though 
the contract did not so specify, and Miss 
Von Studdiford is expected to open at 
Newark on Monday next instead. 

The opera singer was very wrathful over 
the delay, but calmed down after having 
it explained that a little thing like that 
is quite an ordinary occurrence in vaude. 
ville over here. 



The present indications are that no town 
or city of importance at the opening of 
the season 1906-1907 will be left uncov- 
ered by the vaudeville magnates, the 
activity in this division of theatricals 
being marked at present. 

All the larger circuits and managers are 
scouring the country in an endeavor to 
secure available sites which will increase 
their range and power. The United States 
will be thoroughly vaudevillized very soon. 

There is at present no possible gauge to 
the number of houses which will be oper- 
ated. It is not so much the expected sub- 
stantial financial returns as the struggle 
for supremacy and to be the first on the 
ground which causes the strenuous en- 
deavor to secure houses. 

The only drawback to the general 
scheme is that so few cities outside of 
New York can afford to play the higher 
priced acts. This limits the time in that 
regard, but the outlook means plenty of 
engagements for the medium and smaller 
priced ones. 



JAMES THORNTON ILL. 

Last week James Thornton was called 
to Albany to replace Richard Golden in 
the Proctor bill there. Afterward it was 
decided to allow Mr. Golden to continue 
during the week. Mr. Thornton was taken 
ill while waiting for the train to return, 
and Ford West, who was with Thornton 
at a time, sent for a physician, 
telegraphing for Bonnie Thornton, Jim's 
wife, to come at once. 

Mr. Thornton's condition at one time 
was extremely critical, but he is recover- 
ing, although it will be a month before 
he is able to be out. Mr. Thornton struck 
his head against a doorway and erysipelas 
developed. The rumor that he was intoxi- 
cated is without foundation. 



ARTILLERY GIRLS CLOSED. 

Last Monday afternoon at the Amphion 
Theatre in Brooklyn May Dixie's Artil- 
lery Girls, after a road tour of a week, 
was closed by the Grover management. 

Miss Dixie came from the West, and 
made quite an investment in the act, but 
was unfortunate in the selection of a drill 
master. 

William S. Grover states that he will 
reorganize the girls under another name 
and attempt it once again. 



BAYONNE'S NEW HOUSE. 

Bayonne, N. J., is near enough to the 
only town to be seen with the naked 
eye from the top of the Statue of Liberty 
on a cloudy day. 

In order that Bayonne, N. J., may keep 
pace with the metropolis a new vaude- 
ville theatre will be built there under the 
direction of the Bayonne Amusement Com- 
pany, of which E. S. Schiller is the su- 
preme head. Myers & Keller will book 
exclusively for the new venture. 



A COUNTESS AS A TRAINER. 

Pitrot & Girard are importing to this 
country for exhibition purposes the Coun- 
tess Margot von Stuttenheim, of German 
descent, and a horse trainer of the "high 
school" sort. 

The foreign lady will probably play one 
of the circuses for the summer. Her title 
is her own, having reached her by heredity. 
The titled woman is single, and prefers the 
title and her animals to marriage. 






VARIETY 






KEITH IN CLEVELAND— WITNESS. 

Cleveland, March 9.— B. F. Keith ar- 
rived here Saturday, rumor has it, for the 
purpose of selecting a site for a new 
theatre. He has been unavoidably de- 
tained, however, by being subpenaed to 
appear at a lawsuit being brought against 
his house here by some colored man, who 
insists that discrimination was used when 
the usher politely told him that a mis- 
take had been made at the box oflice and 
changed his coupons to others alongside 
of colored people. Following the advice 
of a paper published in the interest of the 
colored race, he had his seat coupons 
photographed and presents these with a 
sworn statement of the transaction as 
evidence and demands $300 damages. 



SOMETHING DOING. 

Plans are under way whereby the Co- 
lumbia Amusement Company (Eastern 
Wheel of burlesque) will be greatly en- 
larged for next season. One of the promi- 
nent members said yesterday that while 
anything divulged at present would be 
very inimical to the prospects, it might 
be stated that the circuit will be ex- 
tended in an altogether unlooked for way, 
and that there would be thirty-eight shows 
on the road next season as against thirty 
now traveling. 

The season so far, although opening 
poorly, is satisfactory to the Eastern folk, 
md is expected to wind up in a blaze of 
financial glory. 



MARINELLI TO KEITH DIRECT. 

When Leo Nino, the foreign musical 
eeeentrique, lpft for Paris last week after 

canceling all time over the Keith circuit, 
which he had been induced to sign in the 
absence of the representative of Marinelli, 
who booked him originally, Mr. Nino car- 
ried a letter on the Keith letter-head writ- 
ten in any but flattering terms about 
Marinelli himself. 

Nino said before leaving that no one 
excepting Mr. Marinelli could have posses- 
sion of the epistle. He further ventured 
the assertion that the foreign agent would 
spend 50,000 francs before he considered 
the Keith letter properly answered. 



STRIKE STILL ON IN DETROIT. 

St. Louis, March 9. — John Suarez, Lee 
Hart, John Barry and James Furlong, 
composing the executive board of the 
Theatrical Brotherhood, have decided to 
continue calling out the working staff of 
?»how3 playing Detroit, Mich. They arc 
in Detroit now. President Suarez states 
that when the national convention is held 
in Boston next July further means of 
fighting the Detroit managers, who pre- 
fer an "open" house, will be devised. 



MARGARET WYCHERLY IN SOON. 

A sketch probably will shortly intro- 
duce Margaret Wycherly to vaudeville. 
Miss Wvcherlv's last legitimate engage- 
ment was as the leading lady in "Cashel 
Byron's Profession," and she is the wife 
of Bnyard Villier, the present "Robert 
Speare" on the Morning Telegraph. 



Some canceling of dates by Win. T. 
Graver has given rise to many questions. 
Mr. Grovcr's representative states that 
nothing out of the ordinary was canceled. 
All acts booked after May 13, the date his 
theatres close, and a few others not cared 
for were the unlucky ones. 



HERE COMES A PRINCESS. 

Just past the Gerry Society limit, the 
Princess__de Carengeot, a Franco -Russian 
tithe of the nobility, will arrive in New 
York in due time to make her first Ameri- 
can appearance at Hammerstein's Roof 
this summer. 

She will be accompanied by a young 
man, who will assist her in whirlwind 
dances. The Princess has had a romantic 
experience, and from her pictures will 
cause many hearts to beat quickly for the 
nonce. 

It is so seldom that a blonde arrives 
from Russia or France that some doubt 
may be expressed upon her arrival, but 
( lilTord G. Fischer, who is bringing her 
nv<r, vouches for her nationality, although 
as the young woman speaks several lan- 
guages she may claim the country she 
prefers. 



KATIE BARRY MAY BE SUED. 

If there is one thing more than an- 
other that William L. Lykens, the agent, 
seems to enjoy it is a lawsuit. 

The latest defendant to the plaintiff, 
Lykens, is on the slate as Katie Barry. 
Mr. Lykens holds a written contract from 
Miss Barry, assigning the agent as her 
exclusive director while in vaudeville at 
a commission of ten per cent, on all moneys 
received for salary meanwhile. 

M. S. Bentham booked the English 
woman over the Keith circuit. No one 
provided for the commission Lykens be- 
lieves he is entitled to. Hence the legal 
action proposed. 



EASTERN WHEEL IN MONTREAL. 

Montreal, Canada, will have a burlesque 
theatre next season under the guidance 
of Weber & Rush, prominent members of 
the Columbia Amusement Company 
(Eastern Wheel). This is the Canadian 
town harboring the Royal Theatre, one 
of the original causes of the break in the 
burlesque field. 

It is possible that through an amicable 
arrangement Wilmcr & Vincent will with- 
draw their proposed plans for j vaude- 
ville theatre there. 



THE BOSTON MUSIC HALL. 

There is some vague talk about the 
prospects for the Boston Music Hall next 
season. It is now occupied by an ani- 
mal exhibition of some kind. The name 
of J. K. Mitchell of Mil ford, Mass., is con- 
nected with its future plans. 

The Music Hall has been discussed from 
several vaudeville points of view for sev- 
eral seasons. It is generally looked upon 
as the opening wedge in any campaign to 
be instituted against B. F. Keith. 



THE GERMAN REGIMENT'S BALL. 

The 2tlth anniversary of the Old Ger- 
man Fifth Regiment (Vcteranen-Verein) 

X. G. S. N. Y., will be celebrated at the 
Armory, 12 St. Mark's Place, on Sunday 
evening, March It (to-morrow). Harry 
Thomson, "The Mayor of the Bowery," 
is chairman of the committee. 



Howard Thurston and his assistant, 
Beatrice Foster, have completed their 
tour of Australia, and will play the va- 
rious islands in the Malay Archipelago, 
preparatory to a trip north, stopping at 
Manila and Honolulu after visiting China 
and Japan. 



SUED FOR COMMISSION. 

Agents do not always arrive via the 
ground floor. Witness the difficulty of the 
H. B. Marinelli Agency in collecting a few 
coins of the realm for bringing over the 
Viora trio and placing the act with the 
"Miss New York, Jr.," burlesque company. 

The trio had a lapse of memory after 
starting out on the tour, and Mr. Mari- 
nelli will sue for his commission, not be- 
cause he cares about the money involved 
but for a principle. 

The suit will be watched with interest 
by the other agents, not so much so on 
account of the principle as exemplified by 
the Marinelli office here, but for several 
reasons, two of the most important being 
"Can he get the money even after ob- 
taining judgment?" and "if it is paid, who 
will get it — Marinelli or the lawyer?" 



KEITH'S CHARITABLENESS. 

Recently at Syracuse the Council of 
Jewish Women there applied to Jule Del- 
mar, the Keith representative, for aid. 

Mr. Delmar consulted with the home of- 
fice in the St. James Building, and was 
instructed to take such steps as he thought 
commensurate with the circumstances, i 

An entire evening's net receipts of the 
Grand Opera House (Keith's) in Syra- 
cuse, amounting to $445, was turned over 
to the organization as a result. 



ALMOST UNPRONOUNCEABLE. 

Sasa Masalskaya is the musical cogno- 
men of a real Russian Countess whom 
Myers & Keller will introduce to vaude- 
ville here as a singer of Russian, French 
and gypsy ballads. This woman received 
her present name and title by marriage. 
Many a person has entered vaudeville for 
less reason. 



MADE A CHANGE. 

The managers of the Tiger Lilies bur- 
lesque company, after suffering a bad 
week at the London because they cut 
about $400 worth of acts out of the show 
for New York, learned their lesson, and 
put in De Loris at the Eighth Avenue this 
week. He proved a strong drawing card. 



WEBER MAY STAY. 

In view of the pronounced success of the 
latest burlesque at the Joe Weber Music 
Hall it is unlikely that the company will 
go on the road this season. 

Mr. Weber has stated he expects to play 
the piece throughout the summer. 



TOM MINER BACK. 

Tom Miner, who has been in Louisville 
reorganizing the Miner's Merry Buries- 
quers, returned home this week, leaving the 
show in excellent shape, having put In 
Jeanette Dupree, Nibbe and Bordeaux, and 
Crover. Higgins and Bergman. 



William Morris will move hi> residence 
as well as his oflice. He has purchased 
a house on Fort Washington Heights, 
around 170th street. The site overlook* 
the river. The residential move was 
caused in an endeavor of Mr. Morris to 
secure the exclusive booking of Freeman 
Bernstein't Palace Theatre in the same 
neighborhood. 



A new burlesque theatre will be built 
in Rochester by George H. Wilson if his 
present intention holds. 



CORKS ON CLOTHS. 

"Fine for the lilies," declared Corks as 
he and the waiter reached the table at 
the same time, the one with full seidls 
and The Human Corkscrew with a thirst. 

"I needed comfort of some sort, for I 
gave up the idea of doing that musical 
act until I could get my nerve fixed and 
I was out last week with my old contor- 
tion act in the Garden of Eden with a 
real Eve in a picture suit and me in a 
snake dress doing my contortion specialty. 

'Say, the nearest they came to a wood 
set was one with a palace on the back 
cloth and statues on the flippers. 
Wouldn't that jar you? Just Adam and 
Kve in the Garden of Eden, and there was 
a house ready built and statuary in the 
garden like Adam was the original presi- 
dent of the first steel trust. Shush! 

"Say, some of these days I'm going to 
find the real cash and I'm going to have 
a show shop that'll make the ones nowa- 
days seem like the discard from a penny 
vaudeville. I'm going to have some scen- 
ery and before the crowd can get tired of 
it I'm going to have some more and take 
the old away. 

"If I was taking home a set of cut glass 
I'd have a good string around it if I had 
to pay five cents for a whole ball and 
give the rest to the auction room (it's a 
cinch that I'd have to buy cut glass in an 
auction room), yet a manager will pay 
seven hundred dollars for an act and 
throw it in the same set that he has just 
used for a sixty dollar song and dance 
team and think it's plenty good enough. 

"On the level, some managers if they 
ever looked^at their own stages would be 
ashamed. Thpy havo the same old cloths 
that they had when they first went into 
business and they think that as long as 
they keep the back wall of the theatre 
hidden they are all right. 

"There are some big houses right here 
in town where they haven't spent a cent 
for scenery for two years and they wonder 
why it is that an act doesn't seem as good 
in their house as it does somewhere else. 
It's because the act is playing in a scene 
that's so old and dark that even a fire 
dance would iseem gloomy. 

"If I ever get a theatre I'll change all 
the cloth at least twice a year and I 
wouldn't turn the calcium on a specialty 
until I had enough spots and floods to 
make the stage right. 

"Nowadays a manager seems to think 
that if he has a lot of big names on the 
billboards he has all he needs. It's a 
mistake. New scenery means a whole lot 
and the old stuff would drive a man to 
drink"- a fact Corks proceeded to demon- 
strate with a fresh seidl. E. W. 8. 



TWO NEW STARS. 

At the commencement of the 1907-1908 
season Ryan and Richfield will blossom 
forth as the stars in a company to be or- 
ganized by Percy Q. Williams for the 
production of a play embracing the Will 
M. Cressy series of "Mag Haggerty" 
sketches, three of which have been played 
by the pair in vaudeville. 

I'p to that time engagements now con- 
tracted for will be kept. 



BENEFIT FOR FRANK WALSH'S WIFE. 
A benefit for the wife of Frank Walsh, 
who is now in Seton Hospital, has been 
planned for March 17 at Union Hall, 8 
Union Square. 






VARIETY 







Hope Booth. 
"Her Only Way." 
Keeney's. 

An impressive program Announcement 

is made on t lie occasion of the first ap- 
pearance of Hope Booth in vaudeville at 
Keeney's this week, the Will M. Creasy 
sketch "Her Only Way" being her me- 
dium. The scene is laid in the editorial 
looms of a daily newspaper boasting a 
couple of women reporters. The duties 
and love affair of one (Miss Booth) with 
a naval officer furnishes the scheme upon 
which the offering is based. The support 
is Frederick Sonier, (leorge Smith and 
Bessie Stephenson. The sketch is mildly 
received. The dialogue is humorous at. 
times, but that and the principal need 
some vigorous prodding. Sitne. 



James J. Corbett. 

Sketch. 

Proctor's Fifty-eighth Street* 

James J. Corbett has abandoned mono- 
logue for sketching and at the Fifty-eighth 
Street house this week made his debut in 
that capacity in "A Thief in the Night," a 
sketch written by Sidney Wilmer and 
played by himself for a few weeks some 
three years ago. Wilmer laid aside the 
sketch for management, and since that 
time the vehicle has lain dormant. It tells 
of a young man about town who has re- 
mained away from home for a long poker 
session. He arrives late- in the evening 
with his winnings, and is nervous regard- 
ing a man who has followed him. He en- 
counters a trained nurse called in to at- 
tend his mother-in-law. and believes her 
to be a locally famous woman burglar. Her 
efforts to induce him to take a dose of 
bromide is mistaken for an effort to ad- 
minister knockout drops that she may get 
away with the silver she has promised 
the old lady that she will take home over 
night. There are some bright lines in 
the act and in the humor of the former 
heavyweight champion fearing an attack 
from a thug. Mr. Corbett read his lines 
easily, though he did not always get out 
their full humor. Miss Tully, as the nurse, 
was miscast. The part was written for a 
nervous, assertive woman, and Miss Tully 
plays too placidly to point the situation. 
She should play more briskly, taking en- 
tire possession of her new patient. The 
other three characters are taken by extra 
people, appearing only at the climax. 

Chicot. 



\J 



Viola Gillette & Co. 
Accidents Will Happen. 
Gotham. 

Viola (lillctte, known through her ap- 
pearances in the Klaw & Erlanger panto- 
mimes, is passing a probationary vaude- 
ville period at the Gotham with the re- 
sult that she will probably get good time. 
The sketch is merely the excuse, for a 
singing specialty. It tells of the expected 
arrival at a bachelor's apartment of a rela- 
tive subject to fits. The bachelor is due 
at a fancv dress ball to meet a woman 
who has been selected for him by a match- 
maker. She arrives at the apartment, 
mistaking it for that of her friend, and 
proceeds to get into her own fancy 
dress one of her old boy costumes. There 
is a butler who thinks her the epileptic 
relative and a maid who does little or 
nothintr. Mi>s Gillette was in excellent 
voice and by her singing of several songs 
established herself fn favor. She also 



f NBW AGTS Or THE WCCKj 



carried off the part well. As much may 
not be said for George J. MacFarlane, 
who possesses a tine baritone but a poor 
stage presence. Sidney Bracy in the part 
of a comic butler was not effective, giv- 
ing too English a touch to his wiork. 
Dorothy Gilbert, the maid, did not even 
sing, but served as chaperon. Her entrance 
with various pieces of feminine apparel not 
usually exhibited was raw in the extreme 
and moreover unnecessary. This should be 
cut at once. The rest of the sketch will 
pass, the singing being the real feature. 

Chicot. 




Aurie Dagwell. 
Song Medley. 
Proctor's 23d Street. 

•The Songs of '61" make up the early 
half of Miss Dagwell's offering as before, 
but she changes into college gown and 
mortarboard cap, and finishes with a new 
medley of the well known American col- 
lege songs. 

'Hie idea is original with Miss Dagwell 
and has never been done before. It fits 
into the atmosphere created in the thea- 
tre by the war time songs that precede. 
The singer's beauty helps materially in 
1 he effect. 

The orchestration for the medley is by 
Charles Gebest, musical director for 
George M. Cohan, who completed the or- 
chestration just in time to allow for a re- 
hearsal or two on Saturday. Coke. 




\ 



Kosta. 

Contortionist. 

Keeney's. 

Kosta is a foreign contortionist, open- 
ing some time ago on a Sunday night at 
the New York Theatre. Since then he 
has played a few weeks around town. 
There is no doubt of Kosta's ability to 
contort himself, but it is the sensational 
feat of twisting his head about until he 
looks at the audience with his face and 
back at the same time that is the bone 
of contention. It is an unnatural perform- 
ance, and repulsive, but the act will cre- 
ate talk for that reason wherever played. 
Kosta now turns his head once only, 
while his collar and necktie remain on. 
That tones down the disagreeable appear- 
ance some, but the absolutely idiotic ex- 
pression on the man's face while in the 
peculiar position remains on the memory 
unpleasantly. Kosta is good enough in 
his line without the feature trick. What 
effect the comment caused by his appear- 
ance will have on attendance it is impos- 
sible to gauge. It may work either way. 
He is a curiosity and a scientific pussle. 

Siime. 



pearl personally ignorant of the fact. 
More confidence is necessary, and if ho 
will grind the belief into himself that 
Charles Whalen is funny, much more 
pleasure will accrue to the audience. Some 
of the old talk might be eliminated. The 
telling of the story wherein he threatens 
to whip every one is well worked up. 
With some particular attention given to 
the weak sj>ots there should be no neces- 
sity for Whalen and West to leave the 
[.Tailed States again for a long time to 

eome. Simc. 



Clifton Crawford. 

Monologue. 

Keith's. 

Announced as a new find of Joseph 
Hart's, the wonder is that Mr. Crawford 
was not provided by his discoverer with 
a better monologue. He is a rather dap- 
per young man with a squeaky voice and 
hair whitened a la Farkoa. He sings a 
song to the effect that women are a snare 
and a delusion, and that he will have no 
more to do with them, winding up the last 
verse by following off the stage a stun- 
ning young woman who is quite the most 
attractive part Of the act. This is fol- 
lowed by the recitation of a fragment of 
"The Charge of the Light Brigade" as 
various nationalities would interpret the 
lines, and in conclusion he recites "Gunjra 
Din," a Kipling poem, that does not gain 
him very great applause, though the 
verses are well read. Mr. Crawford in his 
present form will do well enough as a 
l>oom star. It may be that he will be 
able to change to gain a better of- 
fering, but unless he makes radical im- 
provement he will not long remain in this 
field. Chicot. 



Walters and Prouty. 
Comedy Sketch. 
Proctor's 23d Street. 

This team did emergency service this 
week, when they filled in the gap made by 
the illness of one of the members of the 
team of Kelly and Violette, who were 
forced to retire from the bill. 

The sketch employs two men and is 
designed on the traditional lines. The 
talk is mostly pretty broad burlesque, 
with flashes of brightness and originality. 
It is keyed for the easy appreciation of 
'upstairs," and in that locality it scored 
unmistakably. 

A burlesque Spanish dance by the He- 
brew comedian of the pair was funny in 
an uproarious way and won a general 
laugh. Coke. 



, 



Whalen and West. 
Songs and Dances. 
Pastor's. 

Charles Whalen and Carrie West- lately 
returned from Africa and appear at Pas*, 
tor's this week, but whether in a revised 
edition of their former offering is not 
Known. That is a matter of indifference, 
however, for the act now presented en 
titles the lea m to recognition. Miss West 
has a pleasing appearance and should be 
Allowed another song by herself. Mr. 
Whalen is a comedian, even though he ap 



Captain Woodward's Seals. 
Hippodrome. 

The present Capt. Woodward is the son 
of the original, and has taken charge of 
the act since the death of his father on the 
other side some time ago. New tricks 
are shown, and the best description of the 
act and its value may l>c found in the fol- 
lowing truthful Quotation from the Hippo 
drome program: 

"'llie Ki'iJt troupe of iiiMivt'lonsly pdtlefttcd 

Aliiftkn seal* iind am lions, trained ami performed 
i»y rnptulti Woodward. Introducing I^eo. the tnon- 
sior North Pole Juggler and Imlnnoor. with his In- 
telligent fellows, in a programme of Ineredllde 
1 »*- 1 f onriftneet . " 

Simc. 




The Borvinis. 
The Gaudschmidts. 
Four Webbs. 
Acrobatic. 
Hippodrome. 

The Borvinis have been playing this 
week only at the Hippodrome while the 
other two opened the week previously, lit 
the three the Borvinis are the best, doiie/ 
almost on the revolving globes what the 
others do on the ground. Two acts at 
tempt the head and feet balancing iir>l 
shown by the Stein-Erretto trouj>e. The 
four Webbs depend upon head and hand 
balancing altogether. The Gaudschmidts 
are clowns tvith a dog assistant. All the 
acts may have been compelled to cut some 
for time, but undoubtedly give the feature 
tricks. Nothing sensational or even novel 
is shown by either, and two of the acts 
have nothing new, even. Simc. 



1/ 



Johnnie Johns. 

Monologue. 

Imperial. 

Johns returns to the blackface mono 
logue after an absence of several years, 
during which he has been engaged in a 
commercial enterprise. His present vehi- 
cle sliows evidence of having been put to- 
gether hurriedly for present purposes and 
pieced out with several selected stories. 

In the main Johns made a good impres 
sion with his first Brooklyn audience, par 
ticularlv with his final song, which was 
the best thing he did. Coke. 



Diamond and Morton. 

Skit. 

Gotham. 



v 



This skit is offered by two young per- 
sons who have been playing in a bur- 
lesque company and who have mst in- 
vaded the straight field. They have an 
inconsequential skit, depending upon mis 
taken identity, that serves well enough 
for a small opening act but which will 
have to be improved before it can get a 
'setter place. The lines are weak and the 
comedy is unfunny. Miss Diamond gives 
promise of developing into a clever Irish 
comedienne in time. Mr. Morton will 
have to learn restraint before he can hope 
to get ahead. At present his idea of 
comedy appears to be merely noise mak- 



ing. 



Chicot. 



* 



. 



The Wilsons. 
Revolving Trapeze. 
Pastor's. 

A revolving ladder act is given by the 
Wilsons, and the apparatus is set on the 
floor instead of from the tlies. The size 
of the stage here rendered this necessarv, 
but from appe;i ranees there have been no 
preparations made for the other means. 
So new tricks are accomplished except 
In the 'breakaway" at. the finish, where 
the couple cling to one i>ole as the other 
side of the ladder falls away. 'Hiis is 
first rate and exciting. There is not enough 
to sustain it in the higher class houses. 

Simc. 



- 






Perry and Lang. 
"Dutch" Act. 
Pastor's. 

Two very young men who were put on 
in haste to fill in. They are neithei 
Dutch comedian! nor dancers, but t he 
dancing excels. About their onlv chance 
of success lies in the direction of dancing 



VARIETY 




only; any character and especially the 
Cerman kind, will spoil whatever chance 
of success they may have. Sime. 

/ 

Fred J. Hamill and Suzanne Halpin. 

"Going Into Vaudeville." 
Orpheum Theatre, Utica, N. Y. 

Fred J. Hamill of this city presents a 
musical comedy skit, "Going Into Vaude- 
ville," with the assistance of Miss Su- 
zanne Halpin. He was warmly greeted 
and more than made good. A number of 
his own songs are rendered and in every 
way the act is pleasing. In an automo- 
bile song a good effect is produced by the 
arrangement of a horseless wagon out of 
parlor furniture. Another song is "In 
Vaudeville." The skit was written, staged 
and produced by Barney Fagan, and the 
gowns were supplied by Mrs. Osborne. 

Sctah. 



OUT OP TOW 




Rillie Deaves & Co. 
Sketch. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 

Rillie Deaves and company, consisting 
of Fred Bowman and Ethel Bowman, 
opened at the Family Theatre this week. 
With a little judicious "blue penciling" 
the act will be a success. There is prac- 
tically no plot to the sketch, the dialogue 
being quite abrupt and inconsistent, mak- 
ing it difficult for the audience to catch 
the sense of the situations. Hut not with 
standing the too evident errors in con- 
struction, it will "go" in the hands of 
capable people such as these. The best hit 
in the act is Mr. Bowman's character 
study of the traditional "front row en- 
thusiast " gray-headed and old but will- 
ing to spend his money in exchange for 
a smile from the "beauties" of the stage. 
Miss Deaves as the "beauty" and the pres- 
ent wife of the old man shows traces of 
the "emotional" in her acting, but it is too 
evidently forced. Her imitation— or was 
it a travesty?— of Mrs. lyeslie Carter is too 
much of a departure from the nature of 
the sketch, and the only suggestion of 
Mrs. Carter is in her hair. The act 
doesn't, exactly fit the i>eople, but at the 
same time it would be very difficult to 
find other artists to fit this act. On the 
whole the act will be a success with a few- 
alterations. Mil ford Motccr*. 



Lizzie Daly. 

Dancing, Past and Present. 



■ 



Dockstader's, Wilmington. 

Lizzie Daly, one of the famous Daly 
family, makes presentation of a new danc- 
ing act, the scene of which is laid in a 
military camp. Her entrance is made in 
military costume, and she does hard shoe 
dancing of the old school sort, finishing 
with a drumhead pedestal dance. The 
stage is darkened for motion pictures, 
which show Miss Daly in various sorts of 
dancing as the lights go up again to show 
her in a costume duplicating that worn 
l»V the pictured dancer. She takes up the 
' dancing from that point, the pictures 
being used to permit her time for the 
costume change. The act went well for 
a new offering and should make a strong 
attraction. Vitro. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 

"The Artists' Forum" Is for the artists exclusively. Any lust complaint any artist may 
have or considers he has will be printed In this department. Or any comment that an artist 
may desire to make. 

Also any artist or act that disagrees with a reviewer on Variety In his review of the artist's 
work or act may have his criticism of the criticism printed in this column, and it will be 
nswered by the reviewer. 

Confine your letters to 150 words and write on one side of paper only. 



Seattle, March 1, 190(5. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir: In your issue of February 24, un- 
der 11ml "Artists' Forum," ('. S. Auer 
says he does not think the correspondent 

at Seattle sees the show, as in one of his 
notices he named two acts at one of the 
theatres which were not on the bill. He 
is right as he was referring to Trixeda and 
Robinson and another act which I don't 
remember. They were not on the Orpheum 
bill, as I said, but as the manager saw 
fit to have their names in the lobby and 
on the program in the same theatre you 
would be led to believe that such parties 
were there. I know the two people men- 
tioned personally, probably as well as the 
gentleman docs. 1 found afterward that 
they worked at the Star, which is under 
the same management, but as my letter 
had to leave here on Monday I am not 
supposed to know when the manager is 
going to transfer them from one theatre 
to another in the middle of the week. 

(/. 6, Harry. 
CarreapOndent at Seattle. 



Editor Variety: 

Sir -In a review of the Jersey Lilies 

at the Circle I was mentioned as the 

author of "Two Jolly Companions," in 

which Hanley, Logan and Hanley ap- 
peared some time ago. I do not desire 
the credit for something I did not do, 
and would be obliged for a correction to 
the effect that Mike Hanley wrote the 
sketch, not myself. I just played in it. 
that's all. Joe Raymond. 



Dubuque, la., March (5. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir — I wish to correct a statement in 
last week's Variety regarding the engage- 
went of the-Cherry Sisters duo -at my 
vaudeville theatre. I have engaged the 
sisters for a number of weeks, and in 
playing them in Dubuque turned patrons 
away from the theatre twelve times dur- 
ing their week's engagement, and there 
was no disorder of any kind. By letting 
the public know in advance that good 
order would be maintained for this act, 
and that the ladies could give their entire 
act without molestation, the same as any 
other act at my house, those who bad 
heard so much about the sisters and who 
had never had an opportunity to witness 
the performance, came in droves and 
brought their friends along four or five 
times during the engagement. The sis- 
ters have received the same good treat- 
meat at Des Moines, la., and at Spring 
field, 111., for the past two weeks, where 
they also broke records established prior 
by acts costing four times the money that 
the sisters receive. The ladies have new 
wardrobe, but their act is exactly the 
same in makeup as when they first ap- 
peared in their home schoolhouse near 
Marion. la. Jake Rosenthal. 



Henry and Alice Tavlor, the sharpshoot 

• w s 

era, will return from the other side shortly, 
having been booked over here until Janu- 
ary, 1007. 



LONDON. 

The (Jirl in Blue savs that she has 
reformed. If vou are from Missouri she 
is at the Ixmdon Theatre this week as 
the added attraction for Sim Williams' 
Ideals — a show which is lively enough not 
to need the aid of the garter distributing 
lady. Miss do Leon's dance is a consid- 
erable modification over the work she 
shows in the Western towns, but she is 
still as wriggly as a tadpole, and the 
garter distribution is a hit. She now in- 
dicates the favored persons, and they are 
compelled to walk down the aisle with 
the spot light shining on their mostly 
bald heads. She is costuming the act 
very elaWately now with spangles to 
help the effect. The show is one of those 
without olio and with but few specialties. 
It is a cut down from a farce in which 
Williams and Adams appeared, and it 
tells a half story— which is better than 
most. It deals with familiar situations 
and old jokes, but there is life in plenty 
and a lack of snap appears to be the 
characteristic of most of the shows this 
neashn. Here they have a large chorus 
(sixteen when they are all accounted for), 
and they are employed to good advantage 
They change their costumes frequently. 
are not above wearing tights, and in all 
wavs are more like the old fashioned 



Xew York, March 8, 100(5. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir T wish to inform you that there 
is only "one" Hose Kessner, and the same 
lady that has worked with me heretofore 
in my act, also the same Rose Kessner, 
is my wife, and no other lady. 

Harry Smirl. 

•chorus on which burlesque success was 
built than the modern affairs in which 
most of the time the girls are kept down 
cellar while the alleged comedians are 
given an opportunity. Frank O'Brien is 
the main comedy furnisher. lie has a 
crude style well suited to this sort of 
show, and he maintains a quick tempo 
throughout, bis least successful offering 
being his old specialty. The best specialty 
work is given by the Four Livingstons, 
who work some splendid risley tricks but 
dress the act so poorly that it does not 
have full effect. The time when aero 
batics in skirts was a novelty is long 
past and they would do well to adopt 
bloomers,, Cruet and Cruet ofTer an im- 
promptu specialty between the two acts, 
and there are a lot of concerted numbers. 
The best of these is a fencing number. 
Five and Allen do n < • t offer a specialty, 
but do some good work in the farce, and 
Katherine Klare siiiL'-^ frequently and sup- 
plies the statuesque element, the sou- 
hrette being Madeline Franks. Taken as 
a whole it is the best show seen on 
the Western Wheel this season because 
it possesses life. Chicot. 

Senate Lodge, Knights «»f Honor, will 
have a theatre party of 700 at the \m 
phion Theatre in Brooklyn on April -2." 



FAMILY. 

Three shows a day serve to keep the 
artists on edge at the Family Theatre. 
Reynolds and Philbrooks head the bill 
this week there with a "Dutch" act. 
Reynolds does not appear to advantage a- 
a German, and the talk in the sketch is 
rather drear. Miss lMiilbrook is Capable 
as a feeder, and with another sketch of 
brighter quality the team could please in 
the higher price houses, securing goo<| 
positions on the bills there. 

The Ben Hamodi trio are head bal 
ancers, and as such they do some really 
good work. The sta<:e presence indicates 
that this is their first public appearance. 
They need more assurance and a more 
brisk manner. 

Cunningham and Covernay, billed as a 
"knockabout comedy team," are anything 
but that. They sing and dance in quiet 
fashion, and it is a relief to hear "coon" 
songs sung in this style, Both seem to 
lack interest, but have a good appearance, 
with fair singing voices. Stricter appli- 
cation would soon land them in faster 
company. 

Burton's dogs are not on the program, 
having replaced Lillian and Shorty De- 
Witt, the latter having objected to their 
billing, and this combined with the failure 
to send on "paper," caused the manage- 
ment to cancel the odd sizes. 

The dogs did very well, but neither the 
animals nor their trainer appear well 
groomed. The usual run of dog tricks is 
given, with a leaping greyhound to finish. 

The Bates musical quartet, composed of 
three persons and a comedian, are musical 
on the program only. Banjos and saxo- 
phones are in use. The string instru- 
ments are only deserving of notice, 
Sousa's Harvard March song on the 
brasses being blown out of recognition. 

The electrical bells finish with the 
lights was more pleasing to the eye than 
to the ear. 

The Lorre trio and customary pictures 
filled out a bill well liked apparently. 



PAUL DRESSER'S TESTIMONIAL. 

Final arrangements have almost been 
completed for the testimonial to the late 
Paul Dresser. It will take place during 
the week commencing April 2 at the New 
York Theatre. 

All the prominent theatrical managers 
in the city have voluntarily consented to 
act as a committee and the entertain- 
ment to be offered will have the best 
known artists playing Xew York that, 
week. Mr. William A. Brady has con- 
sented to appear, and has also paid $100 
for a gallery seat. 

The subscriptions have been generous. 
Paul Dresser having had a legion of friends 
during his lifetime, none of whom he ever 
forgot. 

Mr. (Jeoijjc Unmans, who is in charge of 
the arrangements, was asked to attempt 
the testimonial by Louise Dres«er, Paul's 
foster sifter, and Mr. Horn an h took hold 
after it was found that Dresser died pen 
niless. 

There is no one familiar with all the 
circumstances who does not believe that 

the testimonial is timely and one of the 
very few that, should receive the undi- 
vided support of Hie theatrical and musical 

world. 



diaries Leonard Fletchei will leave for 

.Vl-t '.ili;i H<'\1 March, 



8 



VARIETY 



• 






Shows of the Week 



By Sime 



PASTOR'S. 

The bill this week at Pastor's is calcu- 
lated and adjusted to please from top to 
bottom. 

Maddox and Melvin in "At the Station" 
are the "added attraction" and make 
good in their offering, with Maddox's 
comical makeup as a messenger boy, he 
being the first to introduce that charac- 
ter in vaudeville. Miss Melvin was 
obliged to cut one song through another 
act having the prior right in this house. 
The sketch could be further improved by 
having a back drop showing a railroad 
yard, carrying out the idea as then seen 
through the "center door." 

Ward and Ourran in "The Terrible 
Judge" received their share of laughs, and 
this team, and more especially Ward, have 
an "extern" style of handling their dia- 
logue which is sufficient to carry through 
any offering they may care to attempt. 
Curran should replace the hackman and 
the stuttering story. It is too good and 
has been left out too long to be entirely 
forgotten. 

Kelly and Kent receive several curtain 
calls on their dancing finish, which is 
worked so quickly and so well that the 
audience demands more. The Chadwick 
Trio in "Hank Hoover's Holiday" have a 
big card in Ida May Chadwick, who twice 
won the buck dancing championship and 
wears the medal proudly on her breast. 
Mr. Hoover gives too much attention to 
the "gosh darn" type of rural delivery. 
That species has passed away on the 
stage. If he brings out the new act prom- 
ised he should cling more closely to the 
legitimate "rube." 

Williams and Melburn in "Just for 
Fun," signifying nothing, manages to 
please. Miss Melburn does a great deal 
with "Coming Through the Rye, Jennie 
Mine," considering her voice, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Stuart Darrow in different hand 
made pictures and the Migniani family 
were also on the bill. 

Johnson and Wells, the colored team, 
labored hard to win the applause they re- 
ceived. Duke Wells is giving his atten- 
tion to the act, which is steadily improv- 
ing, although it could be helped still 
further along by Miss Wells dressing her 
hair in some different fashion, the pompa- 
dour lying over her temple not helping 
any, even though three effective changes 
of costume are made. 

Bertina and Biockway, a 'sister act," 
have some contortions by Miss Bertina, 
while both of the girls dance. The Ber- 
tina girl is too stout for good work as a 
contortionist and more attention should 
be given to the dancing. The one song 
sung is ample. 



NOVELTY. 

Manager Harry Leonhardt of the Nov- 
elty is growing decidedly popular over in 
the Williamsburg end of Brooklyn, even 
before he has grown sufficiently acclimated 
to distinguish a "Greenpointer" from a 
"South.sider." 

The Royal Hungarian Boys' Band is on 
the list this week. The audience likes it 
notwithstanding the patriotic finale with 
a Sousa interlude and an American flag 
finish, even though the bass drummer does 
beat the most noise possible out of his 
instruments, having particular pleasure 



with the cymbals. Some of the "boys" 
visit the barber daily. 

Thompson and Vidocq are appearing 
with Vidocq in whiteface. He is better 
under the cork, where he can take more 
liberties and draws more laughs. The sea- 
soned "stuff" seems to go better under the 
shadow of darkness. Thompson ranks well 
a rpight man, but it requires the col- 

01 mannerisms of Vidocq to make the 
points. 

Carter De Haven and Flora Parker re- 
placed Thomas O'Brien Havel and Eflie 
I/awrence on the bill. Mr. De Haven has 
discontinued his disagreeable and audible 
directions on the stage, and the act sounds 
much cleaner in consequence. There is no 
prettier picture in vaudeville than Miss 
Parker. It required some harsh comment 
to compel De Haven to realize the mistake 
made in enforcing commands in hearing of 
his audience. If he has dropped that final- 
ly the offering will receive a much better 
reception. De Haven is not disagreeable 
personally, and if he cannot succeed with 
his wife, songs and himself, it is due to 
his own poor showmanship in not adapting 
the present sketch to a more suitable 
style. The encore is really funny. 

The Golden Gate Quartet, colored sing- 
ers and dancers, have installed a complete 
outfit of evening suits, with a musical 
number. The "chicken" has been buried, 
but the Chinese part still remains. The 
act as a whole at present is superior to 
the former one. 

Jewell's Mannikins as the headliner is 
the usual hit, and the Carson Brothers, in 
opening with hand balancing, could im- 
prove the appearance by closing in black 
altogether, the flood light being unneces- 
sary as the spot light would then be suf- 
ficient. • *> ^ 

C. W. Littlefield gives his usual imper- 
sonations, having a new finish, and Law- 
rence and Harrington in a "sketch" have 
a modern advertising medley, and secure 
much applause through the "tough" finale. 



AMPHION. 

If the Amphion quits the vaudeville 
field, as has been reported, it will remove 
one big family part}', for every one works 
in harmony at the Bedford avenue house 
and Manager Frank Murtha is in direct 
touch with every detail of the perform- 
ance, maintaining perfect discipline both 
in front and back of the footlights. 

Cressy and Dayne in "Bill Biffins' 
Baby," held over for the second week, but 
Louise Dresser is the feature of the bill, 
singing three songs, and receiving more ap- 
plause than even her husband, Jack Nor- 
worth, who is a close second. Mr. Nor- 
worth has added a new song in the shape 
of an antidote to the "Father" one. There 
are several singing teams using a similar 
number, and Mr. Norworth might replace 
it by something more exclusive. 

Booker and Corbley in "The Walking, 
Delegate" were well liked. Booker creates 
all the fun in the character of an Irish 
hod or briek carrier. The time could be 
shortened to have only the meat of the 
piece in evidence, and a third man, even 
if only a dummy, would help the effect. 
Booker's Irishman is creditable, more so 
than the "straight" Irish part of Corbley. 

The Florenz troupe of acrobats now 
have a young girl wit#i them, who may be 
under or over the limit, but she. i* a very 



good acrobat, and the act runs off with 
more vim in consequence, the action hav- 
ing been widened out and quickened. A 
new trick is also shown by the boy mount- 
ing four high. A "triple" is counted, but 
the count is the nearest approach to it, 
being a "double" only. 

Daisy Harcourt in her English songs 
and impersonations has appeared to bet- 
ter advantage. Her mannerisms are her 
own, without variation, a fault she should 
correct. The final number of the gallery 
god is the best liked. 

O'Brien and Buckley in a sometimes 
musical act opened the bill, and O'Brien 
creates amusement through his horseplay 
and size. He introduces a milk bottle, 
which does not stamp him as a comedian 
of originality, and both O'Brien and Buck- 
ley say "I done" when it should be "I 
did." 

Byers and Herman in a pantomimic 
bounding rope and contortion act show a 
few good tricks in both directions, with 
their own drop. One is a good contortion- 
ist, while the performer on the rope with 
a heavy balancing pole allows too much 
sway to the rope to give the effective 
finish for his sudden stops after bound- 
ing which he hopes for. As an act of its 
kind, though, it ranks fairlv well. 



KEENEY'S. 

Keenejr'i Theatre has one standard fea- 
ture that does not change in Hubert 
Creamer, in the box office. He chaffs 
the women folk, young and old, and while 
many of the feminines presumably drop 
in the house to see the show, it is only 
in reality an excuse to catch a sight of 
the fair haired, good looking young man 
who doles out the coupons. 

The other feature this week is Hope 
Booth, reviewed with Kosta under New 
Acts. 

Grace Cameron sings four songs, with 
changes, all the while wearing a pair of 
black cotton (not even lisle) stockings. 
At least silk might be afforded, and the 
"kid" song should be dropped. It wouldn't 
do for "amateur" night. Miss Cameron is 
very well liked by the audience, particu- 
larly in the "Dolly Dimples" number. 

Ziska and King in sleight-of-hand tricks 
fairly please, mostly with the comedy. 
Why the straight man attempts the ac- 
cent is problematical. He deceives no 
one. The comedian blackened up might 
obtain more results. The Heras Family, 
in acrobatics, show nothing especially new 
or startling, and have a boy dressed as a 
girl for the top mounter. It would be 
better to have him appear in his proper 
person and for the women to doff the 
skirts. 

Hathaway and Walton, in wooden shoe 
dances, with one song, have a short but 
neat act. Miss Walton appears in her 
second change in one of the handsomest 
costumes worn by any woman dancer, so 
handsome in fact that it should be worn 
throughout the act. 

Josephine Newman and Lillian Knowles, 
in their melange, help out to quite some 
extent by one of the girls posing as a 
doll. The effect of the singing the doll 
does could be greatly increased if the 
other member of the toam would "rough 
bouse" the act at this point, dragging the 
"d«Jl" around the stage (if she can 
ft.njH it), the singing to be kept up 



meanwhile in the same monotone, other 
wise it should be dropped. 

Kurtis and Busse, with some dogs, 
open the bill, and have well trained ani- 
mals, but show no judgment in the use 
of lights or setting. The spot light should 
be used only in the finale for the revolv- 
ing, with the possible exception of the 
tightrope. A "talking" canine is well 
worked, and the act could be built up to 
rank with any similar one. 



CIRCLE. 

A cheaply put together burlesque show 
is the Rose Sydell's London Belles, 
under the management of W. S. Campbell, 
appearing at the Circle this week. Joseph 
Shepp, a former partner of Campbell, is 
now the electrician of the company, and 
all the wealth in sight is represented by 
the diamonds worn on the persons of Miss 
Sydell and Mr. Campbell, the latter claim- 
ing distinction for having the largest and 
most expensive watch charm in burlesque, 
after Al Reeves. 

Campbell himself does the work of 
three men to save the salary of one. He 
appears in the olio with James Wesley 
Mack, stretching the turn out with mov- 
ing pictures and the aid of girls posing 
as statues to an interminable length, 
while also taking the leading parts in the 
two pieces. Campliell creates no furore in 
either, being in no danger of having a 
complaint laid against him for funnine>s. 

The single sheets displayed on the bill- 
boards still have Johnny Weber's pictures, 
although he has been out of the cast for 
some time. 

The opening, called "Dazzling Nancy." 
by Barney Gerard and J. Edwin Owens, 
allows the same Mack to be made a base- 
ball of through his size. This Mack is the 
cause of the hit of one number, sung by 
Rose Sydell and the chorus. He wrestles 
with Vera Hearte, tripping up a couple 
of the girls for the finale, and the audi 
ence never tires of seeing it done. 

Miss Hearte stands well up in the air 
and takes up a great deal of room side- 
ways, but has a better figure than Miss 
Sydell, who appears in the first part in a 
pink dress and sings with a faded voice. 

Kloise Adams is another heavyweight, 
while Doris Mae Owens is a principal 
twice over through "doubling," neither 
part being hardly noticeable, and Katie 
McCall has a line on the program to her- 
self also. 

The music is the best part of a show 
which draws well despite its drawbacks, 
one of the unfathomable problems of 
burlesque. 

Nothing in the olio deserves mention 
excepting The Great Relyea, who does a 
cabinet physical culture act, perfectly dis- 
gusting, as any act of that sort usually is. 
but made more so in this case by hi* 
abnormal developments and "rubber skin." 



A BIG SHOW. 

It is rumored, without positive verifica 
Hon being obtainable, that a vaudeville 
show will tour, commencing in April, com- 
posed only of headliners of the Grace Von 
Studdiford, Fred Walton, Junic McCrcc 
and Empire City Quartet calibre. 

The rumor also says that the purpose i> 
to send the show over the Keith eireui 4 
cities as opposition. The whole affair h:\> 
a most "pipy" appearance and sound. 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 






By Chicot 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

Stuart is made the feature at Hammer- 
stein's this week, and for those who like 
that sort of thing he is a good card. There 
was an inclination to guy the other even- 
ing, for Stuart has developed some tricks 
of posture designed to display his steel- 
plated shape that excite ridicule. He 
sticks to some old songs but sings 
Dearie" very well indeed. The best part 
of his act is the announcement that this 
is his last week in America. It is to he 
hoped that it is. There is a new brother 
in the Crane Brothers' act taking the place 
of Belmont. His makeup is almost an 
exact reproduction of Belmont's, but he 
has not yet worked into the act. The 
effect is not greatly hurt, for the real 
Cranes take good care of the comedy, and 
the act is good for a long laugh. The new 
man will work in better when he has the 
opportunity. The Vassar Girls have their 
musical act here, and stand sadly in need 
of shoe dressing. As the footgear is fitted 
with wires for the lamps the shoes come 
under the head of properties, and the 
property man should be required to keep 
them blackened. The effect is bad when 
they first come out in the college gowns. 
They make good music, and other acts 
could with profit study their selections, 
which for the greater part are good and 
unhackneyed. The electrical effect at the 
close is striking, but the act purely as a 
musical offering and with smarter cos- 
tumes could be used to almost as great 
a profit. Arthur Dunn and "company" 
(he used to mention Miss Glazier by 
name) perform the same old act. Dunn 
always smashes a table at Hammerstein's, 
and on Monday afternoon the event came 
off according to schedule. The beauty of 
seeing the act here is that they have no 
trap room and the shoot the chutes piano 
stool has to be omitted. Mr. Dunn would 
confer a favor on the world in general by 
getting a new joke occasionally. One 
everv six months would be enough for a 
starter. Tie has not had one in six years. 
Marion Carson drops down in her song* 
for three reasons. The first of these is 
that she is nbsolutelv without animation. 

* 

Tier face is stolid throughout, and she 
deadens her audience. Her songs are bad- 
ly chosen and are sung in so quick a 
tempo that there is little time for ex- 
pression or shading. The Five Mowatts 
made one of the real hits with their club 
work. It is pretty work, and at times 
they go through the routine, without drop- 
ping clubs. Then there are other times. 
Melville and Stetson are still popular with 
the larger portion of the audience. Those 
who do not like them dislike them with 
enthusiasm. Ed P. Reynard has changed 
his act a little. He no longer makes a 
scandal by having it appear that his aged 
couple were leaning up against the fence 
all night. The Dancing Mitchells scored. 
They should get the act more in accord 
with their music or vice versa, and they 
should give the act more form. It is too 
disjointed. 



at the downtown theatre. James J. Cor- 
bett is the headliner, his offering being 
reviewed under New Acts. Another strong 
hit is the Three Keatons, including 
"Buster," the human mop. The way the 
youngster is thrown about the stage with- 
out damage to else than his clothes is a 
thrilling sight, and yet Keaton declares 
that he has to moderate the act here in 
town on account of the Gerry Society. 
The youngster should be encouraged to 
smile. As things are his intense gravity 
is too long maintained. Louis Simon and 
Grace Gardner appealed to the upstairs 
crowd in particular. They turn the stage 
upside down before the close of their per- 
formance, and every time there is a break- 
age there is a fresh roar. Eddie Leonard 
and the Sharp Brothers please with some 
really clever dancing, and Dave Lewis 
fared well when it is considered that Dan 
McAvoy has the same idea of an entrance, 
and that he was here last week. McAvoy 
also has Lewis' song and other persons 
have had various bits of the dialogue. 
There is scarcely an original line in the 
entire piece. His own work has the unctu- 
ousness of a file. The girls appeared to be 
strange in the act, some of them not even 
knowing the simple business of the songs. 
They are scarcely to be commended for 
looks or cleverness. Theresa Kenz and her 
white horses scored with the audience, and 
Joseph Allinei and his monkey found ap- 
plause in plenty. The monkey was feeling 
like work the other afternoon and went 
through his performance with celerity. At 
times the act is lengthened several minutes 
by its refusals. Augusta Close scored a hit 
in spite of being compelled to work the 
entire act on the apron. Here the need of 
a little dancing in the turn was severely 
felt. Wills and Hassan open the show with 
some very good work, almost too good to 
be placed so early on the bill. The show 
was hurt to an extent by stage waits, of 
which there were two long ones. Acts in 
one are hard to get, but some side step 
should be devised. 



FIFTY-EIGHTH STREET. 

There is much doing on the bill at the 
Fifty eight li Street house this week, and 
they are playing to big business. The at- 
tendance has been increasingly good, and 
ever since it was realized that a rougher 
class of act is needed at this house than 



KEITH'S. 

Joe Hart without his pad and Carrie De 
Mar without her yellow wig are the head- 
liners at Keith's this week. Mr. Hart has 
played without his familiar stomach pad 
before, but in this sketch he takes a 
juvenile part, and the audiences do not 
appear to be able to realize that it is the 
same Joseph Hart. Miss De Mar's smile is 
her trade-mark and she is more easily 
recognized. The sketch is scarcely up to 
the standard of their earlier offerings. 
For all of that they made a hit, which 
they spoiled with their "follow my leader" 
recall. Clifton Crawford, a new vaude- 
ville!' discovered by Mr. Hart, is to 1k> 
found under the New Acts classification. 
Le Roy and Clayton got a lot of curtain 
calls because the stage manager was 
prompt in getting the curtain up and 
down before the applause died out. They 
scored with "A Horse on Hogan," and 
took a couple of the calls legitimately. 
The Waterbury Brothers and Tenny are 
among the laugh makers, but they should 
cut out the Swiss bells. The bells are not 
well attuned and they are archaic. 1'ost 
and Russell did well with what thev had, 
but need more material. Thev should cut 
out the song and put in more dancing and 
acrobatic work. They are both clever, 



but they seem afraid of doing too much. 
James J. Morton was a success as usual, 
and the Larsen sisters offered their bar 
work. The Kates brothers have an acro- 
batic turn with some fair tumbling and 
a lot of awkward knockabout work. The 
latter is not funny, being too obviously 
faked. The comedian has a very poorly 
developed sense of humor. The Arlington 
Four danced well, but their singing was 
shrill. They need a bass to balance the 
tonal volume properly. Hodges and 
Launchmere did a little dancing, but de- 
voted most of their time to their sing- 
ing. Their singing will give any one a 
headache within five minutes, and they 
should not be permitted to inflict this 
performance on the audience, more par- 
ticularly when their work consists of the 
cat duet, bits from "Olivette" and similar 
stuff. If they are permitted to sing at 
all they should be forced to obtain newer 
material, but there is no reason, save 
economy, why they should be permitted to 
come on the stage at all unless they are 
willing to do the dancing which formed 
their first and only excuse. Hubert De 
Veau still sticks to his old act, though he 
is said to have a new one ready. He 
would do well to leave the figure in the 
foreground out of the snow scene. The 
figure is so badly drawn as to throw the 
rest of the picture into disrepute. His 
fish group is the best thing he does. He is 
dressing in much better taste than he did, 
and his improved appearance helps his 
work. There were pictures, as usual, 
though they do not always run the stere- 
opticon. 



HYDE & BEHMAN'S. 
Rose Coghlan has the place of honor on 
the Hyde & Behman bill this week, pre- 
senting the familiar "Ace of Spades" with 
the assistance of Lynn l'ratt. Her work 
is still virile, and in her moments of emo- 
tion she showed her old power. As much 
may not be said for Mr. Pratt, for there 
were times when his effort to be in the 
part rendered him almost effeminate. This 
was not always his fault, and he needs 
to guard against the development of 
this mannerism, for he is a valu- 
able aid to Miss Coghlan, reading his lines 
with delightful distinctness and playing 
without overact ion. The Dollar Troupe 
were handicapped the early part of the 
week by the absence of one of the men 
and the fact that the youngest top- 
mounter was in the act for the tirst time 
in several weeks, a broken arm having 
compelled a layoff. Thev use a see-saw 
Catapult if or several of their tricks with 
good effeet. They should work out more 
along the same lines. Nicholson and Nor- 
ton showed their dressmaking skit and 
Paul Nicholson scored as usual with his 
almost perfect reproduction of James J. 
Oorbett. Thev both went well until the 
finish, when they dropped with a song 
that would have scored earlier in the act, 
but which was too quiet for the climax. 
The act itself but little resembles that 
originally shown under the same title, 
having been greatly Improved. Nat I*c 
Roy and Minnie Woodford have a talking 
act in which smart jokes and survivors of 
the Hood are jumbled together. If I^e 
Roy would take his mind off boarding 
houses and go through the rest of the 
act, sending the veterans to the Old Joke*' 



Home, he would have an offering that 
would be good. As it stands the old 
jokes pull the average of the act down. 
Halliday and Leonard offer a real old- 
time Irish act. Leonard's difficulties of 
speech make most of the fun, for there 
is little to the act that is new. Halliday 
makes a good feeder, and did they get 
down to date they would score. Fagan 
and Byron offer their dancing novelty and 
win plenty of applause with it, and Calla- 
han and Mack drew so much appl tuse for 
the piping that it rather interfered with 
the act. It always appeals because there 
is real human interest in the act. Delto- 
relli and Clissando have their old musical 
act to open the show. It has grown very 
tiresome. Pictures form the closing fea- 
ture, as usual. The show is made better 
by the smartness with which it is run off. 
This week there is one change from an 
interior with a carpet down and plenty 
of furniture to an exterior with a pad 
that is made in just thirty seconds, a rec- 
ord for the stage crew to be proud of. 



GOTHAM. 

Two nets are new on the Gotham bill 
this week, and are found under their 
proper classification. The bill as a whole 
is well considered — one of the best of this 
season — with plenty of comedy of varying 
sorts. Gates and Nelson work out a 
short act of juggling and jumping on the 
running globes. Some of the tricks are 
above the average, but a lack of show- 
manship is shown in not dressing the act 
more smartly. With the act better dis- 
played the turn should find plenty of time 
about town, for they have good work. 
Fred Ray and company scored a hit with 
Kay's Roman travesty. He reads his lines 
sonorously, and by this seriousness points 
some really amusing dialogue. His new 
support is not altogether satisfactory. 
She reads her lines in a stilted fashion 
that robs the situation of part of its fun. 
She should take her cue from Ray and try 
to play the part with dignity and 
strength. Charles F. Semon gained 
plenty of applause for his good work. 
His act is one that appeals both to the 
eye and the ear, for he has a funny per- 
sonality as well as skill as a musician. 
He puts in some new dialogue that is 
decidedly good. It is a pity he failed 
to discover that his greater success lay 
in monologue before he did. The Fitz- 
gildron -.McCoy trio were the laughing hit 
of the bill, Fit /.gibbon's slapstick style 
being exactly what the audiences like over 
here. It is an inane sort of offering with 
the time worn if not time honored com- 
edy devices, but in spite of the antiquity 
of the work it makes a strong hit in 
houses where rough comedy is appreci- 
ated. Burke and Dempsey were at times 
a little too subtle for the matinee audi- 
ences, but there was more obvious com- 
edy in plenty, and they made a hit with 
their song stuff and talking. They do 
well in getting away from the hackneyed 
makeups and find a sharper contrast in 
more legitimate costuming. Pongo and 
Leo do a revolving pole act that seemed 
to please, but little of their ground 
tumbling, which precedes the stick work, 
is of importance The pictures, as usual, 
made a hit. Next week they have the 
Hungarian Boys' Band, a notable engage- 
ment for a house of this size. 



IO 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Coke 



IMPERIAL. 

Kroiii Field! ami Wolley, the German 
comedians, who open the bill, to Thoinp 
sou's Elephants, the Imperial furnishes 
good entertainment this week. The Fields 
and Wolley airship dialogue has much ef- 
fective humor, and Ine pair were at some 
pains to ring in localized lines aplenty. 
The police controversy between Deputy 
Mack and Commissioner Bingham came in 
for a whole song parody and scored. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew, in "The Yel- 
low Dragon," were featured. The sketch 
has several good melodramatic points, and 
while it runs somewhat to the dime novel 
>tyle in diameter and treatment," it is 
played in a quiet and subdued tore that 
lifts it safely out of the dime novel school 
into a class somewhat approaching "Sher- 
lock Holmes." The narrative of the play 
let is an interesting one and is cleverlv 
told. 

The Four Bards mav not be "the world's 
greatest acrobats," as the program says, 
but they are a well appearing quartet, and 
do a quantity of really sensational tum- 
bling. Their work in two high hand-Stands 
was exceedingly well done, and the whole 
performance is executed almost entirely 
without the pretension and parade that 
acts of the sort, particularly the imported 
brands, are prone to indulge in. 

I^es Remo Pantomime Troupe are of the 
well known sort. They work hard and to 
some effect, but their performance has lit- 
tle in it that could be ailed novel, except 
that they leave the actual slapstick out. 
That instrument, so essential to panto- 
mime, however, is present in spirit if not 
actually "in the flesh." 

Sabel Johnson was in good spirits and 
voice, also she was in a princess gown of 
delicate pink. Miss Johnson's generous 
person took up all the room there was 
inside the bodice, but had the satisfaction, 
thanks to a skillful dressmaker, of being 
strictly a la mode and looking well. Her 
group of war songs and the plantation 
melodies were enthusiastically received. 

The tall person of Hayes and Healy 
should think up something to justify 
drawing down his portion of the joint sal- 
ary once a week. The dwarf of the pair 
has all the work to do, and it is very 
largely due to his efforts that the sketch 
scores as well as it does. There is much 
room for improvement in the sketch, 
which with the right sort of material 
could l>e made a fairly valuable one. 

Thompson's Elephants closed the bill be- 
fore the motion pictures. Thompson could 
make the offering brighter by freshening 
up the trappings of the act. 

Grant and Grant have a dancing and 
singing sketch that is bright and full of 
action. The man has a good negro voice. 
Both dance gracefully and dress with 

taste. 



Thomas O'Brien Havel's father died last 
week, necessitating the canceling of this 
week's engagement at the Novelty. This 
is the second sad loss suffered by Mr. 
O'Brien Havel in a short time, his wife. 
Clara Havel, recently having passed away. 



COLONIAL. 

Rigo'i injured hand recovered sufficient- 
ly for him to play one solo, but he still 
bids for sympathy from the feminine por- 
tion of the audience by ap|>earing at first 
with his poor, dear lingers swathed in 
bandages. The bandage came off when 
the erstwhile charmer of the Princess 
Chimay started to play. Then the in- 
valid digits displayed fifty-seven varieties 
of agility, but the violinist came back 
with a refusal of an encore by holding 
up the hand with a sorrowful shake of 
liis head. Whereupon innumerable pairs 
of expensive elbow gloves, weie split in 
an ecstasy of womanly sympathy. As a 
violinist Kigo rises little above the 
mediocre but as a charmer he is a men- 
ace to this commonwealth. 

Much more American and, to the mas- 
culine mind, much more entertaining, is 
Charles Leonard Fletcher. His imper- 
sonations are careful and studious, and 
his talents, which cover a wide range, are 
of no mean order. The one objection to 
this performance is perhaps that he has 
chosen his characters with a view to 
strong melodramatic appeal rather than 
to the quieter effects. Thus in his act 
appear Fagin, of "Oliver Twist." the 
dipsomaniac Ooupeau from "I/Aasoan- 
inoir." Emilc Zola's novel, and a scene 
from "At the Telephone." The act leaves 
strong impression on any audience, but 
t her accumulation of horrors is not entire- 
ly agreeable. Much pleasanter and not 
a. whit less forceful was the impersonation 
of William Gillette as Sherlock Holmes, 
in which both the makeup and acting of 
Fletcher were faithful. 

"Just Dorothy," the comedy playlet 
given by S. Miller Kent, is clean and re- 
freshing. The interest is fairlv well sus- 
tallied and the playlet closes with an ade- 
quate climax. 

Walter C. Kelly's monologue is well 
worth while. From his unassuming en- 
trance Kelly was only a minute or two 
in establishing cordial relations with his 
audience. As the monologue progressed 
this was strengthened and his picture 
of a Southern police court in session won 
him a spontaneous recall. 

Cliffe Berzac's animal circus compelled 
laughter by the force of its clowning. 
Berzac's announcement! are more subtly 
humorous. 

Emma Cams has a new gown of color 
and construction not to be described. But 
her singing is the same. 

Brandow and Wiley were a pair of col- 
ored dancers and singers, whereof the 
man was "real coon" and good, and the 
woman a more educated person who mer- 
cifully occupied little of the allotted 
t ime. 

Frank ami Jen Latonia did comedy and 
furnished music. Under the latter head 
the songs of the woman and a solo by 
the man on a one-string 'cello merited 
the reception that was accorded them. 
The Millman Trio of wire performers 
closed the hill except for the pictures. 



For the first time since the Novelty in 
Brooklyn was thrown open as a theatre 
speculators appeared in front of the house 
last Sunday night. Manager Harry Leon- 
hart used the "big stick." Fi-nin-ish. 



Lee Harrison has contracts calling for 
his appearance in vaudeville on April 30 
and thereafter. He will leave the Weber 
show to keep his engagements on time. 



ALHAMBRA. 

They're playing protean all the way 
across the board, show, place and to win 
at the Alhambra this week, beginning 
with Henri de Vries, who, of course, is the 
head and front of the proteans, and run- 
ning through two other items of the bill. 

The next of the proteans is McWaters, 
Tyson and company in an offering called 
"A new and original dancing and singing 
novelty." The sketch ojiens with a chorus, 
runs into a bunch of impersonations by 
McWaters, and closes with a song accom- 
panied by pocket-sized spectacular effects. 
It is full of agreeable surprises, is well 
dressed and comes up to standard in all 
the particulars of musical numbers, lines 
and other incidentals, and Miss Tyson is 
the big number of the act. She has the 
gift of making friends across the foot- 
lights, and it is largely by her spontaneous 
efforts that a cold audience was made to 
wake up and take notice on Monday night. 

Albert Bellman and Annie Moore weigh 
in as proteans, too. Their sketch, "A Bit 
of Vaudeville," involves numerous makeup 
changes, and carries the principals through 
a wide diversity of characters. Both are 
fortunate in the possession of a large de- 
gree of talent, and the woman of the pair 
has a decidedly agreeable voice. 

Herbert Brooks, in addition to his card 
tricks, which involve some sleight-of-hand 
work of an unusually smooth and skillful 
sort, has a mystifying trunk illusion that 
kept the audience guessing completely. 
The mechanical portions of Brooks' act are 
exceedingly well arranged and managed, 
but he would do well to brush up his pat- 
ter. Less explanation and a dash of bright 
humor would materially aid the perform- 
ance. 

Clarice Vance came into the evening's 
bill in a good position, when the auditors 
were in a humor to appreciate the quiet 
delicacy of her delightful Southern songs. 
At Miss Vance's hands the Southern 
"coon"' song loses all of its roughness and 
becomes a sort of negro classic to rank 
with the old-time plantation melodies. 

The Picchiani Family's acrobatic com- 
bination closed the bill. "In numbers 
there is strength" should be their profes 
sional motto. The eight members fill 
the stage with movement and color, and 
give a Aort of whirlwind impression, but 
otherwise there is little that is worthy 
of exceptional praise in the act. The 
eight work with smoothness and what is 
called "style," but it would seem that 
with an eight member troupe they might 
evolve something more nearly approaching 
novelty in their act. 

Edwin La tell, blackface comedian, was 
replaced by the S|>ook Minstrels, whose 
vocal work was satisfying and earned a 
couple of recalls. 

Cabaret's acrobatic dogs show some 
novelty, but the performance is none too 
well arranged and does not work up to 
a proper climax. 

Ford and Dot West were placed very 
early on the bill, but managed to make 
their impression. They dress in taste, 
and their dances are well liked. 



PROCTOR'S 23D STREET. 

William Courtleigh is holding down the 
headline position at Proctor's Twenty 
third Street Theatre this week for the sec- 
ond time, with Campbell McCulloch's new 
protean play, "The Third Degree." The 
miniature drama has found itself, as sea- 
men say of new ships. Mr. Courtleigh has 
improved appreciably, and the sket'h has 
been pruned and prodded under expert 
hands into better shape than ever. One 
piece of "editing" that has worked to the 
unmistakable advantage of the play is 
the elimination of the melodramatic cli- 
max, in which the wife of the guilty War- 
ner formerly appeared in all the proini 
nence of the spot light and delivered a 
bitter denunciation of her conscience 
stricken husband. 

Charles E. Evans and company share 
feature honors with Courtleigh. "It's Up 
to You, William," is written in a vein of 
farcical humor that is familiar to Ameri- 
can audiences. Mr. Evans is fortunate in 
the jH>ssession of a sketch in which this 
quantity is deftlv handled. Mr. Evans 
appears acceptably in his usual vein and 
has apparently trained his support to a 
like degree of excellence. 

Dan McAvoy's funniments were as 
fresh and breezy as usual, and his Fifth 
Avenue (Jirls as unobtrusively pretty as 
ever. McAvoy makes a mistake in hav- 
ing his girls appear in the ungraceful male 
attire of a "busted troupe" as the climax 
of his act. 

The Melani Trio is a wise trio. It 
possesses conspicuous musical ability and 
the members have uniformly good voices. 
They are content to let it go at that, 
without displaying any ambition to make 
all the world laugh. As Italian street 
singers their makeup and dressing are 
their only attempts at coined v. 

Charles l'rclle's dog act resembles Paul 
Sandor's, and has a rather stronger ac- 
cent on the ventriloquism phase. The 
dogs are exceedingly lifelike in their de 
portment and the act received the 
favorable reception it fully deserved. 

Rose Went worth'* London Hippodrome 
equestrian ad was rather more notice 
able for its trappings and equipment 
than for the novelty of its features. Miss 
Wentworth does nothing much out 
of the ordinary, but what she does is well 
done. Eihel A. McDonough and the Spis- 
sell Brothers and Mack complete the bill, 
with the exception of Walters and 
Sprouty and Aurie Dagwell, who will l>e 
found reviewed under the New Acts de- 
partment of Variety of this week. 



An act soon to be shown is called "The 
Onion Trust." The name need not neces- 
sarily be considered suggestive. 



in line with the curtailment policy now 
in vogue at the Hippodrome, the salarie- 
of the chorus, formerly $18 weekly, have 
been reduced to "$12 per." 



Cliffe Berzac will play Hammerstein's 
Roof this summer. 



John Hyams and Leila Melntyre have 
been booked solid by Myers & Keller 
from September 3, 1906, to May 12, 1907, 
most of the time having been placed over 
the Keith and Orpheum circuits. 



Manager W. B. Watson has signed con 
tracts for next season for the "Washington 
Society (lirls" with the following artists: 
The Four Lukens, also Crimmins and Gore, 
who are now touring Australia; "Carmen- 
cita" and the Esher Sisters. There will 
be thirty-five people in the organization, 
which will tour the Empire Circuit ex- 
clusively. 






VARIETY 



ii 



SUMMER PARKS 



K»l it or Variety: 

Sir Permit me to state through Variety 
that I am the originator of the "Train 
Wreckers and Robbers" as an open-air 

-.how performance, scenic production or 
spectacle. 
A detailed description was published 

Thursday, November 16, 1905. 

Aceor<ling to all reports, a direct theft 
Of my idea is now being perpetrated at 
Dreamland and Luna Park, Coney Island, 
N. Y. I have not authorized its production 
.it any park, resort or place. 

Further developments will prove my 
right to claim the conception of this at 
traction. 

Respectfully yours, 

Wm. Jenkins Hewitt. 



Felix Reich, who has lately formed a 
partnership with James E. Plunkett, for- 
merly with Myers & Keller, will book over 
a circuit of parks for this summer. Mr. 
Reich has always made a specialty of 
"dumb" acts, and will not alter that line, 
adding other departments, the vaudeville 
end of which Mr. Plunkett is especially 
familiar with. 



A theatre will occupy the "Fire and 
Flames" space at Dreamland, Ooney Island, 
this summer. Will Conklin will probably 
have the management of it. 



"Rump the Bumps" at the same place is 
another popular feature of the past 
which will be seen no more. Claude Hagen 
in conjunction with the Royce people will 
have a "balloon" in its place. The airship 
will be either anchored or constructed. 
Too much timidity on the part of the 
women prevented the "Rumps" from prov- 
ing a remunerative investment commen- 
surate with the space occupied. 

The representatives of Paragon Park at 
Xantasket Beach, near Boston, who were 
in the citv last week, have returned home, 
after securing a complete outfit for a 
"Fire and Flames" exhibition. Thompson 
& Dundy succeeded in unloading upon the 
Down Fast ers some three barrels of 
powder at one and one half cents a pound. 
The market price for this explosive in 
good condition is much higher, but if the 
powder purchased from the Luna Park 
holdover should turn out to be sea 
damp there is no one left to find fault 
with, both parties having considered the 
transaction a bargain at the time of sale. 

After all the talk and confusion over 
Jungle Park in Chicago, it is now defi- 
nitely asserted that while there will be 
nothing done for the coming summer, the 
park will open in ship- shape style for the 
season of '07. The financial dilemma has 
been smoothed over and sufficient capital 
solidly interested to place the under- 
taking upon a firm foundation without 
furl her annoyance. 



filwood Salsbury, manager of Luna 
Park at Cleveland, gives out the state 
merit that regardless of the weather con 
dit ions they intend opening May 15, A 
number of improvements have been made. 



.1. A. Miller has plans for a scenic rail- 
way, to cost not less than $40,000, and he 
will undoubtedly act his monev back the 
way things are shaping themselves out at 



Luna. Among the other added attrac- 
tions for the summer will Ik; "The Streets 
of India," over which John De Krako will 
reign supreme, and he heralds his coining 
with the announcement that he has en 
gaged "The Hindoos" to come direct from 
Paris here. Mi. Kiralfy will l>e direc- 
tor of the ballet. 



The Topeka (Kan.) Street Railroad Co. 
is making arrangements to open the sum- 
mer park, Vinewood, there and will soon 
have it in shape. Vaudeville bills will be 
given, a cozy theatre having been erected 
in the park for that purpose. 

At York, Pa., the street railway people 
have decided it would be foolish policy 
to run opposition to The Parlor, and will 
have a stock company instead of vaude- 
ville, as intended. 



It is stated that William A. Brady will 
have the Ringling circus as an attraction 
for eight weeks the coming season at his 
Rrighton Reach, X. Y., Park. 



Carsonia Park at Reading, Pa. (Geiger 
& Lauman, managers), will add to its at- 
tractions the circle swing, a miniature 
electric railway and a large dancing pa- 
vilion will be built, to be called the Ca- 
sino. The summer theatre will be man- 
aged by Bert R. Miller, and many im- 
provements will be made. 



Hanlan's Point, the leading summer 
amusement resort at Toronto, will have 
several new features the coming season. 
A new vaudeville theatre is being built 
and will be ready in time for the opening, 
Victoria Day, May 24. Other attractions 
are "Scenic River," "Figure 8," "Trip 
Around the World," miniature railway, 
pony circus and circle swing. The man- 
ager, L. Solomon, has other specialties in 
view. A fine fleet of steamers will run in 
connection with the Point. The Toronto 
Ferry Company are the owners. 

■ * 



Munro Park, at Toronto, will be closed 
bv the street railway which leased it 
on or about June 1. They are looking for 
another site. 



The "Luna Park" at Pittsburg, belong 
ing to the Ingersoll people, will be one 
of the finest equipped summer resorts in 
the country. Covering 32 acres of ground, 
there is sufficient space to allow full vent 
for every feasible venture. The "Flea 
Circus" will be given in the Smoky Town 
park this summer for the first time, 
after an absence of twenty years, and a 
new Hock of tleas is promised. Mar- 
tinique's Marionettes, appearing for the 
first time over here, have been booked as 
a permanent 'attraction through Charles 
Rornhaupt. The capitalization of the 
Pittsburg "Luna" is $500,000, fully paid 
in. ,' 



THE B0ST0CK LION TAMER. 

A French lion tamer and trainer, Gail- 
lard, has been engaged by Frank Rostock 
in lieu of Jack Ronavita for the coming 
season, and will appear at Dreamland, 
(Ymev Island, if Rostock shows there. 

Ronavita will have his own animal ex- 
hibition at the Sea Reach Palace on the 
Coney end of Rrooklyn. 



NEW THEATRE FOR SALEM. 

Lynn, Mass., March 9. 

It is understood that a new theatre is 
to be built in Salem on the site of the 
old Mechanics Hall, which was burned 
a little over a year ago. This theatre 
was conducted as a vaudeville house under 
the management, of James Moore. 

The present Salem ' Theatre ?s to be 
turned into a vaudeville house, while the 
new one will be devoted to repertoire and 
one night stands. Cahn & Grant have 
charge of the new project. 



SALVAGGI DEAD. 

Umberto Salvaggi died in Chicago Wed- 
nesday of heart trouble. He was born in 
Firenze, Italy, thirty-three years ago, and 
has been a dancer most of his life, hav- 
ing filled solo positions in London and 
elsewhere. He was for a time ballet mas- 
ter at the Royal Opera House, Prague, and 
left that position to enter vaudeville, 
forming an alliance with Orpheo under the 
title of the Quartet Orpheo-Salvaggi. Later 
he organized the Molasso-Salvaggis, play- 
ing an engagement here at the Koster & 
Rial house on Thirty-fourth street. After 
his split with Molasso he went to South 
Africa with his wife, but came back to 
this country last February, opening on the 
Proctor circuit before joining the Wallace 
shows. He was a member of (Jarihaldi 
Lodge of Masons in this city. 



FORD AND GEHRUE CLOSJe. 

"Lovers and Lunatics," the musical 
comedy in which John Ford and Mayme 
Gehrue are the stars in their first legiti- 
mate appearance in that capacity, will 
close to-night at the West End Theatre 
in Harlem, where it has played during 
this week. 

Ford and (Jehrue will return to vaude- 
ville for a time, again going out in the 
piece when it opens for next season on 
August 25. 

The Mittenthal Rrothers, who have 
backed the show, investing about $6,500, 
consider it a good piece of property. 



PLAYS "LITTLE PRINCESS." 

Mabel Taliafero will use as her vaude- 
ville vehicle the scene from the end of the 
second act of "The Little Princess," where 
the attie is transformed into a fairyland 
by the Indian servants. She will have 
the assistance of Louise Galloway and 
others of the original cast of the play. 



The Chas. K. Harris Courier 

Devoted to the interest* ot Soogt *nd Singtrt 
AtltliiAb all > t • ii i in it ii ii ., i inns to 
(HAS. K. DARIUS. 31 W. 31st St.. N. Y. 
I Meyer Cohen . M«r.)_ 

Vol. 1. New York. March 12. 1906. No. 4. 



To Hhow what the Trada 
think of a new koiik 
hy Chas. K. 1 1 hit is. it 
is only necessary to 
.state that when the 
title of his new song 
"THE BBLLBOFTHK 
HALL" wag mentioned 
iu the different trade 
papers published, Mr. 
Harris received hun- 
dreds of letters and 
telegrams for copies of 
same. Since the song 
has been on the mar- 
ket, since March 1st, 
the orders from all 
over the country have 
amounted, up to March 
seventh, to sixty 
seven thousand (87,- 
000) copies, which 
shows that those who 
handle music have con- 
fidence in a good thing. 

History again repeats it- 
self and this is vividly 
shown in the fact that 
Mr. JAMBS ALDBICH 
LIBBEY, who first in- 
troduced Chas. K. Har- 
ris' famous "After the 
Ball" in Hoyt's "Trip 
to Chinatown" Co. In 
1893. has lived to 
again "first introduce" 
Its worthy successor, 
"THil B ILLI OF 
TUB BALL." Mr. 
Libbey has this song 
now in his repertoire 
and says that without 
u doubt it will dupli- 



cate the s ii c c I » I 
he e r | a ted twelve 
years ag'» with the 
now world wide fa- 
mous ballad. As Mr. 
LlblM-y knows how to 
deliver a ballad be has 
had to respond to half 
a down encores at each 
performance he used 
the song, and the song 
shows Mr. Llbbey's 
m u r velous baritone 
voice to great advan- 
tage. 

STUART, the Male Pat- 
ti, at Hammersteln's 
this week is making u 
feature of "NOBODY 
BUT YOU." Fay Tem- 
pleton's great coon 
song. He also has In 
rehearsal the great bal- 
lad, "JUST ONE 
WORD OF CONSOLA- 
TION," which he will 
Introduce shortly as a 
soprano solo. 

AL MONROE, who is 
known as "Curly Mon- 
roe," Is making a fea- 
ture of "JUST ONE 
WORD OF CONSO- 
LATION" In Larry 
Ijawrence'a Big Act 
which opens at Kee- 
ney's Theatre next 
Monday. Mr. Monroe 
has a tenor voice of 
in a r vi- Ions sweetness 
and will be heard from 
very much in the near 
future. 



She will play only three weeks in 
vaudeville before sailing for Australia, 
these three weeks l>e ing given to the 
Proctor houses. 



A REGULAR CIRCUS. 

Dan Sherman will carry five acting peo- 
ple when he puts on "Old Dan Tucker" 
next season. He has already engaged a 
double somersault leaj>er, and will have 
besides a bucking mule, a genuine "rube"' 
and all of the other features of the old- 
timo wagon show. New scenery is al- 
ready on the frames. 



CRESSY'S NEXT SKETCH. 

The next new sketch Will M. Cressy 
and his wife. Blanche Dayne, will ap- 
pear in will be called "The Wyoming 
Whoop," and will be shown for the first 
time at Keith's Boston theatre October 1 
next. 



ALBANY PICKING UP. 

Business at Proctor's Theatre in Al- 
bany has picked tip remarkably during 
the past few weeks with no apparent 
icason for the sudden increase of interest. 



VARIETY THEATRES OF GREATER NEW YORK 

MANHATTAN. 

ATLANTIC GARDEN, Bowery Concert 8 P. M. 

ALHAMBRA, 7th Ave. and 12T>th St Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

CIRCLE, Broadway and 00th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M*. 

COLONIAL, Broadway and 03d St Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

DEWEY, 14th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M". 

FAMILY, East 12, r ith St Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

GOTHAM. Eant 125th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. It 

HURTIO & SEAMONS, West 125th St Vaudeville 2:30 and 8:30 P. M. 

HAMMERSTEIN'S, Times Sq Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

HUBER'S, 14th St Museum Continuous. 

HIPPODROME, 0th Ave. and 44th St Variety 2 and 8 P. M. 

KEITH'S, 14th St Vaudeville Continuous. 

LONDON. Bowery Burlesque 2 and 8 P. If. 

MINERS BOWERY. Bowery Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

MINER'S STB AVE., 8th Ave. and 27th St Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

PALACE, Amsterdam Ave Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

PASTOR'S, 14th St Vaudeville Continuous. 

PROCTOR'S 58TH STREET, 3d Ave and 58th 8t. Vaudeville 2:15 and 8:15 P. If, 

PROCTOR'S 23D STREET, West 23d St Vaudeville 2:15 and 8.15 P. M. 



BROOKLYN. 

AMPHION, Bedford Ave. Vuudeville 2.15 und 

ALCAZAR, Washington St Burlesque 2 and 8 

GAIETY, Broadway Burlesque 2 and 8 

OOTIIAM. EiiRt New York Vaudeville 2 and 8 

HYDE A MERMAN, Adams St Vaudeville 2 and 8 

IMPERIAL, Fulton St Vaudeville 2 and 8 

KEENEY'S. upper Fulton St Vaudeville 2 

NASSAU. Wllloughby St Burlesque 2 



15 and 

and 8 

.2 and 8 



NOVELTY, DriKKS Ave Vaudeville 

ORPHEUM, Fulton St Vaudeville 2:15 and 

STAR, Jay St Burlesque 2 and 8 

UNIQUE, Grand St Burlesque 2 and 8 



8:15 P. M. 
P. M". 
P. M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 
8:15 P. M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 

8:15 P. M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 



ia 



VARIETY 



CORRESPONDENCE 



BOHEMIANS IN NEVADA. 

We passed the frisky stage and left the Golden 
Gate City and were prospecting In the mining 
towns of Nevada for three days. We played Car- 
son City, Virginia City and Reno. In Curson I 
went to the grounds where Fitz and Corbett ham- 
mered each other, and I almost believe I saw 
some of the blood Corbett shed. 

The Nevada citizens are a peaceable lot and I 
was quite surprised at the good behavior of the 
Indian Inhabitants. In looking over the "society 
column" of the Reno Gazette I notice that an 
Indian merchant was found dead In his camp 
with his squaw beside him, both legs amputated, 
and two beheaded papooses lying almost on top of 
the demised parents. Otherwise things' are quiet 
among the "four hundred" out here and all are 
resting peacefully, thank you. 

On my arrival In one of the towns I asked the 
manager, "When do you have an orchestra re- 
hearsal?" He replied, "Two o'clock If it rains 
and B o'clock If It doesn't." I asked, "How Is 
that?" He answered. "Well, the leader of the 
orchestry drives a hack, and if it rains he quits 
work at 2." This Is on the level. 

Now For the Mormon Town. 

Here we are this week mixed up with Rrlgham 
Young's followers. Salt Lake City Is doing so 
well from a theatrical standpoint that It Is really 
difficult to say anything against It. It is a great 
town, and If we were not filled up at present our 
chorus could be greatly enlarged as there are a 
bunch of disgruntled husbands open for bids for 
the disposal of their many wives. I met one man 
who has four of them and thirty-two children. 
If it weren't for the large railroad fares I would 
engage the whole collection and carry them along 
as a "special attraction." The wives are experi- 
enced Jugglers, hand balancers, fencing artists and 
plate throwers, while the kids sing In all keys and 
at all hours of the day and night. I am Just be- 
ginning to realize that Solomon was a "wise guy." 
It's too bad Rip Van Winkle wasted so much time 
sleeping, with this Mormon town anxiously looking 
for him and others of his kind. 

Well, there are a lot of good fellows here in 
town, one of whom ia an old Brooklynlte, Billy 
Gulney, who Is treasurer of the Lyric Theatre 
here. Billy is very much the candy boy here and 
has some big things up his sleeve. Billy used to 
count the money at the Alcazar Theatre in Brook- 
lyn, from which position he resigned about four 
months ago. Billy has fallen right in line. He 
says Mormonlsm Is a great thing but he has been 
too busy to give It serious consideration. He 
sends regards to all his Eastern friends. Mgr. 
Moss of the Lyric is seriously ill, and In his ab- 
sence Billy is the "Big Pill." 

R. A. Grant, one of the big fellows connected 
with the Lyric Theatre here, Is not related to the 
famous Ulysses S., but Is a ringer for that brave 
man. Grant of Salt Lake fame is a fearless man 
but has not had the nerve to follow in the steps 
of bis Mormon constituents. He may outgrow bis 
present failure, though; you never can tell. All 
the managers who played the Lyric this season 
refer to Grant as the "white haired boy." and 
that may account for him waving the white flag 
so often. 

The Bohemians were voted the real thing In 
the laughing and singing line and our business up- 
holds the opinions expressed. We are nearlng the 
record of the season, our business having Increased 
with each performance. We have been so busy 
making them laugh that really the outside world 
has been neglected and the knowledge of our tri- 
umphs has been withheld until our return to the 
East. This is one show that has not been "kill- 
ing" the audiences, for It would cost money to 
bury them, so we are contented with being the 
acknowledged laughing show of the season. Next 
report from the front will hall from Denver. "Re- 
member me to Broadway!" Gee, it's great to be 
crazy! So long. THE BIO SCREAM. 

PITTSBURG, FA. 
GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— High class 
music by the Fadettes Orchestra Is the topllner 
for this week, and this excellent band of women 
musicians are favorites here. While their work 
appeals to the cultured musician there is much 
to take the popular fancy, particularly their imi- 
tations of the circus band with all the accom- 
paniments of the ring, even to the ubiquitous 
barker. Pat Rooney and Marlon Bent have 
a clever skit. Miss Bent was good In her piano 
work and their eccentric team dancing cannot 
be excelled In the business. r Nina Morris and 
company present "A Friend's Advice." a little 
farce which rati rangpealc from dramatic Intensity 
to broad burlesque?*" Ashley Miller and Ethel 
Browning, formerly of the Davis Stock Company, 
presented a miniature comedy entitled "Caught," 
which pleased. Julius Tannen returns to vaude- 
ville with a line of new Imitations of De Wolf 
Hopper. Raymond Hitebcoek. George Cohan, Dave 
Warfleld and others, and makes a big hit. Linden 
Beckwlth is dainty and original in "The Singing 
Portrait." Avery and Hart started In to make 
us forget Williams and Walker. Carlln and Otto 
are clever .German comedians. One of the novel 
acts of the season .Is Coin's Pantomimic Dogs, 
who do their turn in a miniature dog village. 
Tom Moore pleases In coon songs. Peters and 
Green, late with musical comedy. Victor, billed 
as "the most perfeet man." shows fine muscular 
development, and the moving pictures finish a 

bill in which there are no dull features. OAY- 

ETY (James E. Orr. mgr). — Waldron's Trocadero 
Burlesquers were greeted with large and apprecia- 
tive houses. The opening piece. "The Misfit Fam- 
ily," is really a musical comedy with well de- 
veloped situations which set the audience In high 
good humor. Frank Graham as an irritable old 
man. Charles Belmont as bis nephew, Jack Boyce, 
Pearl Stevens and Mae Taylor were clever. The 
musical selections were excellent and enough 
horseplay was given at the Hotel Astorbllt' to 
please that portion of the audience who demand 
strenuousness In their amusements. Hits Iti the 
olio were feats of strength by Brlnn of London, 
who does some great balancing and lifting feats. 
The Alpine Family of English acrobats were en- 
tertaining: Mackle and Walter present a good 
sketch and Mae Taylor sings up-to-date songs. 



The costumes are fresh and stunning. ACAD- 
EMY (H. W. Williams. Jr.).— Frank B. Carr's 
Thoroughbreds opened yesterday to standing room. 
A bright musical melange entitled "A Good Run 
for Your Money" opens the show and is funny 
throughout. There Is a crowd of pretty, lively 
girls, up-to-date Jokes and creditable singing. 
The closing skit, "A Union Man," Is Also com- 
ical and entertaining. The olio is strong. The 
Laurent Trio, European novelty artists, give one 
of the best acta seen here tbia season. Henry 
and Francis in a one act comedy "The New Jani- 
tor," created many laughs. Charlea Douglass, 
the well known comedian, was warmly received. 
Orietta and Taylor In an operatic sketch "Looking 
for Miss Fortune" were splendid. Mile. La Toska 
proved to be a clever contortionist. Nlblo and 
Riley as "The Wood Dealer and the Kid" made 
one of the best features of the olio, and Willie 
Weston won much applause with his imitations. 

NOTE.— Hugh J. Ward and Eva Taylor, both 

Pittsburg favorites, having been leading members 
of the old Davis Stock Company, are rehearsing 
the playlet they present at the Grand next week, 
which will be Koslna Yokes' famous sketch "The 
Circus Rider." MADAME PITT. 



ST. LOUIS. MO. 
COLUMBIA (Frank Tate, mgr.).— Edwards, Da- 
vis and company and Charley Case beaded an 
array of talent which proved highly edifying to 
the clientele. The remainder of the bill was made 
up by the following artists: Georgia Lewis, limes 
and Ryan, Luce and Luce, Alice Lyndon Doll, 
the Doris Trio, Probst, Vernon. Horsky. Berger 

and company, and Dixon and Auger. GAYETY 

(O. T. Crawford, mgr.). — As many people as strict 
observance of the fire regulations would permit 
witnessed "Wine, Woman and Song" tbia week. 
The show is one of the sort that St. Loulsans like 
and appreciate. "A Day at Niagara Falls'* served 
to Introduce everybody in the first part. In it 
Sam Howe displayed some originality as a writer 
of burlettas. The olio was comprised of Ray- 
mond and Clayton, sketch artists; Frederick Broth- 
ers and Burns, musical performers; Bonlta, coon 
singer, and Howe and Scott. The latter team 
made a big hit in their "Ylddisher" work. Ray- 
mond and Clayton make a mistake by laughing at 
their own offerings and trying to get personal with 
the audience. Bonlta pleased with her singing. 
Her three coon assistants are as big as she is, 
but have very good voices. In the burlesque, 
"Fun in the Subway," Sam Howe, Charles Ray- 
mond, Samuel Llebert, Marie Lamour, Jessie 
Burns, Gloria Fuller and Elly Menslng were very 

good. STANDARD (Leo Relcbenbach. mgr.). — 

The Alcazar Beauties proved a drawing attraction. 
In the olio Harry and Julia Seers introduced "The 
Census Taker," a very laughable skit. Saw telle 
and Sears, Haight and Dean, James B. Carson 
and the Three Keeley Brothers did good stunts. 
Cunning, the Jail breaker, as an added feature, 

more than made good. NOTES. — Edward Car- 

ruthera of the Western Vaudeville Managers' As- 
sociation was a St. Louis visitor this week. J. 
Parry, traveling manager of the Interstate circuit, 
last week married Zoa Matthews, the singer of 
coon songs. "Me, Him and I" broke the house 
record at the Grand this week, according to Man- 
ager Cohan of Hurfig & Senmon's forces. 

JOE PAZEN. 



CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

KEITHS (H. A. Daniels, mgr.).— Week of 6 
has a good and entertaining bill. Harry Tate's 
company in a farcical sketch called "Motoring" 
is easily the laughing hit of the bill. The Three 
Madcaps open and are very good. Kita Banzai 
Troupe of Japanese Jugglers is the best act of its 
kind seen here. W. J. McDermott, monologist, 
is fair. Alice Pierce in her impressions of great 
actresses succeeds admiringly in winning the audi- 
ence. Zazell and Vernon, acrobatic pantomime, 
food. Emmet Devoy and company in sketch, "The 
Saintly Mr. Billings," are very funny. The Three 
Funny Mitchells, colored singers and dancers, are 
not so funny as they are good in straight stuff, 

LYRIC (E. R. Lang, mgr.). — Herman Weedon 

with six lions heads the bill here. Mr. and Mrs. 
Danny Mann have a very pretty sketch. "Mandy 
Hawkins." The Faust Family, acrobats, fair. 
Wills and Barron, comedians, good. Anna Gilch, 
a Cleveland girl, sings well and pleases. Fred C. 

Styles, vocalist, a steady attraction. EMPIRE 

(Charles W. Denzlnger, mgr.). — The European 
Burlesquers, presenting two good burlesques en- 
titled "Schultz's Hotel" and "A Souvenir," with 
a good olio consisting of Snitz Moore, Harry Har- 
vey and Heloise Horton in "A Trip to the Races," 
Bruce and Dagneau In a skit they call "The Red 
Feather Girls," LaBelle Marie, billed as the most 
beautifully formed woman In the world; Tom Mor- 
rlsey and Anna Rich, "Bargain Day in Vaude- 
ville," and the Yapasuma Troupe of Royal Japs, 
Jugglers and conjurors. C. S. B. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— -Bill for 
March 5 strikes the popular chord. Seventeen Pe- 
kin Zouaves form the headline and were well re- 
ceived. Le Brun's Grand Opera Trio rendered "II 
Trovatnre" and other selections with much feel- 
ing. Musical Klelsf scored. Mizrl von Wenzl 
sang. A season with "Beauty and the Beast" 
has not caused Harry Let 'lair to alter his old 
act. Bryan and Nadine are gymnasts of ability. 
Valerie Bergere and company for their second week 
offered "Ills Japanese Wife." Pictures showed 
the "Escape from Sing Sing." Business is big. 
Bert Conte and company top the bill for week 12. 
— GREENWALL (Henry Greenwall. mgr.).— 
Capacity houses greeted Thelse's Casino Girls at 
both performances March 4. They offer a bur- 
letta In two parts entitled "An Unwilling King." 
Lew Hearn was good as the German pickle dealer, 
while Miss Dale Wilson sang In good voice and 
distributed her photos to the audience. The olio 
contains Allen Coogan, who should drop his sing- 
ing and do a straight dancing act. Belle Gordon 
has a bag punching act with which she can work 
the best vaudeville houses. The Fern Comedy 
Four were fair. Hal Godfrey Is adopting some 
of the methods of George Felix. His "Very Bad 
Boy" caught the house. Sorlbner's Gay Mas- 
queraders for week 11. O. M. SAMUEL. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— The Or- 
pheum Road Show's engagement, which broke all 
house 'ecords by a good fat margin last week, is 
followed this week by a bill of the Orphcuin's 
standard although not anything al>ove tliut. The 
week Is unusually Interesting because of what Is 
practically the rlrKt appearance In this country for 
iminy years of Howard Brothers, the English sec- 
ond sight ond thought transference demonstrators. 
Tin y have the people guessing both, during ami 
after the performance. Snyder and Buckley, Im- 
mense Sunday bit. Julie Ring antl company, first 
time here, presenting "A Quiet Life," with the 
necessary assistance of G. Roland Sargeant. Lea 
Rruniu, odd and very catchy billiard table act. 
Jimmy Wall makes good as heavily as any black- 
face act since Charley Case. Artie Hall again a 
big favorite with her "Genuine Georgia Girl" busi- 
ness. Carlisle and Baker, colored musicians, sec- 
ond edition, of Cole and Johnson, and very good. 
The usual Sunday opening to turnuway business. 

CHAPIN. 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (Shafer Ziegler, mgr.) 
— The bill for the week of March 5 was thor- 
oughly entertaining. It contained no features of 
exceptional importance, but afforded good amuse- 
ment from beginning to end. Fanny Rice, always 
a favorite In Indianapolis, was the headllner, and 
repeated her success of other seasons, her work 
being as artistic as of yore. Charles R. Sweet, 
who had not played an engagement In this city in 
several years, scored with Ids old "Musical Bur- 
glar" act. He Is such a clever comedian that one 
wonders why he does not become more ambitious 
and introduce new material. The Esmeralda Sis- 
ters and their Four Flower Girls offered a neat 
dancing act. but their singing was weak. These 
girls are pretty, and there Is a certain attractive- 
ness about their act, but they would obtain better 
results if they had a good stage manager to put 
on their act in the proper style. It is crude at 
present, with an atmosphere that Is decidedly ama- 
teurish. Keno, Walsh and Melrose gave an ex- 
cellent acrobatic exhibition, and the other contrib- 
utors to the bill were James F. Macdonald, the 
singer and raconteur; Clifford and Burke, the min- 
strel comedians, and Adair and Dahn In a good 
tightwlre specialty. Next week Edwin Stevens 
will head the bill. He is well known and well 
liked here. Business continues good at the Grand. 
The nppntng of the I/cnten season caused a drop- 
ping off !n attendance at first, but the good shows 
are drawing the people again. 

LOUIS WESLYN. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

COLUMBIA (M. C. Anderson, mgr.).— The bill 
this week Is up to the standard, the only feature 
rendering the program out of the ordinary' being 
two Juggling turns. Both are great hits. The 
real bit of the bill was Fred Hallen In his song 
and dance, "Stars of Other Days." George Fredo 
and Hairy Dare opened the performance In a 
musical act entitled. "Are You Angry, Albert?" 
which pleased. Harry M. Brown. Sam Brown and 
Viola Harris in a sk«tch, "Just to Laugh," made 
a great Lit. Fred Hallen and Molly Fuller. In "A 
Morning Plunge." did some clever acting ami 
made a pro n o u nced hit. Delmore Sisters, musical 
artists, were good. Bailey and Austin, musical 
comiques and acrobats, big bit. The Plroscofils, 
jugglers, big bit. Sidney Grant, monologue, hit. 
Agonal Family. Jugglers. In "A Lively Supper at. 
Maxim's," big bit. Next week. Fanny Rice. Es- 
meralda Sisters, Four Marnos, Klne and Gottbold. 
Charles R. Sweet, Adair and Dahn, Clifford an 1 

Burke and James F. Macdonald. STANDARD 

(Charles B. Arnold, mgr.). — Rice and Barton's Big 
Extravaganza Company. The performance began 
with the burlesque. "A Night In Coney Island," 
which was good. In the cast were Charles Barton, 
Hert Baker. George H. Nolan. D. L. McGrath, 
Tom Archibald, John Lemuels, Will Monahnn. 
Annie Dunn Mullen, Bertha A. Hollenbec. Clara 
Seymour, Fannie Vedder. Kittle Hart and Tesslo 
Burns. In the olio Bert Baker, in Irish songs, was 
a big hit. Bertha A. Hollenbec, in songs, hit. 
Lemuels. Monahnn and Nolan, In minstrelsy, old 
and new. big hit. Goldsmith and Hoppe, musical 
artists and xylophone experts, big hit. Renzetta 
and La Hue, acrobats, hit. Next week, Trocadero 
Burlesque!* with the Great Brlnn as a special 

feature. PEOPLE'S (.las. E. Fennessy, mgr.). 

The Jolly (Jlrls Extra? agansa Company In a 
burlesque entitled "An Honest Politician," with 
George T. Davis, Sam Sldman, John Bragg. James 
Conners, George LefTel. Etta Ashton. Llllle Stevens. 
Mav Melville, May Irish, Marie' Herr, Florence 
Gordon. Florence Tyler. Bessie Stieger. Edith 
Adams, Jessie Couriers, Viola Clayton. Estell Slbert. 
Marlon Hayes, Daisy Greene, May Howard and 
Alice Northrope. was very poor. In the olio Gordon 
and Hayes, fair: the Radium Girls, poor; Melville 
and Monford. hit; the Leffel Trio, rebounding 
trampoline bar act, big hit; George T. Davis, illus- 
trated songs, food; Wlneherman's troupe of trained 
bears and monkeys, added feature, hit. Next 
week, The Innocent Maids, T. W. DInkins, man- 
ager, and James Walt hour and company as an ex- 
tra added feature. if, HESS. 



ATLANTA, OA. 

STAR (J. B. Thompson, mgr.).— Week of B 
opened up to crowded houses, and patrons wit- 
nessed the following bill: Mae Kenna. songstress, 
fair; Rogers and Lavlgne, comedy sketch, get the 
applause but need new material; Golden and Col- 
lins. Golden, only appeared; Marty ne Sisters, nov- 
elty dancers, good; Miss Vassle McAllister, serio- 
comic, clever; Frier Sisters, all to the good, prov- 
ing the hit of the bill; concluding with new pic- 
tures and the comedy burlesque "A Live Subject," 

by W. H. Trueheart and stock company. 

AUDITORIUM (J. P. Anderson, mgr.) .—Four Tag- 
garts, special attraction last week, proved n suc- 
cess. Sarah Bernha-f<!t plays at this house 17 and 
the advance sale has opened up big. BRIX. 



Cobb's Corner 



No. a. A Weekly Word With WILL the Wordwright- 



How to become your own music publisher. 

PERFORMERS AND OTHERS WHO WRITE 

SONGS: 

Your name on a published song Is a better 

advertisement than a thousand three-sheets. 

Send me your song and photograph and I 
will have the song copyrighted, arranged for 
the piano, and print for you in elegant style 
in flue paper with colored and engraved title 
page, containing a half-tone photo-cut of 
yourself with your name, equal in appear- 
ance to any popular song published; and de- 
liver to you, ready to be retailed at the 
regular rate of $.50 per copy — 

250 copies for $18.00 

500 '• H 25.00 

1.000 . " " 35.00 

WILL D. COBB 

151a Broadway New York 

Author of "Good-bye, Little Girl, Good- 
bye," "Good-bye, Dollle Gray," "Could You 
Be True to Eyes of Blue?" etc., etc. 

Reference, any music publisher In the world. 



Big houses all week and a very good show. 

ORPHEUM (Jules F. Bistes, local mgr.).— Week 
Feb. 20: The bill this week was not the best we 
have seen, but contained some good points. The 
Dionne Twins with their mandolins and sweet, 
refined faces, delighted many; Fred and Annie 
Pelot as comedy Jugglers are not a great success; 
Bonnie Gaylor, the girl from Posey County, was 
encored when she sang '"Silver Heels," and was 
very fair In her other turn; Thomas J. Keogh and 
company In "The Way He Won Her," was very 
food in the characters of Julius Plcklemelgb anil 
Billy Nolan; The Lepage* in their Jumping nov- 
elty were the bit of the week; The Fernande May 
Trio were fair, and the Klnodrome proved as popu- 
lar as ever. Good sized audiences all week. 

LYRIC. -Week Feb. 24: Tom Miner's Bohemian 
Burlesquers in a "Bohemian Beauty" presented a 
very fair bill. The olio comprised Will H. Ward, 
Charles King and Grace Tremont; All, Hunter and 
All; Ida Nlcolal and the Orpheuin Trio; and Wil- 
son, one of the best trick cyclists seen here. 

Good business. NOTE. — W. S. Moss, manager 

of the Lyric, died here February 28 of ptomaine 
poisoning. Funeral services were held here March 
4, and the remains were shipped to Portland for 
Interment. JAY E. JOHNSON. 



UTICA, N. Y. 

ORPHEUM (E. L. Koneke, res. mgr.).— Head- 
ing the bill week of March 5 Is Mayme Reming- 
ton and her Buster Brownies. Scored a big hit. 
The act is pretty and full of life. H. W. TreDen- 
ike and Tekla Farm, late of the Schumauu-Heink 
company, have a most artistic musical act culled 
"The Pearl and the I»bster." Miss Farm Is an 
exceptionally tine singer as is Mr. TreDenike a 
good comedian; The Chinaman and the Soubrette, 
O. G. Seymour and Miss Dupree, proved highly 
pleasing; Joseph Reichen's dogs are not many but 
they are the greatest of their kind seen here; 
Torbay had the audience in laughter all through 
his act, which consists of clever con<»dy silhouette 
work; Hoey and I>ee. Hebrew parodists, w lib all new 
parodies, went big; Fred J. I la mill and Suzanne 
Hatpin reviewed under New Acts. Pictures close. 

AMERICAN (II. S. Hall, lessee and mgr.).— 

Bill week Starch 5 Includes Al Derby, bag puncher, 
good; The Vardes. a colored team of singers and 
dancers, good; William Delano, acrobatics and Jug- 
gling, fair; Bowen and Neville, conversational 
comedians, fair; there are a few clever points In 
the monologue of Raymond Merrltt; "Irish Politi- 
cians," a skit by A. G. and Mazle B. Belford. 
fulr; pictures conclude show. SETAB. 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

BON TON (J. H. Young, mgr.).— Week Feb. M: 
Slg. Ernl, the one-legged skater, did some clever 
work: Ben llunn In song and dance was the hit 
of the week; The Heazllt Trio made good; Mile. 
Brachard In ball balancing and juggling was a 
strong attroctlon and Klnetoscope pleased as usual. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

SEATTLE (John Cort, mgr.).— Imperial Burles- 
quers opened week 2."» to capacity. They have a 
good show in three acts entitled "An Eye Opener." 
The olio Is worked In through the throe acts, 
which makes It more like a farce comedy than a 
burlesque. Pauline Moran with her Bungalow 
Babes does a very clever act; Crawford and Man- 
ning, comedy eccentrlques, are doing the same old 
turn they have done for ten years, but nevertheless 
go very good. The Clipper Comedy Four do a very 
good singing act but spring too much bum comedy. 
Business has been only fair. Next week. Camp- 
bell & Drew's Avenue Girls. STAR (Melvln O. 

Wlnstock, mgr.).— Dick and Ettie Guise, blackface 
sketch, "A Financial Embarrassment," Miss 
Gnlse making some very quick change work 
which Is good; Peter Dunsworth. song Illustrator; 
Jessikal, the Kentucky Isdle; The Zeraldas, up- 
side down equilibrists, clever turn; Broderlck, the 
tall pine tattler. The big feature of the bill this 
week Is Princess Trlx, the human horse, a $•"<*» 

act. Starnscope. ORPHEUM' (E. J. Donnelan, 

mgr.). — Kclloy and Gibson, society sketch; War- 
ren II. .Stetson, baritone; Viola Cottan, mind 
reading; Allman Ellsworth, singing and dancing 
sketch; Montelll and Clifford, acrobats; Varden, 
Pcrrv and Wilbur, musical trio; Orpheuniscope. 

PANTAGES' (Alex Pantages. mgr.).— Dave 

Barton, singing and dancing comedian; Leslie and 
Barry, comedy sketch, "A Female Doctor"; Ar- 
thur Ewall. Illustrated songs; The Three DeVHIos. 
bouncing wheel act; Fred Stansflcld. character 
sketch: Gilbert Barony* and company, travesty on 
'•('nmllle." which Is good; Pantagescope. CEN- 
TRAL (Mr. Shannon, mgr.).— DeVoe and DeVoe, 
band bouncers; Sam Cohen, Hebrew comedian; 
Lehl and Cecil, singing and dancing sketch: Frank 
Smith, ballads; return of Sadie Hlte, Illustrated 
songs; moving pictures. GEE GEE BEE. 

LANCASTER, PA. ■ 

NEW FAMILY (Edward Mozart, mgr.)!— Bill » 
week March 5 headed by Doherty's Poodles; dupli- 
cated former success and prove big favorites with 



VARIETY 



13 



the ladies and children. The Three Graces, a 
Funny Kid, a Big Man and a Little Woman, make 
the combination and created plenty of fun. Cherry 
and Batea, America's Wizards of the Wheel, good. 
Will Palean, ventriloquist, fair. The Ader Trio, 
dub jugglers, have an act which contulns much 
that is novel. An exceptionally clever team of 
colored performers is offered in D's mid D's. The 
kinetogrnph concludes. Big business prevails. 



over will fill an engagement on the Kohl & Castle 
circuit. ROBERT L. ODELL. 



NOTE.— Week Match 12 will be the closing 

week at the Bijou, the result of very poor busi- 
ness. MACK. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

POM'S (J. II. Docking, uigr.).— Bill week 
March 5 included Virginia Karl and Six Johnnies, 
big hit; Frank Owen and company in new sketch 
"The Benediction," scored big; The Nevurros, 
hund balancers; Herald Square Four, comedy sing- 
ing; Joealea Trio, Newell end Niblo, Cartmells, 
.111.1 eleetrograph. Coming, 12: llnl Davis and 
Inez MacCauley In Pals." W. J. F. 



ALBANY, N. T. • 

PROCTOR'S (Howard Graham; re*, mgr.).— 
Week of 5: Fred Walton and his London players 
carry off tirst honors with the novel pantomime, 
"Cisale's Dream." Mary Norman, who deftly 
takes off the fads of Iter Hex, is a close second. 
Miss May Boley, erstwhile Htar of '"The Maid and 
the Mummy" company, with her original "Polly 
Girls," furnishes u half hour of enjoyment. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Fitzsimmous in their lovcmaklng 
sketch, "A Fight for Love," well received. In 
fact there is not a mediocre turn in the entire 
bill, which includes Kmersoii and Omega, In a 
funny sketch; Frank Lynne. English coster singer 
and humorist, and Eddie Mack, novelty dancer. 
It fs easily the best bill that has been presented 
to Albany audiences this season, s. It. O. busi- 
ness. Coming, week of 12: Josephine Cohan and 
Company, Kelley and Violette, Celine Bobe, Ollle 
Young and Brother, Fred Niblo, Ben Meyer, Mattle 
Keene and Company, and Otis Edwards' School 
Boys and Girls. M ARTEL. 

SCHENECTADY, N. Y. 

MOHAWK (Jos. Weber, re*, mgr.).- Week of .": 
Elluore Sisters, comediennes, made a hit; Told 11 
Sisters, musical experts, g«»od; Donovan. Arnold 
and Company, in "20 Minutes on Broadway," fair- 
ly well received; Hacker Lester Trio, head to head 
balancers on wheels, excellent ; The Swlekards, 
singing novelty, were fair; Scott and Johnson. 
singing and dancing comedians, well received; 8 
Bristol Ponies are an excellent amusement for the 
young folks. Closed with good motion pictures. 
Excellent business. Coming, week of 12: The 
Great Valdare Troupe, Watermelon Trust, and 
others. MAUTKL. 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 

DOCKS TADER'S G A BRICK (W. L. Doekstader. 
mgr.). — Opened to good business week of 5. with 
Morton, Temple and Morton, dancing and singing 
act; Potter and Hart well, sensational head bal- 
ancers, very strong act and warmly received; Lis* 
7.1c Daly, new set, dancing and moving pictures. 
"Dancing, Past and Present," very got*! and Well 
received; George Ihivls , monologlst, good; Hut 1 ' 
Stanton and Florence "MoaeUs, "For Reform." 
beautifully presented nnd a hit; The Five Nosses, 
a tine act which had several recalls; Lillian Tyce 
and Irene Jermou, a real Irish girl and dainty 
singing comedienne; Howard's comedy ponies nnd 
dogs, well received. Next week: Mr. and Mrs. 
Jimmy Barry, Hlnes and Remington, Orvllle and 
Frank. Babel Johnson and Katherlne Hayes, The 
LuMays Brothers, Halley and Meehan. The Four 
Shannons, and a big novelty not yet mentioned. 

PITRO. 



TROY, N. Y. 
PROCTOR'S (W. II. Graham, res. mgr.).— A 
good bill was presented this week. Bsdbs made 
a hit in her novelty dances; GcOTflsna Clark In 
Scotch ballads was well received; Rice and Pre- 
VOSt provoke the audience to roars of laughter; 
Celins Bobe. violinist and xylopbonlst, took well; 

The Canaille Trio, horizontal bar performers, do 
some greet stunts; Tanner and GlllK»rt, eccentric 
comedy pair, very funny; George W. Day, mono- 
logue comedian, keeps the audience in good humor; 
»;us Edwards' Schoolboys and Girls appear In a 
mirthful singing end dancing specialty; the popu- 
lar motion pictures round up the bill. ROYAL 

(W. H. Buck. res. mgr.).— 'Hie High Rollers 
opened to fair houses in two funny burlesques 
and a clever olio. Week of 12: "Black Crook, 
Jr." J. J. M. 



MONTREAL, CAN. 

ROYAL (Harry C. Egerton, mgr.). Week March 
5: Brigadier's Extravaganza Company Opened to 
big business. Oood show; everybody works. Kd- 
mond Hayes, "The Wise Guy," was enthusiastic- 
ally received for his clever work; The Three 
Kuhns, singers and instrumentalists, made a hit 
with one of the best musical and singing turns 
seen here this season; The Prentice Troupe, In 
comedy acrobatic work, were heartily applauded; 
Andy McClond. the Irish Minstrel, has a turn flt 
talking and singing. Ills "pocket musical act" 
was good and he made a hit. LeSter and Moure 
made n hit with singing and dancing. Song 
"Strict Q T." by Blanch Bttford and < horns was 
the hit. Next week: Whalen and Mart ell' a Ken- 
tucky Belles. MONUMBNT NATIONAL.— Next 

week: Moving pictures and Illustrated songs. 

AL. II. PRENTISS. 



EVAN8VILLE. IND. 

BIJOU (George Bellinger, mgr.).- -Bill 
Is proving a great hit. There are two 
acts. Marco Twins in a comedy sketch 
"Babes In the Woods" were a success. 
the other feature hit, made good in his 



week 4 

feature 

entitled 

Powell. 

Illusions 



and conjuring. Noblette ami Marshall, comedy 
sketch, were but fairly well received. Pero and 
Wilson, clown ami eoubrctte, took well although 
their not Is rather weak. Jimmy Lucas, comedy 
song and dance, was poor. Leonora Roliertson. 
songs, received n hearty welcome which she de- 
served. Moving pictures good. NOTE. — Oren 

II. Swatts, buck and wing dancer, professionally 
known us a. .member of the team of Lyne and Ken- 
nedy, Is In the city spending a few weeks' vaca- 
tion with his relatives. He has lieen playing on 
the Orpheum circuit and when hla vacation la 



ERIE, PA. 

PARK (M. Reis, mgr.).— Another strong bill 
drew big attenduuee week March 5. Annie Ab- 
bott, the Georgia magnet, was the headline feature 
and her work was as mystifying as of yore; Sears 
with his illusion "Agu" cased much comment; 
the Col tons, a Bong and dance turn, good; the 
Esher Sisters were clever danceis; Harry llalman 
with his songs and stories had the audience with 
him. Tommy Burnett sang us sweetly as ever 
and the Parkoscope concluded an excellent per- 
formance. NOTE. — The Rolloway, a new skat- 
ing rink, was opened 5 and Is drawing big crowds. 

L. T. BERLINER. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

ORPIIEI'M (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Week of 
4 saw excellent bill and good business with Bert 
Coote and company In comedy sketch "A Lamb on 
Well Street" us headliner. This sketch is a good 
laugh provoker and evinces considerable merit, 
(ioolinau's dogs share hotiors and please the audi- 
ence; Lambert and Pier, blackface «.omcdluns, sing 
and have some new Jokes to tell; The Amoros Sis- 
ters, jugglers and trapezists, do very well; Rice 
und Cady, German comedians, make good; the 
Colby Family have a well rendered musical act; 

Wilson and Heloise have a novel acrobatic act. 

CENTCRY (Joseph Barrett, mgr.).— W. B. Wat- 
son's Burlesquers did good business week 4 In two 
very clever burlettas, "Miss Clover" and "A Bash- 
fid* Venus," which are aliove the average. W. B. 
Watson has the leading parts, olio has but three 
numbers yet each is excellent. Vomamoto Broth- 
ers, Japanese wire and perch artists. Bijou Mlg- 
non and Madge Riugle sing and dance, and Swan 
and Bambard are acrobats. The chorus Is well 
gowned, well trained and fair to look upon. Week 

11: The American Burlesquers. MAJESTIC 

(Fred Waldmann, mgr.). — Roble's Knickerbocker 
Burlesquers was the attraction week 4. Good 
business the rule. olio Includes Mr. and Mrs. 
Larry Shaw who sing and dance, Christy and Wil- 
lis who Juggle things, Lewis and Green who sing 
and talk, and Lea LsroSeS who do some remark- 
able feats on the slack wire. The second part is 
called 'The Wrong Mr. Corbett." Week 11: 

Manchester's Crackerjacks. YALE (Lloyd 

Brown, mgr.). — Polite vaudeville with good busi- 
ness week 1. with Hart ami Dillon, singers; Gll- 
more and Carroll. little West Symonda, Spedden 
and Paige, and Harold Gould. NATIONAL (Dr. 

F. L. Flanders, mgr.). Week 1: Good business 
with M'lle Aunssla Scott; Fred K. Woodron, bari- 
tone. Bison City Trio; Gladys, the singing and 
dancing aoubrette; Harry C. Hunt, the phonograph 
man. FAIRPLAY. 

TRENTON, N. J. 
TRENT (Edward Benton, .mgr.).— Week of 
March 5, good, Mullen and Corrella, comedy acro- 
bats; Ed Blondcll and company In "The Lost 
Boy," scored heavily; George Wilson, "That's 
all"; Ethel Robinson, singing and Impersonations; 
Alhamhra Sextette, late of Lew Fields' company, 
musical and dancing act. gotMl; Archie Boyd and 
company in a sketch "After Many Years," re- 
ceived well; Ned Nye and his Rollicking Girls, in- 
cluding Reid Sisters, acrobatic dancers, pleased. 
The show concluded with the blograph. Next 
week's bill Includes Edward Clark and his Six 
Winning Widows, Mason and Kelly, Wireless 
Telegraphy, Harry Corson Clarke, Daisy Harcourt, 
Meeker Baker Trio, Major Doyle and the blograph. 
Business good. 1L B. H« 

HAMILTON, OHIO. 

(iRAND (McCarthy and Ward, ingra.). -Week 
March B, Charles and Ethel Perry In sketch. "What 
It 'TIS," fair; San ford and Darlington, "Twenty 
Minutes in Vaudeville." good: the Kronas. "The 
Dude of the Milage." good; Arthur Boralla. 
musical mimic, a hit; Harry lb»dgln. in illustrated 
songs, and motion pictures. —BIJOU (A. Hamer- 
lee. nig*.).- -St. 1ah)u and McCrusIck, sketch 
artists, good; Dolly DeMont. aoubrette, Lillian 
Weber, aoubrette, fair, and Mersel and Campbell, 
singing and talking comedians, very good. 

FOND DU LAC, WIS. 
IDEA (M. F. Carpenter, mgr.). -McKay and 
Fredericks, comedy sketch, Jack o' Toole, illustrated 
songs, good; the Roofs, comedy sketch, "A New 
Scholar;" Ben Turpln In "Happy Hooligan's 
Troubles," big hit: the Great Francellas, feature 
act. great. Coming latter pari of week, Harrison's 
Ponies. Jay Paige, Dill and Ward and Barth and 
Craig. The Franecllas held over from first of 
week. M. C. FLOOD. 

BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 

r.uoc (W. s. put tei ticid. mgr.).— Major 
O'Laughlin, gun spinner, good; Ellsmere and Cot- 
trell. big hit; Illustrated songs, local singer, 
Kiank Keep, fair; Roy Cross, slack wire artist, 
Kalamazoo boy, very good; Daly ami Murphy, 
conversationalists, hit of the bill: Jeanre and Ells- 
worth, high class singing and novelty musical BCt, 
pleased everybody. Cllnteseope, new feature pic- 
ture, "Highway Robbery." N. HITCH IK. 

READINO, PA. 

ORPllECM (Frank D. Hill, mgr.).— Bill week 

March 5, beaded by Josephine Cohan and com 
pany, presenting the sketch. "Friday, the l.'lth." 
addg hit. Gardner and Stoddard, hf ihHr skit. 
"(Vaudeville Frivolities," won rounds (if hearty Bp 
jdause. Fred Niblo cored a hit with his funny 
monologue. Stanley and Wilson pleased. Caprice, 
Lynn and Fay sing well and dance nicely. Qsslno 
Comedy Four pleased, although laughs are hard to 
get. MaStM and Masette, comedy acrobats, went 

big. The klnetograph closed the show with two 
gopd subjects. Coming, March 12, Ned Nye and 
Rollicking Girls, Four Keatons, Carlin and Otto, 
Klngarl Operatic Trio, Dorothy Kenton, Shedman's 

Dogs, Lark Ins and Patterson and klnetograph. 

BIJOU (Updegraff and Brownell, mgrs.). Week 
March •".. New York Stars, playing to fair houses 
and pleasing them. Lottie Freetnont, Campbell 
ami Curilfield. Faust Trio, Raymond and Clark ami 
Majestic Musical Four make up a phasing olio. 
Coming week March 12, Goldeu Crook Burlesquers. 



TOPEKA, KAN. 

STAR (L. M. fl la) an II mgr.).— 'Hie Gaiety Stock 
Company, under the management of L. M. Gorman, 
continues to draw. The Girls In Blue, eight pretty 
girls who sing in swings, head the bill and are 
encored, followed by Reno and Ayoru in "The. 
Clown and the Lady;" May Meeker, acrobatic 
dancer; Loralne McNeal, Irish comedienne; Jewel 

l>e Noe. singer, Sherman Thompson. Joseph Casey, 
Ed Boelker and Charles Stewart are the rest of 

the stock company. NOVELTY tA. H. Began, 

mgr.). — Ferry, In "Fairyland," Is the headliner, 
followed by Prof. Freeman and his five trained 
goats; Blair and McNulty, blackface comedians; 
Will Hart, blackface singer. Extra performances 
to accommodate the crowds. 

LOU 18 H. FRIEDMAN. 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS. 
MAJESTIC (ChaS. R. Fisher, res. mgr.).— Week 
Felt. lit), fair crowds to see a poor show. Bill 
opens with the Do Monlos, contortionists, very 
pleasing. Illustrated songs were old and miser- 
ably sung. Tom Ripley, blackface monologue, was 
only fair. Mr. and Mrs. Gene Hughes, In "A 
Matrimonial Substitute," were well received. Hur- 
dle Langdon, operatic vocalist, has a bonkatonk 
voice of the worst sort. Morris Mauley and Dolly 
Sterling, songs and dances, poor. The bill was 
aavod by Captain George Auger, the giant, ami his 
company of LUiputiuns In "Jack, the Giant 
Killer." They were exceptionally good and were 
the recipients of prolonged applause. Motion pi« - 
lures better than usual. Ne\t week. La Monte's 
trained coekatOOS, Charles Forrest and Jane Court - 
hope, Datum Brothers, Swor Brothers, Myers ami 
Rons, Sarah Beach. 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 
TEMPLE OF VAUDEVILLE (Frank E. Stoiubr. 
lessee ami mgr. >. The bill week of Feb, 2*\ con 
tallied two one-act playlets. The farce, "The 
Wall St net Broker," by George M\ Cohan, 
presented hi Castellet nnd Hall. was the 
opening act, ami the comedy drama, "Held 
for Ransom," In the hands of E. Frederick Hswley 
ami company, was the dosing number. The Cohan 
far»v was made the best of by Castellet ami Hall, 
ami brought out as much demonstration as the 
Temple patronage Is wont to bestow upon such 
in fs. The playlet present' d by Haw ley and com- 
pany really contained some dramatic virtues, ami 
in addition to the good work of the star the char- 
acter portrayed by Miss Frances Height could 
not have been In better hands; and equally as 
much can be said of the minor part played by H. 
E. Rowe. The headliner of the bill wus the mir- 
ror dancer, the Great Msrtynne, who proved a lit- 
tle better than the usual acts of such nature. 
Uoyer and French were well received. Gordon 
Kldred Is amusing as a mimic. Bill for week of 
March ft, Mile. Martha Florralne's Lions, Lucy 
ami Lucler, Ada Lewis. Ramsay Sisters. Clark 
Dandy, Nina Barbour, Illustrated songs ami the 
pictures. DE W1TTB. 



comedians, keep the audience In uproar; Harry 
Oreen, illustrated songs, made a hit; Three De 
Bollen Bros., acrobats, good ami quick in their 
action; the Astalres, in an electrical toe dance 
novelty, pleased. March 8-10, Buckeye Trio In "A 
Tramp's Dream:'' Whittle, ventriloquist, the man 
that fooled the President; Massey and Kramer 
comedy ettterralnera; Harry Brown, Harvey ami 

Devera and moving pictures. Business good. 

AUDITORIUM (Brown and Gerhart. mgrs.).— 
Week of March .", the Peerless Miss Rlalto, mirror 
and fir^ dance, a novelty ami a good act; Tom 
OlUen, "Finnlgan'a Friend," songs and Jokes, made 
good; Arto and Delinay, laughing comedy, amus- 
ing ami a hit; Musical BsrtolettS, comedy musical 
act. carry the house; 1,00117.0, comedy Juggler, 
gootl. Show closed with pictures. 

J. II. WEITZENKOW. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (C. II. Piummer mgr.). 
• -The bill offered this week Is an exceptionally 
good one. Henry Lee, likenesses of great men past 
and present, was received with great applause. 

Carver and Pollard made a fair impression. Dorset) 

and RusscU, "Musical Railroaders;" the act is 
novel and was given a g<M>d reception, Violet 
Male gate some Imitations of noted actors and was 
roundly applauded. Stuart Barms, very well liked. 
Wilson troupe of gymnasts, in a novel act Includ- 
ing feats Of strength, very much appreciated. 
Barker's Dogs ttstk well. Next week, Carleton, 
Macy and Maud Edna Hall, Bobby North, fetch lug 
Brothers and others. 8AM freeman. 

PAWTUCKET, R. I. 
NEW PAW TICKET Week March •". Lent d.tes 

not seem to have much effect on this cozy little 

theatre by the size of the houses. Einmette and 
•McNeil, in a singing and darning sister act, sing 
well an 1 dance cleverly. John Wlialejj. baton 
singing and dancing, Is good. CarnsMTand Baker, 
Hebrew comedians, kept the house In a roar. 
Frankie Heath, good. The Lippencotha, sketch 
artists, took well. Matt Bonnie's illustrated BOfigS 
were pleasing. Webster's 1 oving pictures caught 

on good. The burlesque this week is "Alphonse 
ami Gaston," very funny. — NOTES. Matt Ben- 
nii> will sing at Narraganset t I'ler this summer, 
making the third season for him there, ('has. E. 
Webster K now - booking b summer lour up through 
Vermont nnd New Hampshire with his moving pic- 
tures. NICK. 

WICHITA. KAN. 

BIJOU H'arle K. 0U011, tnirr 1. M«»na Marshaw, 
"Buster Brown" act, opened the show ami pleased; 
Little Ethel Ma!. idle sang the Illustrated song; 
Prof. Freeman's trained go;ils made good; "Phro- 
so." mechanical wonder, operated by Lillian Camp- 
hell, puzzled ami pleased. Bijoilgraph closed. Busi- 
ness big.- LYRIC (L. I'.. < o\. mgr.).- The Twit 
Wrens opened with their society act, "Her Name- 
sake," good; Illustrated vm;, George Kershaw 
sang "Kate Kearnoy;" CJiieen ami IllOa In acro- 
batic dancing, line. Lyrieacone closed. Attend- 
mice 1. in NOTE. L. o. Wilson, formerly 

manager of this theatre, gold his interest last 
Week to L, E. c..\ and has gone to Pennsylvania. 

A. C. It M'K. 

P0TTST0WN, PA. 

GRAND OPEBA HOUSE (William porter, Jr.. 
mgr.). March I, - and ;! - Alaeton Mexican. Quar- 
tet; Humes and Lewis, comedy acrobats, lots of 
•ipplaiise: Rodger* and Belle Dolan. comedy sketch. 
"Old Si.il'c Door." well received; George and 
Lara Lewis, comedy sketch, "Scarecrow," are '.ilr; 
Pit ill l..i««.i\, .■■■! •••ntrie juggler, very good; Law- 
rence Trio, in their great novelty act, "Monylln 
La Chateau," n mused and got applause, Klneto- 
graph closes the «hoW. Business excellent. Bill 
hi' M.4i<li .".7. liiitil.-lt sitd 1 ..U,i.s 11, mi art 
entitled "Everything Their Own." which pleases 
Immensely; La Maire and La Main-, Hebrew 



SAGINAW, MICH. 

JEFI'EKS (Sam S. Marks, mgr.).— The Nelson 
Family, acrobats, amused with their good work; 
Blanche Bwlgerfa illustrated songs please; Grace 
Whltcher, the Bowery Queen, got the gallery with 
her song. "He's Mo Pal;" the Three Fergusons 
end their dog North were heartily received; North 
Brothers, comedians, present "The Lost Paradise," 
assisted by Virginia Goodwin. Cal W. Cook ami 

W. A. Mortar ty. Show closes with pictures. 

NOTE. — Sam Marks has assumed the management 
of this bouse and better attractions are being 
offered with Improving business as a result. The 
Heard Brothers, acrobatic end atrial bar per- 
formers, who for the past five years have been 
with Singling Brothers, left this city March 1 for 
Santa Cruz. Cal., to Join Norrls & Bowe'a circus. 
which opened there March 10. They start out this 
year with a new aerial bar act which they claim 
is a novelty. After this season they may take - 
their act Into vaudeville. NENO. 

WATERBURY, CONN. 
THE JACQ1ES (J. W. Fllapatrlck, mgr.).— 
Miss Bae Cox was the re:il headliner of this 
week's hill, although Victor's Band was the billed 
attraction. Miss Cox, with her quaint Southern 
mannerisms, made a substantial hit and merited 
(be applause she received* Victor's Band, contain- 
ing twenty-five men, played excellently, but much 
of It was too classic for a vaudeville audience. 
Of course the Poet und Peasant overture from 
"William Tell" and the sextet from "Lucia." - 
were swung in. Why is it a musical act can't 
get away from these two much abused nuiiiliers? 
The Five Romanes presented a foreign dancing 
ret which failed to please. Frank Gardner ami 
little Vincent, in "Winning a Queen." pleased. 
as did Ollday and Fox, Hebrew singers ami 
dancers. Wood ami Barry, in a neat musical and 
dancing turn, pleased many, as did Ben Meyers 
in a physical culture "exhibition, which opened the 
show. The pictures closed the bill. Average at- 
tendance. ARTHUR H. McKECHNTE. 

LYNN, MASS, 

AUDITORIUM (Harry Ka'tfccs, mgr.). — Henry 
and Alice Taylor. In balancing ami sharpshooting, 
as the headliner. offered an exceptional}' clever 
gCt Tom Nitwu played a retnrn, hut hla present 
sketch, "A Touch of Nature," did not make the hit 
his former offering did. Lelgbton, I^dghtou and 
Lelgbton spoil the effect of their act by overcon- 
fidenee. Monroe, Mack and Lawrence, in a" 
"rough bouse" act, pleased the crowd. Beno and 
Ki. -hauls, poor. The Musical Bennetts, fair. Ca- 
dleux, wire walker, good, but did not take well. 
Good business to u rather poor bill. 

P. DAVID CHASE. 

P0UOHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 
family (E. B. Sweet, mgr.). —Opened to s. R. 

O. Monday night and continued big houses after 
noon and night. Louise Allen Collier "and com- 
pany In "A Wild Idea," well received; John TBI's 
Marionettes mad a. hit; Dale and Rossi, German 
sports, lepested encoree, gotsl turn; Jeanne Ed- 
wards, singing comedienne, fair; The Adams Duo 
in "Uncle Sam's Reverie" are gtssl, ami Mr. 
Adams' Impersonations of noted men made a hit; 
Gordon and Edwards, In "Sparkling Eyes," fair. 
Illustrated songs and motion pictures. 

W. C. MATTE BN. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

BIJOU (W. S. Butterfleld, mgr.).— Week March 
r», Potter and Harris, novelty gymnasts, very 
clever ring work; Eugean Field Lynch, local, illus- 
trated songs; the Bemstelns, singers and dancers, 
good; Miss Josephine Coles, prima donna contralto, 
possesses a Wonderful voice; the Musical spraguel- 
las, in "Satan's Pastime," went big. Pictures, 
"The Great Steeplechase." Business good. 

O. K. MOUSE. 

LONDON, ONT. 

BENNETT'S 'J. H. Alos, mgr.). Large crowds 
greeted. a splendid bill week March :, 10. Wilfred 
Clark and company headed the bill, presenting a 
comedy sketch thai kept the audience in convulsive 
laughter, Wartenberg Brothers go strong with 
their clever foul Juggling. Katherlne Dahl, the 
vocalist, is a (treat hit. Sam and Ma Kelly please 
in a rural skit. The Gardner Children make a 
good Impression with their singing and dancing 
act. Maeio ami Fox are two colored performers 
who will be heard from. The act Is decidedly 
fresh mid pleasing. The Great Zehoa offers an 
aerial act. Illustrated songs and the moving pic- 
tures close the bill. FRITZ HOUSTON. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. <» 
Foils fj, c. Cilddlc. res. mgr.) - Athletes 
predominate In* the bill this week The Jackson 

family of trick bicyclists head the list. The 
RokSow Midget* in. ke ipiite a hit with their bur- 
lequc boxing Isait. Couture and Clllett do sortie 
clever acrobatic work. George Felix and Lydla 
Barry have an offering entitled "The Boy Nfxt 
Door," lie Itellt Itrothers are exceptionally good 
dancers nnd comedians, Other m-ts were Three 
II os, Instrumentalists; tdnmlnl and Taylor, a 
singing duo, and the eleetrograph. — NELSON 
1/ T. I». mon, mgr t. Phil Sheridan's city sports 

. .: . l V u -1.. Llhu ions fcli.oi' Tl.t. i-Ulut r,.,.tn r .. , f f ||!p 
olio Is the 1 1 11 ton Hoefcr troupe of bicyclists. 
Capaeitj h> u -ivs. Coming, The Merrymakers. 



VARIETY 



ANOTHER 

WINNER! 



JOSEF YARRICK 



(Originator of THE MAGIC KETTLE) has juit completed another novelty, a SCIENTIFIC MYSTERY. This act consists of a series of interesting Scientific and Magioal Problems, introducing 
"The Aerial Couch," Magio Kettle (it boils on ice), Enchanted Candles, the Mystio Vapor, and other new and startling mysteries never before seen. It will be presented in the same artistic and 
finished manner that made the Magio Kettle famous and produced so many imitators in all parts of the world. I own, control and manage this act exclusively. Managers, book the original. 
Don't wait for inferior imitation. Am now ready to accept immediate time. Three people with the act. For particulars address 

JOSEF YARRICK (care of Beadle) 1193 Broadway, New York, or Your Agent 

Have just finished 3 weeks on the Family Theatre circuit. Manager D'Esta says: Mr. Yarrick, my patrons were well pleased with your act and spoke highly of it. You gave good satis- 
faction, "Shows you how the wind is blowing." 



JUNIE MCCREE & CO 

(THE DOPE FIEND) 



I — 



IN 



The Man fom Denver 

JACK LEVY 

WORK GETTER 140 W. 42 d Street 



KIETY 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OP ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADINO OP 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 

AT FOLLOWINO RATES: 
1 -2 Inoh aingle column, $2.00 monthly, Net 

1 Inoh ■ 4 00 

1-2 Inch double column, 4.00 

1 Inoh " 7.60 



PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 

ASK THE STARS, SOME FOR 
WHOM I'VE WORKED. 




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Seabrooke, 
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Mabelle Oilman, Irene Bent- 
ley, Annie Irish, Edna Goodrich, Eltinge, 
Nella Bergen, Elfle Fay, Mrs. Yeamans, Estelle 
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31 West 31st Street, New York 



HURTIO It SKA/ION PRESENT 

ERNEST HOGAN 



(da unbleached American) 

■• "RUFUS RASTUS 

Season 1 906---07 



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DAD U/iTT WHITES SONUS, MONO- 
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EST. 1S79. BEST ORIGINAL WORK FOR 
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Have Your Card in VARIETY 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

POLLS (E. B. MtChell, mgr.).— Hal Davis and 
company, presenting "Pals," one of the biggest 

hi i> of the season; Dixon and Holmes, fuir; Tom 
llearn. the iaxy juggler, a big hit; the De Kolk 
Trio In a good acrobatic act; Josephine Duvls, 
u'cmmI, but should get new songs; Violet Black and 
company, fair; Dayman and Franklin, good; elcc- 
trograptt. Coming, 12. Jackson Family. The Open- 
ing of George C. Tllyou's Steeplechase Island Is 
undecided at present. There will be a lot of new 
attractions added the coming season. 

W. J. BISME. 



Onlre, singing and talking comedians, hit. Good 
pictures, big business. STEVE. 



SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 

-UNfQf.% <M*s. G, W. Allsky. mgr.).— Week of 
Feb. 20: Bonny May sings well and makes a hit: 
The Great Ouzos, contortionists, make good with 
sniiie difficult work; Rudolfe Asheland, violin vir- 
tuoso, good; James II. Sadler sings "Would You 
Care," wltb Illustrations, big hit; Conly and Mc- 



BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 

UNION.— Week of Feb. 26: Metzger, Juggler 
and hoop roller, does the usual routine of stuff, 
but does it cleverly; Adelaide Power and company. 
In a comedy playlet, "A Female Paderewskl," 
scored a hit Monday evening. Miss Power and her 
supporting company are Eastern stock people. 
Musical Bentley, xylophone solos; illustrated song 

and moving pictures. NOTE. — Harrell & Got- 

chett. of the Union Theatre, are busy wltb plans 
for the new theatre to be erected for them, and 
which will l»e devoted exclusively to vaudeville. 

B. D. C. 



OCEAN TO OCEAN 

SULLIVAN & CONSIDINE 

CIRCUIT 
Largest Circuit of Family Theatres In the World 

Owning and Operating 49 First •Class Vaudeville Theatres East, North- 
west and West 

\A//lI\ITPn ** *M times. FIRST-CLASS ACTS OF ALL KINDS that 
1/1/ /-%l^ 1 sCssL^t can deliver th© goods 

SOLE BOOKING AGENTS 



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CHA8. WRAY. 219 Denny Bid*., Seattle, Waah. ARCHIE LEVY, 111 Eddy St., Ban Francisco, Cal. 



CHRIS. 0. BROWN.. 67 8. Clark St., Chicago. 



LONDON "MUSIC HALL" 

&/>e Great English Vaudeville Taper (WeeKJy) 

401 STRAND. W. C. 

American Representative — Mits Ida M. Carle, Room 708, St. James Building, where a 
file of papers can be seen and advertisements will be received 



AN ALL STAR CAST 

.IS THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE 

NEW YORK INQUIRER 

IT INCLUDES 

JOHN W. KELLER 

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CHARLES E. TREVATHAN 

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The Publication, issued Sundays, treats of Society, Wall Street 
Politics, Pacing, Sports, Automobiling, Theatres and miscellaneous 
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A Smart Paper for Smart Persons" 



Knickerbocker Theatre Annex, - New York 



through; Billy Johnson and his Creole Belles 
pleased; Brenner and Sinclair, two beautiful girls 
with elegant costumes and good danclug and Im- 
impcrsonations, were received v«>ry strongly; Stan- 
ley and Seanlon, comedy musical act, good; Nelly 
Seymour only fair; Smith O'Brien In monologue 
went strong. Good pictures. Business good. 

ELZIB. 



YONKERS, N. Y. 

IMHHC (Ilonry Myers, mgr.). — Opened big on 
Monday. Grand Opera Trio, the headllner, was a 
big hit; Gallagher and Barrett, one scream all 



LOGANSPORT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hurdle, res. mgr.).— BUI week 
of March i> includes Mnrjorle Barrett, child artist, 
clever; Jenks and Clifford made 'em scream from 
start to finish; Feme Shinier, illustrated songs; 
■DIdn, Illusion, fine; klnodrome, etc. Record break- 
ing business. March 12, Kelly and Morgan, Feme 
Shlmer, Stapleton and Chaney, Leroy Benson and 

company, Eller Metzger and others. NOTE. — 

The Bowling Is making a Whirlwind finish of 
dramatic offerings preparatory to entering the 
vaudeville arena last of the month. Two Irrespon- 
sible stage hands connected with the Dowllng, 



one with a huge hammer In his hands, attempted 
to assault Manager Iiardle of the Crystal March 5. 
The affair occurred in the heart of the business 
district, and as a score of witnesses testified, was 
wholly without provocation. One of the hood- 
lums received a series of lightning uppercuts that 
muile him see several more planets than astrolo- 
gists deserilte, while the other suffered the natural 
consequences of a solar plexus blow. Needless to 
add Mr. Iiardle was permitted to proceed without 
further Interference. REVILO. 



0L0VER8VILLE, N. Y. 

FAMILY (Fred De Bondy, res. mgr.). — Week of 
March 5: Green Brothers, baseball bat jugglers, 
good; The Great Klnsners, a well presented exhibi- 
tion of head balancing; Rhodes and Carter, comedy 
tumblers, excellent; Rillle Deaves and company, 
see New Acts; The Mysterious .Crucible, very In- 
teresting; Joste Allen, singer, a dismal failure; 
motion pictures, good. 

THD AISLB SEAT FIEND. 



VARIETY 



15 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



WATCH US CROW 



JAMES E. PLUNKETT 

BEG TO ANNOUNCE 

To their friends, managers and the profession 
THAT WE ARE DOING BUSINESS 11 THAT WE CAN BOOK GOOD ACTS 111 

THAT WE ENJOY THE CONFIDENCE OF ALL WHO KNOW US 
Glad to Hear from everybody 

REICH AND PLUNKETT 

Suite 1024, St. James Building 

'Phono, 2362 M*d. NEW YORK OITY 

The Stars' Hea dquarter s for Vaudeville 

W. L. LYKENS' VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

31 WEST 31st STREET, NEW YORK 



Tel., 4967 Madison 
B. A. 



Cable, Myeraba 
E. S. 



MYERS KELLER 

GENERAL VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 

31 West 3 1 st Street, New York 

Pitrot&Girard 

International Vaudeville Agents. 
1265 Broadway, New York 



Tel., 4615 Madison. 



Alex. Steiner 

VAUDEVILLE AGENT 

Booking Foreign and Native Acts. 

ST. JAMES BUILDING, NEW YORK. 



Tel. 3487 Bryant. Cable, "Control," New York. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

HOLLAND BUILDING. 

Anything There's a Dollar In 

JACK LEVY 

140 West 42d St. New York 

YOU CAN BE BOOKED 

ALBERT SUTHERLAND 

VAUDEVILLE BOOKINGS 

Phone 52K5 Madiaou St. Jamen Building 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP HIOH CLASS VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

M. MEYERFELD, JR., Pre*. 

MARTIN BECK, General Manager. 
FRANK VINCENT, N. Y. Representative. 
All Applications for Time Must be Addressed to 
C. B. BRAY, Booking Manager, 
Majestic Theatre Bldg.. Chicago, 111. 




Wm, Morris 



AAA 



♦ ♦ ♦ 




▼ ▼▼ 



Now at 6 West 28th St. Will on March 15 Remove to the 

Holland Bldg., Broadway and 40th Street 



THE 12 OFFWES FORMERLY OCCUPIED BY 

MESSRS. KLAW & ERLANCER 

BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY THE FOLLOWING 
LEADING VAUDEVILLE THEATRES: 



i 



P. G. Williams' Colonial. 

P. G. Williams* Orpheum. 

P. G. Williams' Alhambra. 

P. G. Williams' Novelty, Bklyn. 

P. G. Williams' Gotham, Bklyn. 

P. G. Williams' Manhattan 
Bench. 

G. Williams' Bergen Beach. 

Henry Myers', Doric, Yonkers. 

Henry Myers', Atlantic City. 

Henry Myers', Doric, Camden. 

Keeney's, Brooklyn. 

Trent Theatre, Trenton. 
Morrison's, Rockaway. 
Henderson's, Coney Island. 
Deimllng's, Rockaway. 
International, Chicago. 



Haintnersteln's Victoria. 

Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 

S. Z. Poll's, New Haven. 

S. Z. Polls, Hartford. 

S. Z. Poll's, Worcester. 

S. Z. Poll's, Springfield. 

S. Z. Poll's, Bridgeport. 

S. Z. Poll's, Waterbury. 

S. Z. Poll's, Jersey City. 

S. Z. Poll's, Scranton. 

S. Z. Poll's, Wllkes-Barre. 

Sheedy's, Fall River. 

Sheedy's, Newport. 

Hathaway's, New Bedford. 

Hathaway's, Lowell. 
Hathaway's, Brockton. 



F. F. Proctor's 23d St. 

F. F. Proctor's 5th Ave. 

F. F. Proctor's 58th St. 

F. F. Proctor's 125th St. 

F. F. Proctor's. Newark. 

F. F. Proctor's, Albany. 

F. F. Proctor's, Troy. 

Wllmer & Vincent, Utlca. 

Wllmer & Vincent, Reading. 

Wllmer & Vincent, Allentown. 

Weber & Rush, Binghamton. 

Weber & Rush, Schenectady. 

Weber & Rush, Wheeling. 

II. II. Lamkln's, Toledo. 

ll. II. Lamkln's, Dayton. 

Auditorium, Lynn. 

I. C, Mlshler, 11th Ave. Opera 
House. Altoona, Pa. 

New Family Theatre, Johns- 
town, Pa. 



12 WEEKS IN NEW YORK CITY WITHOUT 5. REPEAT, 12 



(Telephones \ 

1465-1466-1467 Madison/ 



6 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 



Cable Address \ 
Willmorrls / 



.S.BENTHAM 

The Producing Vaudeville Agent 

Booking Everywhere 



St. James Bldg:. 

Phone 44KS Mad. 



NEW YORK 

Cable Address Frebernian 



BORNHAUPT BBSr™"*'- 

St. James Bldg. Tel. 4554 Mad. Sq., New York. 

IDA CARLE 

St. James Building 

SOU HOOKING AOENT FOR 

Dollie Bell's Dancing Troupes 

Smartest Dancing Girls In England. BIX EM- 
PIRE GIRLS on tour In America. EIGHT PHI- 
MOSES on tour In AUSTRALIA. POPPIES (8) 
and other Troupes open after April 

CHAS. ESCHERT 

with Al Sutherland, St. James Building. 
Hooking only good acts. 



New York Representative 

Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 

Al>. MAYER 

VAUDEVILLE AQENT 



Room 803, St. James Building 
B'way and 26th Street, New York 

Tel., 3847 Madison. 



H. B. MARINELLI 

NEW YORK PARIS LONDON 

Cable. Cable, Cable. 

•■MHfcrskh" "Uptodste Paris" "Hr.ivisslmo- -I.nnil<>n" 

St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway. 
Ifclephone, 2462 Madison. 



FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS SS 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



MANAGERS AND AGENTS, ATTENTION! 







Presented for first 

time in New YorK 



A MYTIilGfAL, 

GAPRIGE 



Including MISS HELEN NELSON 
44 



A BIT OF BLARNEY 



99 



AT HURTIC AND SEAMON'S, WEEK OF MARCH 5 



Biggest and Prettiest Act Ever Offered in Vaudeville 



Four Scenes, Ten Characters, Numberless Surprises 



i6 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 






"THE HIT OF THE SEASON" 



CHARLES 






(OF EVANS & HOEY PARLOR MATCH FAME) in a One-Act Farce by George Arliss Called 

"IT'S UP TO YOU, WILLIAM" 

Scored an A-E-I-O-U-NORMOUS HIT at Proctor's 

5th Avenue, Proctor's 58th Street and 23rd Street Theatre 

"It was more than a success. It was a triumph of good acting, good management and good sense."— Mo "» n * ™««pa- 

WE EK MARCH 12, ■ ALHAMBRA THEATRE 

BACK TOGETHER AGAIN 
THE ORIGINAL 

"riTZGIBBOIN-McGOY TRIO 

BERT FITZCIBBON—ALICE FITZCIBBON— THOS. O. R. McCOY 

In "A Mischievous Brother" 

Act was a big Hit At Shea's Theatres, Buffalo and Toronto, the past two weeRt; same this weeK at Gotham, 
Brooklyn. To Managers s Bert Fitzgibbon has signed a five years' contract with me. Address 
Tel., 3264 J, Harlem. THOS. O. R. McCOY, Manager, 1996 Madison Avenue. Netv Vork City. 



•• 



FRANCESCA REDDING 

in "Her Friend From Texas" 

Rewritten, costumed and uniformed Just 0*F laugh. Ask any bod 

Next-- WYOMING --Season 

Management SHERWOOD & 9ILBR. Chicago 

JOE EDMONDS 



JOS. 



J. w. 



Madden -Jess 

Invite Offers for Next Season 
Address cere of Utopians. En Route 



Thft jad-^; do - da Vaudeville 



.he Hpw- 



EDDIE SIMMONS 



will shortly 
sppsar 



S&. Genaro 1 Bailey US* £S 



T ± e Famous Jackson Family 

The World's Most Marvelous Troupe of Trick 

Cyclists 

Were a decided HIT at Springfield, Week of March 5th, HEADING THE BILL 

KLEIN-OTT BROS. & NICHOLSON 

America's Leading Musical Artists 
(MYERS & KKLI.KR, Agents.) 



MARCH 5— MIDDLETOWN. CONN. 
MARCH 12— NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



MARCH 19 — DANBURY, CONN. 

MARCH 2tl— YONKKRS, N. Y. 



SPEOIAL FEATURE FENBERG SIOOK OO. 



— BEST PbAGES TO STOP AT — 



Professions] Bates. $1 Doable; $1.25 Single. 

THK BERKSHIRE HOTEL 

J.i Hies Strauss, Prop. 
721 727 Franklin St., Reading, Pa. 
Four blocks from Orpheum Theatre. One-half 
block from stage entrance to Bijou Theatre. One- 
half block from Franklin St. Depot. 



Professional's Hsadquarters 
MILLER'S HOTEL (American Plan) 

S. 10. comer Tenth and Race Sts., Philadelphia. 
A new and up-to-date hotel, home comforts. Rates 
$1.50 and $2.00 per day. Special Rates to Pro- 
fessionals. Harry C. Miller, Prop. 



Professional Headquarters 

THE BRIDGE MOTEL 

Bowery and Delanccy Sts., N. Y. City, 2 doors 
above Miner's Theatre. Elegant furnished rooms. 
Rooms* reserved by letter. Horn and Driscoll, 
Proprietors; Win. J. Rellly, Manager. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
UHE VA/fVEnMLU 

OONVINIEMTLY LOCATED 



KENOSHA, WIS. 

BIJOU (John O'Brien, res. amr.) .— Bill for first 
part of week March 5, the ReSjos, comeily sketch; 
William McUohic, a clever comedian; Barih and 
Craig. blackfS.ee comedians, clever dancers; M;.ud 
l.e Page, dancing in drum imitations and singing: 
Mnrtinetti and Sylvester, comedy acrobatic act, 
• lever. Klneloscopp closes the show. Coining, 
March 8, Barlow and Kane, cdtnedj sketch; Harry 
Van Fossen, blackface comedian; Musical Toys. 
comedy musical net; Frank Corns r, comedy Jug- 
gling and wire; Martlncttl and Sylvester, feature 
act. is beld over t lie entire week. 

TED BAN FORD. 

BALTIMORE, MS. 

MONUMENTAL (Jos. Kernan, mgr.).— Week 5: 
Nettie Grant's New London Gaiety- -G+ris.- Busi- 
ness fair. The opening comedy "Way Out West," 
is very poor, followed by an olio consisting of 
Emma O'Neill with songs; the Vedmars, comedy 



acrobats; Clara Adams and Eva Swinburne, sing- 
ers and dancers; White, Ferguson and Grant, in 
their laughable sketch "Lawyer Knott," and Bls- 
sett and Scott, clog dancers. The performance 
closed with the burletta "Mixing Things Up." 

OAYETY (W. L. Ballauf, mgr.).— Week 5: W. 
S. Clark's Jersey Lilies Extravaganza Company 
pleased large audiences. The opening is a musi- 
cal skit entitled "J lie Disputed Check," intro- 
ducing Dan Tracy, who won Immediate favor by 
his impersonations. The olio Is headed by Howell 
and Emerson, talking, dancing and singing come- 
diims; Toby Zara and Violet Stetson, baton manip- 
ulators; Bens Washburn and Sadie Vedder, songs 
and dances; Paul and Aurthur, with odd musical 
Instruments; Bahlne, O'Neill and Vara, in "The 
Arrival of Kitty McCarthy," and the Dluus troupe 
of acrobats, two women and live men, who were 
easily the feature of the performance. Tne pro- 
gram ends with the sketch "The Two Colonels," 
introducing the entire company. 

LOWENSTEIN. 



GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 



If subscribing "as per 
route" mail postal of any 
change to insure receipt. 

Subscribe now 

and be sure of 

VARIETY 



EACH WEEK 



YORK, PA. 

PARLOR (J. J. Pyle, mgr.).— Bill for week March 
S, HumeS ami I.e\\is, comic acrobatics, big hit; 
Prof. Krlesel's cats, dogs and monkeys, good; 
('lemons and Msssey, song and dance, dancing ex- 
cellent; Edw. K. Cassady, Illustrated songs, fair; 
moving pictures, good. Marriot Twins close as 
good a bill as we have had here for some time. 
Capacity business nightly. TR1XIE. 



HOBOKEN, N. J. 

EMPIRE (A. M. Bruggemann, mgr.).— Week 8: 
Klein and Clifton, fair; George Archer's Five 
Filipino Girls pleased; Billy Van, the Minstrel 



I \ 



! 



Man, made good; The S'medley-Arthur Company, 
presenting "The Little Mother," the hit of the 
bill; Mile. Latino, the physical culture girl, good; 
Dixou, Bowers and Dixon, in "The Three Rubes." 
made a hit; T. W. Eckert and Emma Berg, In 
the "Land of Two Moons," got a rousing recep- 
tion; Orpheus Comedy Four, big lilt; Klnetograph. 
Next week: Four Lukens, Grand Opera Trio, Jack 
Mason's Five Society Belles, 0. K. Sato, Ray- 
mond sud Caverly, Klngsley and Lewis, Barry 
und Hslvers, Mrs. Doherty's Poodles, Ethel Rob- 
inson, Klnetograph. Business excellent. 

NOTES.— Nat Haines signed lust Friday for 40 
w.eks on the Keith Circuit for next season. The 
Empire goes on the Keith Circuit next season. 

JOHN J. BRENNAN. 



• 






. 






VARIETY 



17 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Big Hit at 

Hammerstein's 

Victoria 



The DANCING MITCHELLS 



Always playing the leading vaudeville 

theatres in America 



"HUMAN TOPS 



99 



May Boley 

AND THE DASHING 

Polly Girls 



u 



AND THE GOMIGAb 

VILLAGE GUT-UPS 



M 



AS PRd8ENTdD IN 

RICHARD CARLE'S 
MusiGal Comedy Triumph 

"The Maid and the Mummy" 

DIR&GTIOIN Or M. S. BEINTHAM 



Dave Marion 



IN 



Scenes from New York East Side Life 

" Is genuinely funny." — Chicot. 
20 people in cast. Time of act, 20 minutes 

Address AL SUTHERLAND, St. James Building 



THE 2 




EERS 



For sensationalism, the Meet's in tbeir vilr<> work make (ho hoart boat quickor. tiio humor- 
ous brother providing tiio laughs, making some of the most hazardous tricks look quite 
simple. — The Toronto Daily Star, Tuesday, February L'o, 1006. 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



S. K. HODGDON. 



WILLIAM MORRIS. 



LIONEL E. LAWRENCE, La to St ago Director New York Themtro 

PRESENTS 

"RIALTO GIRLS" 

Introducing a Stage Rehearsal, showing with absolute fidelity the "Other Side" of being 
a "Show Girl." Stage Hands, Orchestra, Audience, etc., ALL PART OF THIS ACT 



m NORTON 




Booked over the Orpheum, Anderson, Kohl A Castle 
circuits, beginning Nov., '06 



NICHOLSON 



in "ELLA'S ALL RIGHT" 



Week March 19, Pastor's 



ADAMS & MACK 



BURLESQUE MAGIC 



Keith's Union Sq., Week March 12th 



N. Y. THEATRE I SUNDAY MARCH 11TII 

AMERICAN THEATRE » 8>UMA1 ' MABLtl 111 "' 

N. Y. OPENING. AGENTS SEE THIS ACT. 

JOE MORRIS 

" THE HEBREW WITH THE PIPES " 

SPISSELL BROS.- MACK 

IN THEIR ORIGINAL ACROBATIC COMEDY 

"SCENES IN A CAFE" 




Electric 
Ballet 



WitH 3 \/A: 



R GIRLS 




ILLIE 
ESTON 



Imitator of Popular Actors. 

Address WM. MORRIS, 



Lulu Watts 



Singing and Talking Comedienne 
In Vaudeville. 



WHALEN & WEST 

in an eccentric CODMdy act with an abundance of eccentricities, liavc a few vacant dates previous 
to our returning to (Jreat Britain. 



WEEK MARCH 5— PASTOR'S. 



Permanent addrtss, 239 East llth St. 



. Theodore Murphy 

Principal Comedian 





With AL REEVES 9 
CO. 



THE ORIGINATOR OF THE MESSENGER BOY ON THE VAUDEVILLE STAGE. 

AL. W. MADDOX, Supported by MAYBELLE MELVIN 

PRESENTING THE UNIQUE CHARACTER SKIT 

"J\ T THE STATION" 

WELL, GUESS THEY ALL 



•• 



CAUGHT US 



» ♦ 



BOOKED 40 WEEKS WHILE PLAYING PASTOR'S THIS WEEK. 

YERS & KELLER, EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 

Correspondents Wanted 

Wherever there is a Vaudeville or Burlesque Theatre 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Varikty. 



I 



18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



! 



The FRANCO- 
AMERICAN 
COMEDIENNE 



Specially engaged for March 5, Washington, D. C; March xa, Baltimore; March 19, Philadelphia; then four weeks in New York City. 

JEANETTE DUPRE 



At liberty after April 16. 



For time and terms address (permanently) Hotel Navarre, New York. 



ROSE WENTWORTH 

WAIT FOR THE NEW ACT 



CATHERINE 



HAYES 



SABEL 




It\ Their Big Scenic Novelty 







"A Dream of Baby 



THE HEAVIEST ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



OPEN AT WILMINGTON WEEK OF MARCH 19th 



REIFF BROS. 

America's Best dinging and Dancing Act 

POLI CIRCUIT ASK WM. MORRIS 

A man who's wise will advertise 

And taKe this as a Hint 
There's not an actor on the stage 

WHo dosn't liRe His name in print 



HERZOC'S HORSES 



THE GREAT HORSE SHOW 

MANUEL and JOSEPHINE HERZOC 

MARSHALL: 



and his German essitttnt, IERR PAUL, fuit returned from their successful tour of Europe. 

ADDRESS WILLIAM MORRIS 




LEVY 



Popular 
Morning 
Telegraph 
Artist 



Harry Corson Clarke 



ACCOMPANIED BY 



Margaret Dale Owen 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TIME FILLED 



JSy except 



HOWARD AND NORTH 

Mr. Fred Karno's && c, 

"A Night in an English Music Hall" 

Manager, ALF. REEVES. Agents, Wm. MORRIS and H.B. MARINELIJ 



JAMES THORNTON 

Owing to extensive booking hove canceled 

European time 

/>/>•«• 24BO J H»n. m Address, 1420 FHth Avo., New York 



ED 




Better act than I ever saw you do, 



JAMES THORNTON 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the propetty of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in London, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



MAJESTIC Presenting a High 
MUSICAL Class Musical 
FOUR Comedy Act 

Entire new act next season. Feature with 
"New York Stars" Co. 



Gruet&Gruet 

BLACK FACE COMEDIANS 

En Route Williams' M Ideals" Co 



COMEDY, ACROBATIC I NOVELTY ACT 

Faust Trio 

V. Jerome, Lottie Freemont. J. Ross. 
with "New York St»rs." 

OPEN JUNE 3d AND LATER 

Address 939 B. 156th St.. N. Y. City 

McdioiN & Smith 

Artistic Delineators of Refined Singing and 

Wooden Shoe Dancing. 
Address WM. MORRIS 



BROCKMAN, MACK 



"THE COUNT ON MOTHER'S ACCOUNT" 



BELMONT 

Booked until June 11th. It's a good aot 




When answering advertisements kindly mention Varikty. 



ill) 



\ 



VARIETY 



T— 






19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



GRACE Von STUDDIFORD 

RETURNS TO AMERICA 

For a Limited Vaudeville Engagement 

PROCTOR'S NEWARK, MARCH 12TH 

23RD STREET, " 19TH 

58TH STREET, " 26TH 

ALEXANDER STEINER, Manager 



cc 
sc 



BESSIE VALD ARE'S 

T*RO\7TE OF CYCLISTS 

Smartest Dressed and Most Refined Bicycle Act Before the Public. 
Management - - - - . I. M. CARLE 

VAUDEVILLE'S FAVORITES ' 

dave GEN ARO ANO BAILEY ray 

Assisted by EDDIE SIMMONS 

Will produce in the Month of May their new offering entitled: "TONY" 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, CHAS. 



IN THEIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS— CAPT. KIDD 



PER ADD., 31 CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N Y 



MRS. ANNIE YEAMANS 

^M) -DAVGHTEK- JENNIE 
DECEMBER AND MAY in Vaudeville 



A Few Press Opinions of Bobby RAYMOND AND CLARK, Maggie Lee En Route N. Y. STARS 



Pittsburg Gazette, Oct. 23. 
Raymond and Clark are something more than the 
rapid tire conversationalists, which they are ad- 
vertised. They are a pair of the heat comedians 
on the variety circuit. Their jokes are new, and 
yesterday at the Gaiety they kept their hearers 
convulsed with laughter as long as they remained 
on the stage. 



Providence Journal, Sept. 19. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid tire conversationalists, 
have an especially good turn. Tin- man ls^artlc- 
ularly clever and the woman sings soine™unny 
parodies. 



and Clark, rapid Are . onversatlonallsts, get off a 
number of sprightly local gags which keep the 
audience In a roar from the time they are on the 
stage until they retire. 



Kansas City World, Mot. 87. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid fire conversationalists. 
sent some healthy shots at the local police and 
the notorious union depot. This made a hit with 
the patrons. 



Cincinnati. Ohio, Oct. 30. 
The Olio acts are all hits. Raymond and Clark 
In their rapid Are conversation and clever parodies 
captured the laughing honors. The act went with 
a hurrah. 



Pittsburg Chroniole, May 16. 
Raymond and Clark have one of the best conver- 
sational turns ever given at the Academy. Their 
dialogue Is replete with local coloring. 



Holyoke Evening Telegram, Feb. 2. 
Raymond and Clark, billed as rapid tire conver- 
sationalists, lived up to their title, and the pair 
exchanged some of the brightest and wittiest 
repartees heard in the theatre this season. 



Baltimore Sun, May 2. 
Rob Raymond and Maggie Lee Clark have one of 
the best sketches seen at the house this season. 



Cincinnati Commercial, Oct. 30. 
Raymond and Clark were especially good. The 
Introduction of Mr. Raymond upon the scene In a 
most eccentric* fall fairly convulsed fhe audience 
with laughter. 



Nashville Banner, Nov. 7. 
Tlie specialties are for the most part below the 
average seen at this house, though there are two 
which show up to excellent advantage. Raymond 



Springfield (Mass.) Daily News, Jan. 80, 1806. 

The hit of the show was scored by Raymond and 
Clark In a rapid fire conversational act that kept 
the audience laughing steadily while they were on 
the stage. They have a barrel of brand new stuff, 
all of which Is bright and clever, and the few 
familiar Jokes that are put In are merely to give 
the audience n rest. 



Philadelphia Item, Oot. 15. 
Raymond and Clark were very pleasing In a 
singing and talking act. Their songs are catchy, 
and their witty sayings and jokes set the audience 
Into roars of laughter who were loath to leave 
them off the stage. 



Variety. 
Telegraphed to same from Buffalo. 
Raymond and Clark are the best In the Olio. 
Their act received much favorable comment about 
town on account of the number of original sayings 
they have. An original act Invariably sets Buffalo 
talking. CHAS'. W. OOETZ. 



STUART BARNES 

DIR ECTION CEO. MOm/lNS 

Carson Bros. 



THE MODERN ATHLETES 



DIRECTION OP P. J. CASEY 



8T. JAMBS BUILDING 



MAY HOWARD 



AND STILL 
THEY COME I 



RYAN AND RICHFIELD CO 



" Mag Hoaoenys Famei " 

Produced at Tony Pastor's 
Theatre. May 23, 1901. 



ike Hoggenys uougnier 

Produced at Flurtlg & Sea-, 
moil's Music Hall, Oct. 12, 
1903. 



Moo Hcooenys Reception " 

Produced at Shea's Theatre, 
Toronto, Can., Feb. 12. 1908. 



(All by Will M. Cressy.) Per. address P. (). Rox 86, Sayvllle, L. I., N. Y. 



CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



AGINT, H. B. MARIMFLLI 



Bell & Richards 

ica's Queen of Burlesque, En Route With Her Own Co. I Ai%w ^ s ^ an v^Z-* *"° MUS '° 

DIRECTION OF JAMES E. FENNESSY MllOf ICail leairG 



Sunday, March 11th 



WEEK MARCH 12th, CIRCLE THEATRE 



JOSEPH 



K 



WATSON 



Signed for next season. 



"THE LITTLE HEBREW GENTLEMAN." P.S.— Will sever partnership with Mr. Harrv Keeler at end of nen«on on best of terms 

When answering advertisements hindly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



M O WATTS 

SEASON 1006 RINOLING OR OS.-S EASON 1907 EUROPE 





. S. BENTHAM 



PRESENTS 



THE 



ORIGINAL TWEEDLEPUNCH 



OF 



"FLORODORA" 

MS. A. KIERNAN & CO. 

JAMES HORAN'S 

Latest Musical Comedy Vaudeville 

^Taming the Beast 



3-LEIGHT0NS-3 

A ONE NIGHT STAND IN MINSTRELSY 

Week February 26, ALHAMBRA. 
Addr.ss JACK LEVY, 1 40 West 42d St., New YorK City 

"Six Empire Girls" 

VAUDEVILLE'S ■ NEWEST SENSATION 

DIUKCT FROM LONDON. FIRST AMERICAN AITEARANCE. 

EN ROUTE "DREAMLAND BURLESQUERS" FOR 10 WEEKS. 
For Open Time, Address 
CHARLES BELL, Manmgor En Routm or Car* of VARIETY 



DAN 



CHAS. 



AVERY and HART 

Greatest Colored Team in Vaudeville 

ASK \MIr\. MORRIS 

NOT VEX, BUT SOON 



» 



THE AMTJITIOUS ASSASSINATOR OF MELANCHOLIA " 



WHO TALKS 

AND SINGS 



BILLY WALSH 

Now holplnj; to enlarge the bank account of Geo. M. Fenlx-rg, Mgr. of the most expensive stock 
organization travelling. 

MIDDLESEX THBATBB, Middletown, Conn., THIS WEEK. 
LYCEUM THEATRE. New Britain, Conn., NEXT WEEK. 

ST. ONCE BROS. 

We Have Wheels Too, But WeJIide Ours! 

Direction of the ED Director, P. J. CASEY, St. James Bid*. 

The Famous and Original 

GRAND OPERA TRIO 

IN THE PRISON SOENE FROM "FAUST" 

Booking Agent. WM. MORRIS 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



FINISHING SECOND SEASON SPECIAL FEATURE KEITH CIRCUIT 









E 



A Makeup as Beautiful 
as Lillian Russell's. 



An Incomparable Act l%?$ c£?Tlx %i ™ m 



Fittgerald. 



COMEDIANS, SINGERS 

HARRY ~~^^^^^^. * * * •AND • • . • 

TRAVESTY STARS. 



CAL 0. 



WALT 



ERs 

"MARCH is7 

HURTIC & SEAMON'S 

WM. MORRIS. Per. add. HOTEL SARANAC 



IROUTY 



CHAS. J. BURKHARDT 

"The Man With the Funny Slide" 

Thanks to managers for kind offers 
Regards to all friends with "JOLLY GRASS WIDOWS" 



CHARLES B. LAWLOR 

AUTHOR ANO COMPOSER, PRESENTING 

CHARLES B. LAWLOR and DAUGHTERS 

CHARLES MABEL ALICE 

Author "Sidewalks of New York," "The Mick Who Throw the Brick," "The Best In the 
House is None Too Good for Rellly," "How Can Things be on the Level When 
the World is Round?" AND OTHERS. 

Character, Comedy and Descriptive Vocal Sketch t* 4313 Riverside 

I EO P.ARRILLO 

The California Mimic 

THE ONLY AMERICAN "CHINAMAN" ON THE STA6E 

CHICOT said in Variety— "A Real Chinaman" 

BOOKING THROUGH WILLIAM MORRIS 



ADAMS 



AND 



DREW 



PRESENTING 

"A BOGUS CHAUFFEUR" 

MANAGEMENT AL SUTHERLAND. ST. JAMES BLDG. 



CharleCASAD & DeVERNE Grace 

Novelty Musical Entertainers All First-Class Agents 



VARIETY 



Is the Artists' Paper, 
Your card In It will toe read. 



-. ,.- - 



VARIETY 



21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



W. 



C. YOUNGSON'S 

— SPOOK MINSTRELS 

Booked Solid Until July 2 by WILLIAM MORRIS The Sensational Novelty 

Just returned after successful engagement on Orpheum Circuit 



A TRIUMPH 

IN — 



DUFFIN-REDCA Y 

VnAfinF Introducing the 

M #■€#€/ mmL Triple Summersault 

The Only Aot Doing • Triple. Now Booking Time for Next Season. Address Myers A Keller 

Gilday * Fox 

, Hebrew Character Comedians 

Week March 5— Poll's, Waterbury, Conn. Booked solid until June 11 by Win. Morris. 

Address WM. MORRIS. 

WILFRED CLARKE 



Eddie Leonard 

A Positive Hit In VaudevlUe with 

"^/l DUE AM Iff 'DUTIELAW 

Agisted by the SHARP BROTHEKS. Address: JACK LBVY, HO West 42d St, N. Y. 

o»>i INNESS & RYAN -<" 



Booked Solid. 



CONVERSATIONALISTS AND IINGBR& Aj?t. Jo Paige Smith. 



Assisted by MISS THEO CARCW <& CO. 

Presenting His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE *nd WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 

AOORtSS, LAMBS' CLUB 

BIG HIT IN VAUDEVILLE 



ONARLBS ROBINSON 

America's Famous Character Comedian 

FEATURED WITH 1 Hh BIO SUCCESS 

"THE GOL.ONIAL, BELLES" 

mANAGBMENT .... CAMPBELL A DRBW 



By Special Arrangement With Frank I*. Perley 




Collins 

Lata of Jae Wmbor's All-Star Cast 

Per. Address, 186 8th St., Elmhurst, L. I. 'Phono 221 Newtown 

The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 



AND HER 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK QARFIELD 
JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIGHE 



Accompanist 



W. L. LYKENS, Manager 

Staged by CD. ROGERS 



"THE PRIINGB GMftRMING" 



QMjette 



Late Prima Donna Star of "The Clin and the Bandit" Opera) 

APPEARS IN VAUDEVILLE 

In a Musical Comedietta Entitled 



Accidents Will Happen" 




THE KING OF IRELAND 



JAMES B. DONOVAN 



AND 



MISS HE ft A ATt/IOLl) rsi CO. 

Queen of Vaudeville 

In their Laughing Suooess, "TWENTY MINUTES ON BROADWAY " 
Booked Solid. ASK MORRIS. 



3 DUMONDS 

PARISIAN STREET SINGERS 

Including JOSEPH DUMOIND, Violin Virtuoso 
/VAesrcH 12-Provldence 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE ORIGINAL MUSICAL COMEDIAN 



<* 



The Man 
with the 
Talking 
Machine 

For Burlesque, Vaudeville or 



tt 




Y 





IG 



Address en route Tiger Lilies Co., or 335 3d Ave., N. Y. City 

PIT HOeRTY F»OR NEXT SEASON 



THE 3 AMERICAN GIRLS 



Isabella 

HURD 



Maria 



THERESA 

In a refined ainglng act 



Sadie 

HURD 



BOBBY, NORTH 

HEBREW COMEDIAN 

Lata Star "Clri from Kay'a" SUOOESS IN VAUDEVILLE 

Material by Aaron Hoffman 

J ewell's M annikins 

A revelation in statecraft, with a repuiati- n encii elms: the earth. 

World's champion manipulators of wooden actors and actresses 

• ' The Big Agent— P. J. CASEY, St. James Bldg. 

Harry La. Rose Co. 




KATIE 
BARRY 



Keith circuit until June. 
Booked by n. S. Bentham. 




IN 






"THE SAILOR AND THE HORSE" 

See William Morris 



Acknowledged to be the GREATEST ATTRACTION IN VAUDEVILLE 

L.E DOMINO ROUGE 

44 The Girl in the Red Domino" 

Under Direction off LUESCHER * WERBA. NEW YORK THEATRE BLDG. 

Mr. and Mrs. GARDNER CRANE and CO. 

PRESENTING THEIR NEW PLAY. 

"A YANKEE'S LOVE FOR DIXIE." 

BOoKM) SOLID VNT1L JUNE lat. 

ALHAMBRA, NEW YORK, MARCH 12TII. 

JOHN GRIEVES 

OFFERING HI8 

"Parisian Belles" Co. En route 

THE BE8T COMPANY ON THE ROAD 

Mallory Bros., Brooks and Halliday 

Musicians* Singers and Dancers 

"Mallory Bros., BrooRs and Halliday Have a musical 
act that is good."- CHICOT. 

March 6, Amphlon Theatre, Brooklyn Per. Ad. Mallory Broo.' Cottage, Jacksonville, III. 

ROLLICKING 

HILDA THOMAS 



B. C. Whitney's 
SHOW GIRL CO. 



COMEDIENNE 



WEEK MARCH 12. MURRAY HILL THEATRE 




Melvin 



v The Most. Marvellous Gymnastic Act In the World Accomplishing Seemingly Impossible Feats 



Hayman <& Franklin 

In their new offering 

"A SUIT FOR DIVORCE" 



Long, loud and legitimate laugha 
BOOKED BY WILLIAM MORRIS 



Have you aaen 



OMAR SINGH 



land his 



"HUMAN BUTTERFLY" 



OT1\> PARIS, 1st Tenor. 



HENRY l' A 11IS. Baritone. 



The White City Quartette 

March 1ft— Grand O. II., Indlunapolls. April — Columbia, St. LouIb. 

Muich 26— Majestic, Chicago. April 16— Open. 

April 2— Haymarket, Chicago. April 23— Temple, Detroit. 

ALL Ol'EN AFTER. 

\VM. I'ARIS. 2nd Tenor. GEO. DONALDSON, Basso. 



TO 




H EAR N 



"THE LAZY JUGGLER" 

Acknowledged by SIME to be the Funniest Juggling Act in 
America. ^^^ 

ra MAY BELFORT 

A Refined and Artistic Rendering of Stories in Song 

THAT'S ALL. MR. GEO. HOMANS, Manager 

IRENE LEE 

"The Girl in Trousers" 

Pastors), March 12 

HARRY THOMSON "•'"""*' 



"THE MAM WITH THE GOODS" 



Brooklyn 



THE ORIGINAL 



r 



Three Madcaps 

1NIINA AMY PANSY 



BOOKED SOLID 



PANSY 

Address AL. flAYER, St. James Building 



Whan answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 









VARIETY 



23 






REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




IN " 



GLORIA 



99 



By ALF HAMPTON 



Now in Vaudeville 



An Elaborate Scenic Playlet of Western Life 








Address William Morris 



EMMA FRANCIS 



and 
her 




Arabian Whirlwinds 

VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION OF M. S. BENTHAM 

DORSCH & RUSSELL 

THE MUSICAL RAILROADERS 

Address 408 Morris Ave., Newark, N. J. 
or Al. Sutherland 

Still at the Switch (Not Astsss) 

RICE & PREVOST 

IN 

BUMPTY BUMPS 



Arthur J. 



Miss Grace 



McWATERS «d TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDEVILLE" 



ALICE 



PHILBROOKS 

and SIDNEY 

REYNOLDS 

Present 

"MISS STEHO, STENOGRAPHER" 

A (lerman Comedy Sketch 

ROLAND WEST 



• • • *» <r • • • 



JOCKEY JONES 

Management Myera A Keller, 31 W. 31 at St. 

KITTIE STEVENS 

7 character dances and changes In 10 minutes. 
WEEK FEB. 10, KEITH'S, BOSTON 



IRENE U/\ TOUR 

ANDHEH 3 A £ A 



CLEVER DOO 
309 West 24th Street 



NEW YORK 



F. Daly Burgess 

GOMBDIAIN 
In Vaudeville 

THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

FJOE MMM MARK 

ields-Woiley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week March 12, Portland, Me. 

ED. F.REYNARD 



Season 

Season 

Season 
Season 

Season 
Season 



Ventriloquist 

1901-2 — Great Lafayette Show. 

1902 o S Primrose and Docks tader's 

' / Minstrels and Empire Show. 
1903-4 — Orpheum Show. 
1904-5 — Touring England. 
1905-6— Touring America. 
1906-7 — Orpheum Show. 

Exclusive Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 



HILL AND SYLVANY 

Address WM. MORRIS. 
Ifareh 12 — Lowell, Mass. 

March 19 — New Bedford, Mass. 

March 26 — Lynn, Mass. 

BILLIE RITCHIE 



ii 



The Drunk" 



A Night in an English Music Hall 

The PELOTS 

Odd and Humorous 

JUGGLERS 

ORPHEUM, BALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

EXPOSITION FOUR 

(3 ALEXANDERS and BRADY) 




LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 

JACK INORWORTH 

Presents THE COLLEGE BOY 



Bush Gordon 

"HURLY BURLY COMIQUES" 

Season 1905-6. the vaudeville at ractlon 
"Jolly Grass Widows." At liberty May 3d 

Gardner iVincent 

"WINNING A QUEEN" 

Booked Solid for 3 Years 

NANON JACQUES 

Singing Comedienne 

WILLIAM MOHRI8, Mgmnt 



(HAS. E. 



LILLY E. 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloquist and 

The Dancin* Doll 

In Europe for One Year. 
Playing Return Dates Everywhere 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. C. 
London, England. 

LINDSAY'S 

Dogs and Monkeys 

BURROWS-TRAVIS CO. 

in their up-to-the-minute Comedy Act, 



44 



ROOM 13 



lha's 



(TWO) 



Alice 



Shrodes 



RENTED 



A LICK 



II ATT IK 



THE FLOODS 



and Dog ' Trlxle." 
Novelty <;i<>ix> nnd I'nsupportt'd LadoVf Act. 



"SNITZ" MOORE 

Management D*VE KRAUS 

H. ELVIN MACK 

Comedian at 1 1 1 ks r t y for comodv or burlesque. 

119 I 14th Street- 



THE FAMOUS 

Colby Family 

Orpheum Circuit until June Oct. 1, 'OS, until 
April, 1 S07, booked solid. See Morris, S W. 
28th St., N. Y. City, or Wm. H. Colby, per route 



THE PLAYER 

Walter Daniels 

Impersonating the Celebrities. Maks-up snd 

changing all characters In full view of 

sudlenoe. Address 

SAM POSNER, St. Ja.mes Bid*. 





Joe, Myra, Buster and Jingles 

KEATO 

Eccentric Comedians 

Address THE MAN WITH THE TABLE. WIFE 
AND TWO KIDS. 229 West 38th Street. N. Y.. 
care of Ehrlch House. 

Peschkoff Troupe 

Russian National Dancers 

PITROT A QIRARD, Exclusive Agents 
1265 Broadway, New York 

JACK MASON 

Producer and Gen'l Stage Director 

Mgr. Five Society Belles 

Address care of STAIR A HAYLIN 

BROADWAY THEATRE BUILDING 

'THE NARROW FELLER." 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

"THE MAM FROM GEORGIA" 



CHERIDAH SIMPSON " v '. u . d ' 

"THE WIDOW" 

With "The Prince of Pilsen Cirls " 

ED. MARK DM Press Rep. 

Have Your Card in VARIETY 



24 



VARIETY 



NOTICE TO MANAGERS A1ND ARTISTS 



encv 



CLIFFORD 



FISCHER 



HOLLAND BUILDING 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Cable: "Control: New York 



M 



ion©: 3487 






The above agency, under management of CLIFFORD C. FISCHER, has been 
organized for the purpose of representing in America the principal variety agencies of Europe. 

It is not the intention to deal direct with the artist as such, but through his personal 
agent, as we will confine ourselves to being an Agents' Agency. 

Through our connections in Europe, we are in position to give managers the best possi- 
ble service in obtaining European acts. 

We have made arrangements with 

THOMPSON & DUNDY 

for the exclusive booking for their enterprises, with the provision that we never book an act 
direct— but engage only through the artist's booking representative. 



V 



HAMME&STEIN'S THEATRE 
ICTORIA VARIETIES 

Next Week \&SgZSL Mar. 12 

Prices, 25c, 50o, 75c & $1.00. Mat. Every Pay. 25c & 50c 
First Time at This Theatre, 

Mr. HENRI DeVRlES 

Europe's Greatest Character Actor, 

Presenting Ills Wonderful Protean Play, entitled 

"A CASE OF ARSON." 

Direct from the Hippodrome, 
MME. RENZ, 
Sensational Equestrian Spectacle. 

JAMES THORNTON, 

New and Original Monologue. 

CHAS. F. 8EM0N, 
Musical Comedian. 

JACOBS' DOGS. 
European Canine Wonders. 

TICE AND JERMON, 

Comedians. 

THE JOHNSONS, 
Dancers. 

HERBERT BROOKS, 
Original Trunk Mystery. 

MAT BELFORT, 

Comedienne. 

NEW VITAGRAPH VIEWS. 



PASTOR'S 

nth St.. near Third Ave. Continuous Performance. 

LAWRENCE A HARRINGTON. 

Trumhull A Barnes. Hathaway A Walton. 

Ceo. H. Diamond & Co. Herr Saona.- 

Miller Browning Co. Irene Lee. 

Acker & Cllday. Cunningham & Smith. 

Guy's Parlor Minstrels. Musical Brennans. 

World In earners. The Vita graph. 

And as an Added Attrsctlon, 

2 The Two Pucks 2 



A. H. WOODS 

Can use sister acts and sketch teams for 




GREATER N. Y. CIRCUIT 





8th AVE. w 
THE J 

UTOPIANS K 



I 




E 



BOWERY a 

n Sam :c 

S K DeveresCo. H 
The Original Horns of I / * " 

Amateur Nights I L 






A REQUEST. 

We respectfully request artists particu- 
larly, and every one generally, when respond- 
ing to advertisements appearing in TfikiETY 
to kindly mention this paper. 

Variety has more variety readers than 
any other publication. 

The advertisers in commercial lines 
do not appreciate this fact through the 
seemingly impossible success this paper has 
met with in a short time. 

In consequence replies without 
VARIETY specifically mentioned are cred- 
ited to older mediums. 



■ • ".# >ffri 



TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 




vol; ii., no. i. 



MARCH 17, 1906. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 




fjarSt Sf>'/*r /v. r? 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 1905, at the post office at New York, N. Y. t under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 






VARIETY 






AUSTIN FYNES IN RIGHT. 

The past week has been the answer to 
those who have been asking what J. Aus- 
tin Fynes intends to do. The answer is 
that he is President of the International 
Amusement and Realty Company and 
holds the same position in the Nicolet 
Amusement Company. 

The first is incorporated under the New 
York law with a capital of $100,000, and 
the Nicolet is placed at $50,000, both fully 
paid. 

As regards New York city Mr. Fynes 
will shortly hare the only "Fifth Avenue" 
theatre in town, for he is to build on the 
corner of Fifth avenue and 125th street, 
as has already been announced in Variety. 
Since Mr. Fynes purchased the site it has 
developed that on an adjoining corner one 
of the dry goods magnates will shortly 
erect a department store that will put 
other Harlem structures in the shade. 

In addition Meyer R. Bimberg has been 
flirting with the Fynes entourage, looking 
toward the acquirement of the Yorkville 
Theatre property, and there are two sites 
in Brooklyn already offered. 

That Mr. Fynes will have one house in 
Brooklyn is an assured fact; the second 
is a possibility. One of these houses is on 
Fulton street, the other is in the Eastern 
District, and not likely at this time to be 
connected with the plans. 

In Newark Mr. Fynes has a choice of 
several sites upon which to build. He was 
in charge of the building of the Proctor 
house in Newark and familiar with the 
peculiar building laws existing in that town. 
The laws are not as exacting as it is gen- 
erally supposed Jersey justice is, and be- 
fore long a site will be announced. In any 
event it will be near the center of the 
town, sufficiently close to the Proctor house 
to be in competition. The building will 
cost about $300,000 and will be put up by 
local capital. It will open in November 
unless there is an unexpected delay. 

The Jersey City house will be the first 
started, for Mr. Fynes will be in posses- 
sion on April 21 and will offer a show on 
April 23. He will be well established by the 
time Poll opens his projected house. 
Fynes* theatre is the Bijou, which was 
built in 1898 and has a seating capacity of 
1,800. T. W. Dinkins cannot change his 
house from burlesque until the end of the 
season, and Poll cannot break ground until 
long after Fynes has established himself. 

There are other houses in contemplation, 
but at the present time there is no definite 
prospect, although several out of town 
houses have been offered Mr. Fynes which 
have not yet been accepted. It may be 
said with positiveness that the extension 
will be toward the northeast, along the 
lines of Connecticut and Massachusetts 
rather than toward the west and south 
at present. 

Several other sites are in view, but It 
may be said with reasonable definiteness 
that these are the only ones to be immedi- 
ately worked up. 

The Nicolet Company will have a wider 
scope, for houses will be taken wherever a 
store may be had in a good locality. It is 
not intended that stores shall be transient 
sites. From two to five thousand dollars 
will be spent on the fronts, and it is in- 
tended to make these places a permanent 
Investment 

At one of the houses recently established 
five thousand persons were catered to 
in two days, and disinterested persons have 



declared that the investment will pay at 
least 100 per cent, weekly. 

As a part of Mr. Fynes* plan a booking 
agency will be established in the vicinity 
of the new booking centre at Broadway 
and Forty-second street. Here there will 
be established an office where Mr. Fynes 
will insist upon courtesy to the actors, 
squareness of dealing and a real business 
method, which has been lacking in other 
agencies and booking offices, but which has 
always been the real factor of Mr. Fynes* 
success, no matter what his connection. 

He will not confine bis booking arrange- 
ments to his own house, but will offer other 
managers the courtesies of his establish- 
ment, and several now booking through 
other sources have already begged the 
privilege of booking through this office. 

It will be in charge of a booking repre- 
sentative of recognized standing, and 
through this all engagements for the cir- 
cuit will be made. 

Mr. Fynes is at present largely inter- 
ested (to the extent of 100,000 shares) in 
the Certigue Gold Mining and Dredging 
Company. From assays or "washouts** 
made in the presence of a Variety re- 
porter, the property is one of the richest 
ever assayed, and at the current stock 
quotations is one of the most valuable as- 
sets in Colombia, South America. 

Mr. Fynes will give part of his attention 
to this, and the remainder to his circuit, of 
which the above is only the starter. With- 
in a few weeks he will have half a dozen 
houses not already listed. 



WHEELS WON'T MERGE. 

There was a meeting of the leading 
spirits of the Eastern and Western bur- 
lesque "wheels** at the Belle vue- Stratford 
Hotel, Philadelphia, Wednesday, when the 
subject under discussion was the possibil- 
ity of avoiding the present competition. 
The meeting brought no definite result 
and the conference will be renewed, at 
some time in the near future. 

On prominent manager said: "The 
meeting was for the purpose of trying 
to arrange some plan whereby the present 
ruinous fights, more particularly in the 
small towns, might be avoided. There 
was no proposition made for a merger, 
but the discussion was held to the possibil- 
ity of avoiding conflict in places not able 
to support more than one house as well 
as in certain of the cities which are fairly 
overrun with burlesque theatres. 

"There was much said but neither side 
was willing to concede much and while 
the conference will be renewed shortly, I 
do not believe that there will be any un- 
derstanding arrived at; certainly the situ- 
ation will not adjust itself in time for 
next season, and it would appear that it 
is to be a fight to the death." 

Many of the managers took advantage 
of the meeting to attend the McGovern- 
Nelson fight in the evening. 



JULES RUBY LOOKING UP. 

Activity marks the features of Jules 
Ruby nowadays when speaking of the 
acts, present and prospective, he has in 
mind. 

Some of those he states with a posi- 
tiveness are Joseph Santley and company, 
and Ed Rice's "Animated Corn Field/* 
Mr. Rice will have twelve people with an 
expensive setting. Mr. Santley was star 
of "From Rags to Riches" for two years. 



WILL HOMANS STICK? 

The announcement that George Homans 
will have the Herald Square Theatre after 
May 1 has had the wise ones guessing ever 
since the announcement was made. Lis- 
ten: 

The property was originally purchased 
by Johnson, who was connected with the 
first line of stage coaches in New York, 
the entire frontage costing him something 
like $40,000 for the block. The corner 
where the Herald Square now stands was 
made into an aquarium, being changed to 
a theatre by Hyde & Bebman and John 
W. Holmes, who subsequently sold out to 
the Hyde fc Behman interest for $6,500. 

In due course the sub-lease passed to 
Evans & Mann and later to the Shu- 
berts. When the latter were ousted by 
Klaw &, Erlanger they took out the en- 
tire furnishings of the house with the ex- 
ception of the drop curtain. 

Klaw & Erlanger, who were sub-lessees 
under Hyde & Behman, as were the 
Shuberts, refurnished the house. The 
lease is up in May. Hyde & Behman, 
Klaw & Erlanger and Charles Frohman 
are all said to have refused to renew the 
lease, which now stands at something 
like $50,000 a year. The Shuberts are 
said to have taken over the lease. From 
Homans the Klaw & Erlanger people 
may get $5,000 for the fixtures. They 
would require the Shuberts to pay four 
times that or expend $20,000 to refit the 
house. 

Query: Is Homans merely acting for 
the Shuberts? If he is Abe Erlanger 
thinks he is "wise." 



BIG THING FOR MARINELLI. 

H. B. Marinelli, the foreign agent, will 
place the entire new production at the 
Coliseum in London, when the "French 
Review*' is given there on April 16. 

Through an arrangement with Mr. Stoll, 
the manager of Moss & Stoll, Marinelli 
will supply everything from the book to 
the features. 

A great deal of dependence is placed 
upon the "Flying Rocking Girls," a new 
novelty for the halls, the girls in the act 
revolving rapidly in rocking chairs with- 
out support. 

This will be the first experiment of 
bringing the French reviews into England, 
and if successful at the Coliseum it is 
expected that New York will have a 
chance to look the play over after adapta- 
tion has been made. 



HENNESSY WITH MORRIS— 
PERHAPS. 

William Morris has made a proposition 
to D. F. Hennessy, now with the Keith 
Booking Agency, to leave his present posi- 
tion and join the Morris forces. Mr. 
Hennessy is considering it. 

The attitude of Mrs. Hennessy will have 
considerable weight in the decision. 

It is understood that if Hennessy ac- 
cepts he will go to Chicago to assist in 
the management of the proposed new 
Western branch of Morris' to be opened 
there in April. 



MOVING DAY FOR MORRIS. 

Thursday was a very busy day for Wil- 
liam Morris, and his office staff. During 
a heavy snowstorm the fixtures from his 
former offices were moved into the Hol- 
land Building at 1440 Broadway, where a 
great many floral wreaths awaited the 
coming of the head of the immense book- 
ing agency. 

Perhaps no floral offering was more ap- 
preciated by Mr. Morris than the bouquet 
of roses sent him by his two young chil- 
den. 

All the prominent managers and agents 
dropped in to say "Good luck" and Thurs- 
day was a holiday for vaudeville. 

Pitrot & Girard booked the first act 
through the new offices. 



WILL KEITH BUY THE ORPHEUM? 

A rather indefinable report wafted it- 
self up and down Broadway during the 
week to the effect that B. F. Keith had 
a definite proposition to submit to the 
heavier stockholders in the Orpheum The- 
atre Circuit Company of the West, pro- 
vided they would not openly announce al- 
legiance to the Keith Booking Agency. 

It is nothing more nor less than a propo- 
sition to buy the circuit. The probable 
price is estimated at about two million 
dollars. 

Keith is being driven to desperate 
straits to secure new houses and retain 
his prestige. The Orpheum circuit is be- 
tween several fires, and it had always 
been the policy of the Western crowd to 
remain neutral. The poirt is being 
reached rapidly when that will no longer 
be possible. Keith, with the assistance of 
E. F. Albee, his general manager, has fore- 
seen that condition, and this latest move 
is planned as an elaborate beginning of a 
scheme to extend the Keith time over the 
face of the map. 

If Keith purchases the Orpheum circuit 
he has no fear of Kohl & Castle in Chi- 
cago, Anderson in Cincinnati, Tate and 
Middleton in St. Louis, or Col. Hopkins 
in the South. Provided Kohl & Castle 
hold back, a Keith house will be placed in 
Chicago, giving a short jump from Cleve- 
land. 

Another report has it that Keith hat 
secured the Mozart circuit of cheeper 
houses in Pennsylvania. This is an ef- 
fort to drive the Sullivan-Considine people 
to cover. It is hoped by the Keith folk 
that through the Orpheum houses and 
those at present controlled, with those 
which msy be added, B. F. Keith will once 
again be looked up to in vaudeville. 



KARNO WINS. 

The proceedings brought by Fred Karno 
of London, through his representative now 
in America, Alf Reeves, to restrain Charles 
Frohman from placing Karno's production 
known as "The Mumming Birds" in a 
play Mr. Frohman had in mind has been 
decided in Karno's favor by the Supreme 
Court in this country. 



DAVE LEWIS ALONE. 

Thoroughly penitent, Dave Lewis, the 
German comedian, is going to discard his 
"girl act" and try to succeed in vaude- 
ville alone. Booking to be secured by M. 
S. Bentham. 



SLIVERS, PANT0MIMIST. 

Frank Oakley (Slivers), the clown, 
now playing at the Hippodrome, will leave 
that place as soon as a pantomimic sketch 
now being written for him is completed. 
Vaudeville is the future ground Mr. Oak- 
ley will cover, if bookings are obtained, 
which may be an easy matter after the 
name of the author is announced. 



V 






■—■I I 



VARIETY 






ftKIETY 

▲ Variety Paper fer Variety People. 

Published every Saturday by 

THE VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
1402 Broadway, New York City. 



8IME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 

Entered as second-class matter December 
'22, 1005, at the post office at New York, N. Y.. 
under the act of Congress of March 8, 1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Foreign 8 

Six and three months Id proportion. 
Single copies five cents. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent addreaa 
ur aa per route, aa desired. 

Copyright 1906 by Variety Publishing Co. 
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION. 



Vol. II. 



No. 1. 



VARIETY announces 'fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"AH the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. That's 
VARIETY. 

Harry Nash of the musical team of 
Rhys and Nash died at Burlington, Vt., 
March 5. 



Leona Thurber and her picks have 
been booked for thirty-eight weeks by M. 
S. Kent ham. 



Snitz Moore of the European Sensation 
Burlesquera intends to go into vaudeville 
next season. 



Burrows and Travis have gone South to 
fulfill a seven weeks contract over the 
Inter. -late circuit. 



The record for weekly receipts at the 
Alhamhra was broken last week when 
Henri De Vries played there. 



Mr. Ziegler, of the Doric Theatre in 
Yonkers, takes time to mention that he 
never "knocked" anything or anybody. 



Fred Hathaway, who lost his partner 
and wife, has secured Emma Siegel 
through the efforts of D. F. Hennessy of 
the Keith office. 

George Cohan organized a "23" club at a 
banquet given by him at the Hotel Astor 
last Saturday night, about thirty promi 
nent theatrical persons having been in 
vited. 




Max Hart, associated with Jack Levy, 
the vaudeville agent, has been apj>ointed 
manager of Levy's agency office. 



William Courtleigh will shortly add an- 
other character to "Under the Third De- 
gree," making eight in all that he will 
play during the course of the sketch. 



HaiTV and Kate Jackson, who have not 
appeared East in some years, are now on 
their way, opening April '1 at the Am- 
phion. Mr. Jackson is well known as a 
stage manager. During his stay around 
New York he will stage Charles J>eonard 
Fletcher's new sketch. "A Breeze from the 
West." 



Fat Hoonev canceled himself at Cook's 
Opera House at Rochester this week, 
claiming that he had difficulty in locating 
the type on the program announcing his 

presence. 



Salerno, the juggler, has been booked 
for the New York Roof this summer, to 
open not later than June 4. That is the 
probable date of the roof's opening. 



The opera house in Salem, Mass., will 
he conducted by Calm and Grant in con- 
junction with their New England circuit 
of combination houses. There is no vaude- 
ville theatre for Salem on the horizon at 
present. 



Jeanette Guichard, formerly leading lady 
with the Jolly Crass Widows, closed her 
engagement with that organization last 
Sunday night at the Alcazar Theatre, 
Brooklyn. Her home is in Chicago, 
whither she will go. 



1 nnes and Ryan, playing in St. Louis 
this week, are booked in the near future 
for a half dozen engagements in New 
York. After they have concluded this 
work thev will fulfill contracts for \jtn 
don and South Africa, hooked bv Sidney 
Havman of London. 

M. M. Theise's "Wine. Woman ami 
Song" played three performances last 
Friday in St. Louis. After the regular 
night performance at the Gayety Theatre 
Stage Manager Fredericks took the com 
pany to the Plncnix Club in an outlying 
district, where the extra show was given. 



Al Reeves' Burlesque Company played 
the largest Monday matinee of the season 
llms far at Cleveland this week. Mi. 
1 Jeeves played to $20,001), gross, in four . 
weeks at Pittsburg, (Cincinnati, New Or- 
leans and St. Louis, stopping over one 
week in each town. A couple of conven- 
tions helped some. 



Eddie Clark has issued the latest num- 
ber of his "Weekly Hash," telling about 
himself and his "six winning widows," be- 
sides other information of more or less 
relevance. On one point Eddie may con- 
gratulate himself that his press sheet is 
more thoroughly read than any of 
its predecessors or imitators. "(Jee, it 
must be grand to be voiir own exclusive 
editor." 



DeBiere the magician was closed at the 
Hanaa Theatre in Hamburg for refusing 
to discontinue Horace Goblin's trunk trick. 
If the American managers would "get the 
habit" thev would elevate themselves in 
the estimation of many artists who are 
now suffering from loose principled brother 
professionals. 

Carl C. Fischer, who has about the most 
comfortable offices for a vaudeville agent 
in the city, received the other day a lion 
skin rug which lately enclosed the body 
of one of Haverman's animals. It looked 
so good to Mr. Fischer that he removed it 
from the office to his home." 



Alex Steiner claims the credit for seciir 
ing Frank Kilhurst the position as mana- 
ger of the Williams Orpheum. Steiner 
adds that if he procures another position 
for D. F. Hennessy Keith will be without 
a commissioner, but all of that joke doe-; 
not belong to Steiner. 



Capt. George Auger, last summer with 
the Barnum-Bailey circus, has Jwen plaj - 
ing the Interstate circuit for his first 
tour of the varieties. He expects to ap 
j>car in the East in his sketch "Jack the 
Giant Killer." Auger is well built for the 
title role, extending eight feet in the air, 
and weighing .304 pounds. The Captain 
will have two midgets for show purposes, 
and says he received the ranking name 
from King -Edward VII. 



A. r. (lillighan of Pittsburg journeyed 
nil the way to Grand Kapids, Mich., where 
he discovered an empty store. It looked 
so good to the Pennsylvanian thai he will 
convert it into a theatre and allow the 
people from all over to inspect the inside 
iifter it is finished and hear some vaude 
\ille besides for ten cents each, paid in 
advance. 



Win. L. Lykens. the agent, left a week 
a<:o Friday to attend the burial of his 
grandmother at St. Joseph, Mo. Mr. Ly- 
kens was badly broken up over the sad 
event, having lost both his parents at a 
too early age to recollect them, and had 
always looked upon his grandmother as 
Uis mother, 



VARIETY 






Why the Vaudeville Artists 

of America Should Organize 



BY SIME. 



Contracts enter largely into the ques- 
tion of organization. At present the bur- 
den of this matter is on the managers. 
With two or three exceptions they have 
no regard whatsoever for their written sig- 
nature engaging an artist for a stated 
period, and contracts in this country to- 
day amount to no more than so much 
waste paper. 

No artist expecting future engagements 
gives any thought to enforcing a written 
agreement, and if canceled or "switched," 
even though without his previous knowl- 
edge or consent, accepts the condition as 
inevitable, and while some mental swtir- 
ing may be indulged in, no further at- 
tention is given. 

The artists are accused by managers of 
not having any too great a regard for 
the papers they sign. The foundation of 
vaudeville existence for the artists should 
be built on contracts. In no other line of 
business are they so carelessly dis- 
regarded. 

Managers who enter into contracts 
should be compelled to carry them out. 
It would eventually lead the managerial 
end of the business into making no con- 
tract where any doubt existed as to its 
fulfillment, and the artist would know the 
exact condition of his affairs, present and 
future, covering the period contracted for. 

An act nowadays may be given time for 
an extended period. If a new act some 
further expense may be gone to by reason 
of that, but if the manager deems it ad- 
visable for any reason to cancel, he does 
so, and is indifferent whether his signature 
is still outstanding. 

With a proper organization this could 
be remedied, not especially by law or 
threats, but by having the name of any 
manager failing to carry out a written 
agreement, and who refused to arbitrate 
the matter, posted in the lodge rooms or 
publicly announced, with some provision 
made for a penalty to be enforced in that 
event, either by the organization, its mem- 
bers as a whole or the injured artist. 

A proper and equitable form of agree- 
ment could be drawn up, affording some 
protection to the artists, and being equi- 
table could not be objected to by a fair 
minded manager. 

The present contracts amount to so 
much data or memoranda of where the 
artist is expected to appear. No artist 
eares to bring suit on any ground, for he 
would stand alone. With an organization 
behind him he would have the moral if 
not the legal support of numbers, and 
might have the legal rlso if steps were 
taken to cover that point. 

A provision might be made for penal- 
izing any member of the organization who 
broke or attempted to nullify i contract 
without justifiable cause. This would 
give the managers confidence that their 
bills would appear complete on the ap- 
pointed day unless for some unavoidable 
reason. 

An organization of vaudeville artists 
would protect them from one another. 
"Copy acts" holding a membership should 
be required to explain if complaint was 



laid before the lodge by the origina- 
tors. Actors would be more discreet in 
the matter of purloining what cost some 
one else ^he labor -of his mind or his 
money. 

A proper organization including the art- 
ists without regard to relative rank, 
either in standing among the other pro- 
fessionals or in amount of weekly salary, 
would leave so few outside who could use 
other acts in any form that this might 
prove to be the solution of the annoy- 
ance through fear of theft which follows 
any new idea produced in vaudeville. 

With a solid organization the artists 
would be elevated in their own opinion 
and in that of others. They would meet in 
conclave and discuss their mutual inter- 
ests. It would be educative as well as pro- 
tective. Provision for sickness, death 
and old age could be provided. Only 
recently Ifanny Beane was committed to 
the work house, she being ineligible to en- 
ter the Actors' Home because of the age 
limit set for such entrance. 

Vaudeville artists are sufficiently numer- 
ous and their services bring remunerative 
enough returns to provide for themselves 
in the event of any unforeseen contingency 
arising, without depending upon any or- 
der controlled by any other persons than 
vaudevillians. 

There is a great deal of doubt expressed 
as to the practicability of the artists in 
America organizing. They are travel- 
ling constantly, few in comparison to the 
total being together at any one time. 

Were the artists thoroughly in accord 
on the question of organization this diffi- 
culty might be easily overcome. 

The same argument against organ- 
ization has been set up previous to the 
combining of performers in other coun- 
tries, where flourishing artists' societies 
now prevail. 

England and Germany have success- 
fully done this. In Germany the head- 
quarters of the International Artisten 
Loge is in Berlin. This organization was 
brought about under adverse circum- 
stances and the initial meeting was at- 
tempted in the face of apparently impos- 
sible obstacles. 

A few artists met, however, and formed 
the nucleus of an organization which has 
developed into one of immense power in 
its home country and those immediately 
adjoining, while a branch has been in- 
stalled in London, where two English so- 
cieties for music hall artists were already 
in existence. 

Tn the next issue the principles, aims, 
objects and attainments of the I. A. L. 
will be set forth. Taking that society as 
an example, with its experience, it is the 
most probable pattern for the American 
artists to follow. 



A FEMALE PROTEAN ARTIST. 

On Monday, at Young's Pier, Atlantic 
City, will be produced what is said to be 
♦ lie first protean act in vaudeville where 
the characters are taken by a woman. 

There will he seven in all, and Char 
lotte Parry will impersonate them. 



NICKEL VAUDEVILLE. 

Vaudeville on the instalment plan at 
fifteen minutes for five cents is the natural 
outcome of the Penny Arcade. Several 
such places have been opened recently 
along the main thoroughfares, one of them 
being in East Fourteenth street just across 
from Tammany Hall. 

It is a converted store, having lately 
been occupied by a museum of anatomy, 
which fact provides them with a more 
pretentious front than most of such places, 
since it is not the policy to lay out much 
money for frontages. 

There is a box office between the en- 
trance and exit, the top of which serves 
as a platform for the lantern operator. 
At the far end are a screen and a piano. 
Between the two are 122 seats, which 
makes the capacity $6. 1 0, not including a 
limited amount of standing room. The bill 
the other afternoon consisted of two short 
films, a chase picture, one verse of a song 
sung by a man provided by the publisher, 
(who also provided the slides for its il- 
lustration with his nanre in large letters), 
three more films and the announcement 
that the bill would change every half 
week. 

Several managers who went in out of 
curiosity figure that the idea would pay 
from $100 to $200 weekly clear profit. 



LOUIS ROBIE RECOVERING. 

St. Louis, March 10. 
Although at one time considered beyond 
reach of medical aid, Louis Robie, the bur- 
lesque manager, is recovering at the Hotel 
Kozier here, and will, it is expected, be 
able to attend to business within a month. 
Meanwhile his son Joseph is in charge of 
affairs. 



KILHURST ESCAPES. 

Frank Kilhurst, treasurer of the Keith 
Booking Agency, nee The Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Association, left that concern last 
Saturday and immediately attached him- 
self to Percy Williams' staff as business 
manager of the Orpheum. John J. Ma- 
loney, his predecessor, becomes assistant 
business manager of the Williams enter- 
prises. 

A growing dissatisfaction with affairs 
culminated last Thursday when Mr. Kil- 
hurst had an interview with Mr. Williams, 
as a result of which his resignation was 
tendered on Friday and accepted by Mr. 
A I bee on Saturday on his return from the 
West. He assumed his new position on 
the following day, which is "going some." 

Mr. Kilhurst properly spells his name 
Kilholz, accepting the more familiar spell- 
ing at the suggestion of the late Louis 
Behman because of the difficulty his as- 
sociates had in pronouncing the same. He 
will resume the old spelling. He was a 
member of the Hyde & Behman forces for 
years as house and road manager, and 
took the position with the old association 
at Mr. Behman's request. 



ZANCIGS TO DANCE. 

Before leaving for an extended tour of 
the West the Zancigs are going to have a 
farewell party at their handsome apart- 
ments at 45 West Thirtieth street on 
Saturday. March 31. It is to be a barn 
dance and all the guests are requested 
to appear in rural costume. 



The stage crew at the New York The- 
atre are now wearing what were once 
white uniforms. 



ALHAMBRA. 

A certain colored brother named John- 
son not long since won passing notice with 
a negro sketch called "The Evolution of 
the Negro." Now this colored brother was 
said to have been the original Johnson of 
Cole and Johnson, and the sketch an- 
nounced itself as "real coon." At the Al- 
hambra this week Cole and Johnson are 
on the bill. They play real coon, too. But 
instead of being the traditional sort of 
Southern negro they play the Northern 
kind, the Pullman porter kind that wears 
yellow spats and smokes Turkish cigar- 
ettes. It shows just as accurate a type of 
negro as the cotton-picking variety, but 
white audiences may perhaps find the criti- 
cism that it's too polite. The palpable de- 
sire of the pair to be accepted as polite 
dress coat entertainers is about the only 
fault to be found with the sketch. Both men 
sing well, one of them dances well and the 
other plays the piano with considerable 
skill. The time is not yet come, however, 
when the African can compete with the 
white division of the profession as serious 
entertainers. 

Of the many Southern war playlets that 
of Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Crane is one of 
the best. There are no jarring rough 
nesses in it and it contaius no cheap appeal 
to vaudeville patriotism as many acts of 
the sort do. Mrs. Crane makes a charm- 
ing Southern girl and handles her comed.v 
with considerable delicacy. The scene of 
her conversation with the Yankee officer 
while she wears the brother's Confederate 
uniform is perhaps developed at too great 
length, but the story is well and strongly 
told and the climax is satisfactory. 

"The Awakening of the Toys" is a de- 
lightful offering by DeWitt, Burns and 
Torrance which takes its interest more 
from the dressing and construction than 
from the actual substance of the turn. 
Ground tumbling which is simple but novel 
and remarkably catching is the base of the 
sketch. Frank DeWitt and Charles Burns 
are the principals in this. Miss Madge Tor- 
rance 'just looks pretty in white and does a 
rather inferior dance. 

The Empire City Quartet hold their act 
almost without change since they first came 
together in vaudeville. They have demon- 
strated for all time and all quartets the 
wisdom of putting the soft pedal on knock- 
about comedy and making their act one 
of real musical worth. 

Charles E. Evans seemed to hit a re- 
sponsive strain in Harlem audiences with 
the swift moving complications of "It's Up 
to You, William." The sketch is pretty 
frankly farcical but contains a fairly high 
percentage of laughs. 

"Minnie From Minnesota," the offering 
of Mr. and Mrs. Allison, is entirely inno- 
cent of any semblance of construction, hav- 
ing apparently been made up in rehearsal 
of Mrs. Allison's eccentric makeup as a 
Swedish girl, a dash of broad burlesque 
and a certain amount of casual rehearsal. 
It contains plenty of comedy of its sort, 
however, and won a fair amount of 
laughter. 

Among the others were the MeGraths in 
spectacular but unmusical banjo juggling; 
Melville and Stetson in songs and bur- 
lesque impersonations, of which that of 
Maggie Cline was the best, and the Glin- 
seretti Troupe of European acrobats. 



Jean Schwartz, the composer, came back 
to town .last Sunday, his bride arriving 
the next day. 



■■■ 



,, 



VARIETY 



SULLIVAN-CONSIDINE RETAINS 
LYRIC. 

Cleveland, March 16. 

Verification of the report that the 
Lytic Theatre in this city will shortly 
be on the market can not be obtained. 

The Sullivan-Considine combination con- 
trols the present lease, and raised the 
prices of admission on March 5, the busi- 
ness warranting that being done. 

It is improbable that they will lose the 
Iioiim. 



"LEARNED ENTERTAINERS." 



For the opening of the Herald Square 
Theatre George Homans announces that 
lie has obtained the services of the 
Ttehinn Mali troupe of nine Chinese con- 
jurers who have been playing the Con- 
tinent and England of late. They are said 
to be far superior to Ching Ling Foo. 

The title is the Chinese equivalent of 
"learned entertainers" and several of the 
troupe are said to be much above the 
coolies who usually form these troupes. 
It will be recalled that Ching Ling Foo 
was a high caste Chinaman, though his 
comedian was a coolie. 

There are three comedians with the new 
troupe. 



NEW ORPHEUM STAGE MANAGER. 

John D. Hall, for some time stage man- 
ager of the Amphion Theatre, has accepted 
a similar position with the Orpheum and 
is now in charge of that stage. 



WHO? 

It is said that during the recent Proctor 

shakcups there was one resident manager 
who sustained a material cut in his salary. 
You are allowed five guesses since there 
are five resident managers. 



HAD A BITE. 

Sam Watson and his farmyard are 
features at Hyde & Beh man's this week. 
One of the features of the act is a small 
donkey trained to nip his master's clothes. 
The "moke" apparently felt the need of 
rehearsal Wedncsdav afternoon, and Wat- 
son not being about he nipped the calf of 
the small darky boy with Burke and La- 
Uue. He was coaxed to let go and the 
boy's leg was cauterized. It did not in- 
terfere with his dancing at the evening 
performance but the mule looked pale. 



WILSON'S NEW OPERA. 

Francis Wilson, the comic opera co- 
median, has written the book for a comic 
opera which will be presented in town 
this summer under the management of 
Charles Frohman. It will be named 
"Little Sally Waters." Mr. Wilson will 
not appear in it. 

Will D. Cobb has been commissioned to 
write the lyrics and Henry Frantzen will 
compose the music. 



GUERRERO TO RETURN. 

The Spanish dancer and pantomimLst, 
Kosario Guerrero, will be brought back to 
the United States for next season by If. S. 
Bentham. The Castilian woman will have 
a new pantomime, with twelve girls and 
Philip Dufande, who appeared with her 
when last she played here. 

Six of the girls will give a real Spanish 
dance, while the others will assist in the 
pantomime. Mile. Guerrero is now at 
Boulogne, France. 



LAVINIA SHANNON ONCE MORE. 

Cincinnati, March 16. 
The late leading lady of the Forepaugh 
stock company, Lavinia Shannon, will ap- 
pear at the Columbia Theatre here for 
the first time in a sketch called "The 
Matinee Girl," on March 25. Miss Shan- 
non, it will be remembered, dropped into 
vaudeville for a few minutes once before. 



ARCHIE ELLIS ILL. 

Archie Ellis, manager of the Star The- 
atre in Brookln, has been confined to his 
home with a cold contracted at his 
brother's funeral two weeks ago. His ill- 
ness is not serious. Nick Norton, of Hyde 
& Behman's Adams street house, has 
been keeping an eye on the Star mean- 
while. 



N. Y. ROOF STILL DOUBTFUL. 

It is not finally settled who will have 
the management of the New York Theatre 
Hoof for the coming summer. Although 
William A. Brady has been supposed to" 
have secured the lease, contracts for vaude- 
ville artists to appear there have been 
contracted for in the name of Louis F. 
W T erba. 

Whether Mr. Werba is empowered to 
contract for the New York Theatre Roof 
or the Aerial Gardens atop the New Am- 
sterdam Theatre is not publicly stated, 
but Mr. Werba is proceeding with his 
bookings for the several roofs in a manner 
to indicate that the final lease for the New 
York Theatre this summer has not as yet 



RADHA QUITS. 

The dancing act known as Radha will 
not play next week for Proctor, the dancer, 
Miss Ruth Denney, having had an engage- 
ment for a pink "tea, ami Mr. Proctor de- 
clining to release the young woman for 
that afternoon. 

The act ha* had a precarious existence. 
It played the Twenty-third Street Theatre 
for three consecutive weeks, the last of 
which the name did not appear on the pro- 
gram. It is understood the second week 
was paid for by half the original salary, 
and for the third week the management 
of the dancer received nothing. 

While playing Twenty-third Street the 
first engagement about twenty-five "cap- 




WAIT!! 



been finally disposed of, all reports to the 
contrary notwithstanding. 

Rumor has it that Mr. Werba and pos- 
sible Mr. Mark Luescher will have an in- 
terest in the New York this season. 



RED HOT IN THE WEST. 

The latest theatre in the West to be 
acquired by the William Morris office for 
booking purposes is the Lafayette in De- 
troit, under the management of Doc Camp- 
bell. 

The theatre will be turned over for 
vaudeville and will be booked by William 
Morris. 

This seems in direct retaliation for the 
B. F. Keith booking agency securing the 
Valentine Theatre in Toledo against H. 
II. Lamkin's Arcade in that city and indi- 
cates to what extreme the present struggle 
in the West for supremacy among the 
vaudeville managers and agents will be 
carried. 



pers" were carried. They would rush up 
to the doorman, asking "What time does 
Radha appear?" 

The doorman reported the many inquir- 
ies, and the Proctor management thought 
it had a "find" until the ticket taker 
marked the resemblance of the inquirers. 



ARTHUR FIGGIS VISITING HERE. 

Arthur Figgis, who was manager of the 
Moss & Stoll Empire Theatre in Dublin 
for seven years, is in New York. He may 
permanently locate here. 



IS LEO FEIST IN THIS? 

There is going to be a chain of "Fam- 
ily" theatres opened in Pennsylvania soon 
by Sam Meyers, who is a brother-in-law 
of Ix;o Feist, the music publisher. 

The first to open will be at East on on 
Monday. More will follow according to 
Mr. Meyers, but he does not say where or 
when. 



HIATT'fc NEW ACT. 

Dan lliatt is developing a new offering 
termed a musical extravaganza, entitled 
"Out of the Dragon's Mouth," with eight 
people, at an estimated cost of $1,500. 
Jules Ruby may handle the bookings. 



"THE VARIETY GIRLS." 

A "girl act'' carrying ten young females 
will have its fir*t showing to-morrow at 
the Yorkville Theatre under the direction 
of Myers & Keller. It will be called "The 
Variety (Jirls." 



STEP UP AND PAY. 

The new Commissioner of Licenses has 
forwarded notice to all theatrical agents 
that the fee and bond must be deposited 
with him by May 1, next, if they wish to 
continue business. 

The license fee is $25 yearly. The bond 
required is $1,000. 



EVANS IN "THERE AND BACEL" 

M. S. Bentham is going to remove 
Charles E. Evans from the vaudeville spot- 
light, placing him in the legitimate again 
with "There and Back," a piece in which 
Mr. Evans has already starred, and a 
condensed version of which he is now 
using in the varieties. 



CLINT WILSON WITH THE SHU- 
BERTS. 

Clinton Wilson, the agent, closed con- 
tracts with the Shuberts to take charge of 
the hitter's houses in Brooklyn and New- 
ark on Sundays, when vaudeville enter- 
tainments under the guise of "concerts" 
will be given. The opening day for both 
houses will be March 25. There may be 
a change in plans before that date, but 
Mr. Wilson will not be affected. 



SHOULD BE A THRILLER. 

Through Charles Bornhaupt, the foreign 
agent, The (ireat Albas, as he is termed, 
will arrive here in time to play summer 
engagements by sliding down a high wire 
on his head without any support whatso- 
ever. 

If the performance bears out Mr. Born- 
haupt's description there will be consider- 
able talk in the suburbs. 



THIRTY-THREE WITH ROBINSON. 

Doc Waddell is the historian of the 
John Robinson shows last season and his 
route book, "Looking backward thirty- 
three weeks with a circus," is one of 
those volumes that will be treasured by 
the performer's grandchildren. It is a 
pretentious volume of more than 150 pages 
and tells the complete story of the last 
Robinson tour in addition to offering 
other readable matter. 



STERN UP AGAINST IT. 

Before Judge Leventritt in the Supreme 
Court Thursday Shep Edmunds sued J. 
VV. Stern & Co. for an accounting on the 
song "You Can't Fool All of the People 
All the Time." 

Stern was willing to admit a sale of 
2,400 copies, but Edmunds, through his at- 
torney, William Crossman, refused to ac- 
cept these figures, and a commission will 
be appointed to determine, by the books 
and otherwise, what the actual sales were. 

The defendants put in a counter claim 
of breach of contract but this was dis- 
missed and the case will stand as decided. 
There will be others who will be glad to 
see the Stern accounts. 



ENTIRELY NEW FOR ROLAND WEST. 

In the midst of the many protean 
sketches and acts now given and to be pre- 
sented to vaudeville Roland West arises 
from the shadow of an Kmmett Corrigan 
sketch to announce that !i<- will appear in 
a protean dramatic production under the 
management, of Myers & Killer, enlisting 
-even characters, :ill of which he will 
portray. 



TTT 
? 1 



T 



VARIETY 




Fred Walton & Co. 
"Cissie's Dream." 
Twenty-third Street. 

Easily the best capture for vaudeville 
of the present season is Fred Walton, late 
of the "Babes and the Baron" company, 
who presented for the first time here the 
music hall pantomime the greater part of 
which' was used in the play in which he 
last appeared. Cissie is a youngster who 
has crept out of bed to play with her toys 
after the nurse has left. She is discovered 
by that young woman, who promptly pups 
her back into bed and sings a lullaby in 
a voice that would put even a prize 
lighter to sleep. There is a dark change 
to an enlarged setting of the toy cupboard. 
The toy grocery has become a real af- 
fair and the toys are replaced by humans. 
Of course the toy soldier is the central fig- 
ure of a number of sensational episodes 
which terminate in a due! which so 
frightens the child that she cries out in 
alarm and is reassured only after the 
nurse had lifted her up from her bed to 
show the toys still in the cupboard. Mr. 
Walton's pantomine bits include his first 
entrance in the deceased spectacle, the hat 
scene, the medal scene and other bits, in- 
cluding a dance which shows him to be a 
most graceful performer. With the in- 
terest centered in his work the various bits 
are shown to better advantage and for 
twentv-seven minutes he held the audi- 
ence absolutely. He is a rarely good pan- 
tomimfst and the clearness of his work 
exempts it from the usual prejudice ex- 
isting here against dumb acting. To make 
a bull, Mr. Walton may be said to speak 
in silence. He had able assistance from 
Hattie Burdell, William Phinney and 
Louis Christy as dolls, and Clara Mesereau 
and Harriette Jenkins as the real folk. 
All the scenery and properties were new 
and are carried for the act. Mr. Walton 
was forced to respond to several calls that 
came from the audience and not alone 
from his friends. Chicot. 




Junie McCree & Co. 
"The Man from Denver." 
Fifty-eighth Street. 

Mr. McCree is back in vaudeville with 
a sketch and a cast listing three names 
besides his own. No author is given, but 
the sketch was well liked at Proctor's 
Fifty-eighth Street house, where the slang 
of McCree is too "real" for the audience, 
which prefers the broad sort of the Leslie 
and Dailey brand. Harriet Ross and Zella 
Frank play an adventuress and maid re- 
spectively, while John P. Wade takes 
capital care of the victimized lover part. 
Mr. McCree gives an enjoyable perform- 
ance, the lines are bright, while the story 
is tersely told and easily understandable. 

Siimc. 



May Boley. 

"The Village Cut-Ups." 

Imperial. 

Miss Boley is giving much the same act 
in vaudeville as constituted the burden of 
her labor in "The Maid and the Mummy.'" 
She gave the "Village Cut-Ups" number 
one Sunday night at the New York The- 
atre during the run of the play, and that 
decided her vaudeville career. Surrounded 
by six girls and two men, Miss Boley has 
virtually a "girl act." The "Cut-Ups" es- 
tablish her as a vaudeville favorite, and it 
is Mirs Bolev's individual efforts that ob- 
tain the applause, although the girls arc 




AGTS OP THE WEEK) 



Hathaway does enough dancing for two 
and pulls the act up to a point that will 
probably save his dates. Chicof. 



well made up for the country bumpkin 
parts. The chorus of the opening song is 
repeated on the very slightest pretext, 
that becoming necessary to lengthen out 
the act, while during the change of cos- 
tume made by the women Jafties H. Har- 
rington does "Music and Pantomime" for 
about three minutes. It is about three 
minutes too long, but as something is re- 
quired Mi*. Harrington has been selected. - 
The aid of a bellows to enable the playing 
of a trombone may be considered positive 
proof of Harrington's originality. The 
act is prettily costumed, with fair looking 
girls inside the dresses. Another opening 
number allowing every one more scope 
could be added without fear of any harm- 
ful results. Sime. 




Frank Lynne. 
Monologue. 
Twenty-third Street. 

Said to be one of England's foremost 
writers of music hall stuff, Mr. Lynne 
scarcely convinced the man from Missouri. 
He made his appearance in a green suit 
and began an harangue to the effect that 
the American actor In England had small 
trouble in entertaining his audiences, con- 
trary to the general belief that American 
humor was too subtle for the English. 
He hoped that he would have an equally 
pleasant report to make to his country- 
men on the American appreciation of Eng- 
lish humor. Having thus made his kind 
applause arrangement, Mr. Lynne pro- 
ceeded to sing some songs with limitless 
"patter" in between, most of which was 
of American origin made very English by 
the rewriter. His one real laugh came 
with a very broad line on a delicate sub- 
ject. For the rest the most that may be 
said is that he worked very hnrd to score 
an effect. His first song was a relation of 
the queer questions a small hoy is capable 
of asking. His others were equally an- 
cient in idea. He had nothing to offer 
that was not intolerably old. Chicot. 



■ 



V 



Timothy J. Cronin. 

"Sheridan's Ride to Winchester.' 

Hurtig & Seamon's. 

Mr. Cronin is not the Tim Cronin of 
some renown, but according to the pro- 
gram was a member of the late Augustin 
Daly Company. It is also said that he 
was a member of the vaudeville team of 
Scanlon and Cronin some years ago. A 
protean sketch by James Conner Roach is 
the cause of Mr. Cronin '■ appearance at 
Hurtig & Seamon's this week, he as- 
saying six characters, a nurse being 
played in a silent and unobtrusive man- 
ner by a young woman who is given no 
credit nor does she deserve any. Cronin 
is not entitled to any praise for his per- 
formance excepting that which accrues to 
any person making a sincere effort. But 
in the parlance of the profession Cronin is 
in wrong." Sime. 



<< 




"The Crickets." 

Girl Act. 

Hurtig & Seamon's. 

Carry i ng eleven persons, of which two 
are female principals and one an un- 
announced male, the act makes a bid for 
approval through introducing the girls 
dressed up to represent crickets, with 



Florence Saunders as the leader. There is 
a (ieisha number, and a drill in white 
uniforms by the girls completes the en- 
tertainment. During the changes two 
solos are sung, one by Miss Saunders, a 
quite pretty girl with a fair soprano voice, 
and the other by the man, who has all 
the earmarks of an amateur. The light 
effects are poorly taken care of, and the 
only effective!. part of the performance is 
the Japanese dressing, with a melodious 
selection. The girls have knapsacks with 
batteries in the drill, and the names of 
famous Americans are spelled out in the 
marches while the likenesses are thrown 
upon a screen. It is a "holdup" for ap- 
plause of the very broadest nature, the 
finale being spelled out as 'Our Teddy," 
but it fails to score. The girls are not 
given sufficient opportunity for liveliness, 
and the electrical effects are partly spoiled 
through the stage not being darkened. 
The special drops are not expensive or 
showy; neither are the white cotton tights 
worn in the finale. The act is under the 
management of George R. Wilson. En- 
cores were taken without the approval of 
the audience, and the act escaped a veri- 
table frost by a narrow margin. 

Sime. 




Miller-Browning Co. 

"Caught." 

Pastor's. 

Three persons appear in a rather lu- 
gubrious dramatic sketch telling the story 
of a young man turned burglar through 
force of circumstances. He is caught by 
the servant girl in a house he has in 
tended to rob and the girl proves to be his 
sweetheart. She has a policeman visiting 
her who breaks in upon the pair and dis- 
covers the burglar to be his brother, a 
fact the girl has sought to keep from him. 
There are plentiful promises of penitence 
and the policeman lets him off to marry 
the girl to provide the necessary happy 
ending. The story is not well told and 
the acting average is low. The police- 
man is ponderous in style and his eyes 
are so heavily made up that his appear- 
ance is ludicrous. He should play his 
part with a lighter touch. The girl 
is too hysterical in her methods at times 
when hysteria is not called for, and the 
burglarious youngster is too sullen to 
win the sympathy of the audience. 

Chicot. 




Hathaway and Siegel. 

Dancers. 

Pastor's. 

New only in the sense that Emma 
Siegel replaces the errant half of Hath- 
awav and Walton, the new combination 
shows two grave faults. Miss Siegel is 
|>ermitted to sing and also to tell stories 
that her grandmother's grandmother told 
her grandmother and her grandmother told 
her. Now she is trying to get square by 
telling the audience, unless she has been 
checked already. The story of the angels 
that bit the innocent child was put in 
camphor long ago. Miss Siegel has too 
much the appearance of a club performer. 
With smart dressing and her teeth firmly 
fastened together she would get through, 
for she dances fairly and looks well. 




Four Carrolls. 

Risley Act. 

New York Theatre. 

One of the former members of the Todd- 
Judge family is the head of the act, which 
resembles the other closely in the work 
and exactly in the finale. Two young boys 
are employed, one dressed in a comical 
style, but he is neither a comedian nor 
gives any evidence that he ever will be, 
Evening dress is worn, and the rosin on the 
soles of the shoes show plainly the impact 
on the black clothes of the boys. Those 
in front not understanding the cause natu 
rallv think the man's shoes are dust v. 
Neat white suits or tights would be in 
letter taste. Regulation risley tricks arc 
given, with a single turn from the soles 
landing again in an upright position as the 
l>est. Sime. 



Adams and Mack. 

Magic. 

New York Theatre. 

Adams and Mack in magic, burlesque 
and otherwise, appeared at the New York 
Theatre last Sunday evening for the first 
time together in town. One attempts 
mystifying tricks and illusions straight, 
while the other is supposed by his make 
up to have been intended for a comedian. 
The sleight-of-hand is very poorly exe- 
cuted, the only really good trick, of palm 
ing cards, being smothered by the poor 
comedv of the comedian used in connee- 
Hon. The one disappearing illusion 
(Horace Goldin's) is so plainly evident to 
the audience that the climax of the co- 
median appearing in the back of the house 
after having left the cabinet behind the 
wing is guessed at before the trick fairly 
gets started. Goldin's goldfish is another 
in use and the finale is a silly burlesque 
of this. The act is far from even fair, 
and more deftness must be acquired; also 
some comedy which deserves the name. 

Sime. 




Laura Bennett & Co. 
Comedy Sketch. 
Novelty. 

The sketch is plainly written around 
Miss Bennett's abilitv as a blacfacc 
comedian. In so far as she is concerned 
it goes well and scores reasonablv, but 
there enters a villain in the person of 
Arthur E. Sprague, a grasping landlord, 
who immediately and conclusively queers 
the sketch. He plays the part of the land- 
lord in exactly the spirit and method-; 
that might be properly expected of a 
hlood-drinking demon at the Third Avenue 
Theatre in one of Theodore Kremer's 
worst. 

He performs more scowls, growls deeper 
in his throat, and makes his eyes glitter 
more wickedly in driving the struggling 
young painter (Miss Rose Marston) from 
her expensive apartments than if he were 
cutting the throat of the chee-i-ld in the 
third act of a wild and woolly melodrama. 

Miss Bennett works in a song and a 
negro dance that go nicely and . with a 
little brushing up in the act and the sup 
pression of the too villainous villain, the 
sketch can be made a fairly acceptable 
one for the houses of the Novelty class. 

Coke. 



VARIETY 



OUT OF TOWN 




ARTISTS' FORUM 



Chriaty. 

Juggling. 

Gayety, St. Louis. 

A really thrilling thriller in the way of 
a comedy juggling act was presented at 
the Gayety this week by Christy, "the 
tramp juggler," who formerly was in a 
team act under the title of Christy and 
Willis. Christy tossed about such objects 
as an umbrella, silk hat, a lighted cigar, 
and rubber balls, showing dexterity and 
agility. While he is performing he keeps 
up a line of conversation that amuses the 
audience. In this he could easily make 
good as a monologist of the "two-a-day" 
sort. No act seen here this season scored 
as big. He is engaged to play out the 
balance of the season with the Knicker- 
bockers Burlesque Company, after which 
he will seek laurels in straight vaudeville. 

Joe Pazcn. 



— 



. 



Dean Edsall & Co. 
"Dad's Boy." 
Poli's, Hartford. 

A pleasing playlet by Arthur Forbes and 
Miss Dean Edsall had its initial perform- 
ance here this week. It is a pretty little 
Irish sketch with a dainty love story clev- 
erly presented, with touches of humor and 
pathos here and there. Miss Edsall takes 
the part of a boy dressed in knickerbockers 
in a very pleasing manner. The sketch 
closed with a very clever fencing scene, 
which was staged by Fred Gilbert Blakes- 
lee. William II. Rhodes. 



Francis Owens, Minnie Hoffman and Co. 
"The Benediction." \ 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Tsing the theme of a wife's duty to her 
husband, no matter what the circum- 
stance, Mr. Owens has built a rather 
dainty sketch in his act called "The Bene- 
diction." The story is that of an old man, 
a war veteran, who is disliked by his son- 
in law because of his alleged drinking and 
swearing before the children of the man. 
lie is ordered from the house and finds 
shelter in the homes of the children of 
the neighborhood, to whom he has been 
kind. The character work of Mr. Owens 
as the old soldier is splendid, for with 
the possible exception of being a bit too 
spry for an aged man, he renders his 
lines^with good effect. The work of Min- 
nie Hoffman as Mrs. Strong, his daughter, 
and Henry Duggan as Joe Manley is also 
good, as is the work of Joseph Stanhope in 
the role of the disagreeable husband and 
father. 

The act is one which will appeal to the 
refined and educated audiences ami is a 
bright spot of relief in the daya of slap- 
sticks and horseplay, It will make good. 

Arthur II. McKechnic, 

KEITH LOST THE EMPIRE. 

When B. F. Keith made his lust trip 
West accompanied by his chief of staff, K. 
F. Albee, the general supposition was that 
he would have the Empire Theatre in 
Cleveland added to his list of bookings lw- 
forc his return. 

But through Keith's disinclination t"» 
guarantee anything causing a money out - 
lay, the management of the Empire Thea- 
tre in Cleveland refused to view the situa- 
tion through the Keith magnifying glasses. 
and one more cheap house has been lost to 
the Keith circuit for that reason. 



"The Artists' Forum" It for the artiste exclusively. Any lust complaint any artist may 
have or considers he has will be printed In this department. Or any comment that an artist 
may desire to make. 

Also any artist or act that disagrees with a reviewer on Variety in his review of the artist's 
work or act may have his criticism of the criticism printed in this column, and It will be 
nswered by the reviewer. 

Confine your letters to 150 words and write on one side of psper only. 



New York, March 11, 1906. 
Editor Variety. 

Sir : — For some time past your paper has 
been giving the Hippodrome, its manage- 
ment and stockholders several gratuitous 
notices. 

I take it that you want to be fair and 
state the facts as they exist. Thompson & 
Dundy are looking for all the publicity 
they possibly get and we are glad to see 
our names in print every day. 

Two of your statements are so far from 
facts that I have decided to call your at- 
tention to the same. F"irst, Mr. James A. 
Stillman is not a stockholder in the Hippo- 
drome Company (nor in any other enter- 
prise in which Thompson & Dundy are in- 
terested). Neither Mr. Thompson nor my- 
self has the pleasure of acquaintance of 
Mr. Stillman — nor do we know him by 
sight. Neither have we ever had any back- 
ing of any description from him — or from, 
any institution in which he is supposed to 
be interested. 

The other statement — that the salaries of 
the chorus at the Hippodrome have been 
reduced from $18 to $12 per week — is en- 
tirely without foundation and not based on 
facts of any description. Not one member 
of the Hippodrome chorus now receives (or 
ever has received) less than $18 per week, 
and there is no intention on the part of the 
management to make their salaries any 
less. E. 8- Dundy. 



New York, March 12, 1906. 
Editor Variety. 

Sir : — In your issue of Variety of March 
10 you announce from London that Earl's 
Court will close after this year; this in- 
formation is, I believe, premature, inasmuch 
as 1 am in receipt of a letter from the chair- 
man of the above institution requesting me 
to go to London for a personal interview 
in the matter of taking my brother-in-law's 
(lmre Kiralfy) place and arrange for a 
colossal show next year. Further, to said 
invitation of chairman 1 cabled I would 
immediately sail for London after my pies 
cut Havana (Cuba) opera season is closed; 
thai will be on or about April 1- 

Edmund Ocrgon. 



Editor Variety. 

Sir: Will you kindly state in your next 
issue the fact that the team of Cunningham 
and Coveiiey did n<>t play the Family Then 
tie. New York city, week of March 5, 
owing to the fact that we did not send our 
billing and were canceled? Therefore the 
notice about said team in your issue of 
March in is about parties who are working 
under our names. We have just closed 
with Hyde's Blue Ribbon company. 

Cunningham and Corrnry, 



Buffalo, March 7. 100G. 
Editor Variety. 

Sir: I wish to inform you of our mis 
Imp while playing here at Shea** Theatre 
this week. 

On Monday its we were doing our turn 
on the sta«e some one unlocked Our trunk 
ami took our two vests with contents. Mr. 



Kice lost a gold watch and chain and ten 
dollars. 

Mr. Elmer was the heavy loser; his vest 
held a diamond stud, a ring and collar but- 
ton, gold watch and chain and his Elk's 
charm. His pocketbook contained forty- 
five dollars besides some valuable papers. 
He estimates his loss at over $800. 

We merely inform you of this so you 
may publish it and other artists can be on 
the lookout in other theatres where there 
is no back door tender, for on Monday , 
everybody can come on the stage and now- 
days so many artists carry dressers and 
helpers that the stage manager on the 
opening day is not acquainted with them 
and a stranger can easily get in and hide. 

They say there was a colored fellow on 
the stage who claimed to be Lew Hawkins' 
dresser and he was noticed looking around 
the dressing rooms, but he was not seen 
after the show started on Monday. 

Rice and Elmer. 



Buffalo, March S, 1906. 
Editor Variety. 

Sir: — Since I have been in vaudeville I 
have been more or less annoyed by people 
in connection with the various theatres ask- 
ing where I got my walking song; also 
saying that the song belonged to Miss 
Augusta fJlose. On one occasion Miss Close 
remarked I had an awful nerve in using 
her song. To put a stop to all this petty 
talk I waqt to say that this song was writ- 
ten for me four years ago by Mrs. Andros 
Ilawley, Hoston's well known soprano and 
composer, who at that time wrote all my 
songs. At this time I was a semi-profes- 
sional and used the song with my dice Club 
in summer shows at the fashionable resorts 
such as Narniganset Pier, Newport and 
liar Harbor. After using the song for 
some time I sang it to Blanche King, who 
was so pleased with its possibilities that 
she used it in the "Blonde in Black*" and 
it was afterward used by Fay Templcton 
in the "Runaways." At present the song 
rights belong to no one in particular and I 
do not claim the sole right to its use, al- 
though the song was originally written for 
rn ". The song has many verses and each 
artist who has used same has had different 
verses. The song is not the selling kind, 
merely a song of action, therefore I hope 
you will not think I am plugging the game 
to boost sales. Julian Ellinn*'. 



to be kept in bounds by the baton, for 
surely with such degenerate minds a 
straitjacket tfould be more effective. 

If managers were as solicitous about 
other people's property as their own, they 
would past notices over every musician's 
stand, a* they do in the dressing rooms for 
performers, prohibiting the writing of per- 
sonal comments on actors, all of which are 
utterly out of place and a disgrace to the 
profession. 

Hoping you will give space for the above: 
and thanking you in advance, 

A Continuous Sufferer. 



Editor Variety. 

Sir: Would like to .all the attention of 
resident managers through your columns to 
an unspeakable nuisance to which vaude- 
ville performers are subjected by mem- 
bers of orchestras who do not hesitate to 
mutilate with scurrilous opinions and ob- 
scene pictures arrangements placed in their 
hands, displaying a sense of depravity one 
would scarcely expect to find outside of a 
lunatic asylum. If music be indeed the 
noblest calling these bootjacks who by dint 
.>!' practice have learned to pipe one little 
instrument have -mall sense of harmony. 
which is the highest symbol of law and 
order and the <raly_ wonder is th-v rnn-ugo 



HATHAWAY AND WALTON 
SEPARATED. 

Fred Hathaway, a vaudeville dancer, 
who with his wife cbmposed the team of 
Hathaway and Walton, mourns the loss 
of his former half, $900 in cash, and some 
diamonds. 

Fay Hathaway is one of the vaudeville 
beauties and her husband was devoted to 
her. Wednesday morning she handed her 
husband a telegram signed with the name 
of a booking agent making n specialty 
of summer parks, asking him to call and 
arrange time for next summer. 

Hathaway hurried up to the agent's 
office to be informed that no such tele- 
gram had been sent. , He did not attach 
much importance to that fact, supposing 
it to be a joke put up by one of his 
friends. He went back to the house, but 
not finding his wife there supposed that she 
had gone to Brooklyn, where they were 
playing at Keeney's Theatre, and hurried 
after her. 

At the theatre he found that she had 
been there but had gone away with her 
stage wardrobe. She had left a note for 
him enclosing twenty dollars and saying 
that she had decided to leave him but that 
she did not like to leave him without 
money and hoped that he would be able to 
get along on that until he obtained more 
work. 

He hurried back to 207 East Fourteenth 
street, where they had been stopping, and 
made a hurried search of the rooms. The 
money bag was still there but it was 
stuffed with paper, and diamonds to the 
value of $1,000 were also gone. 

The mystery was not «olved until Hath- 
away received a letter from Mrs. George 
Woodward Raying that her husband, also 
a variety artist, had left her stranded at 
J07 Indiana street, Chicago, and had gone 
to Xew York for the purpose of eloping 
with Mrs. Hathaway. Woodward left a 
letter saying that he had gone to Europe 
and hoped that his wife would poon find a 
new partner. 

STILL ANOTHER GIRL ACT. 
CJraco Fields, who attracted consider- 
able attention during the inn of "It Hap 
pened in Xordland," will appear in vaude- 
ville in a regulation "girl act" at the 
Doric Theatre in Yonlcers on March 'JO 
through the efforts of Pit rot, & (lir;ird. 



EMPIRE CITY QUARTET LANDED. 
\. H. Woods, the melodramatic pro 

duecr, signed the Kmpire City Quartet for 
four years commencing with the season 
<.f Yis •<>!>, on Thursday last. Vaudeville 
i^ expected to mourn meanwhile. 

I',. |':i-' in Wheel's new (Jayet) I'he 
atre at Voungstown, nhio, is said to have 

prOVe v f) '■!! 



I! 



8 



VARIETY 



i 






i 















Shows of the Week 



KEITH'S. 

McMahon's Minstrel Maids and Water- 
melon Girls were the big card. To one not 
familiar with the act the absence of some 
of the original young women, who have 
been replaced by others, is not noticeable. 
One of the new end girls is a material im- 
provement on her predecessor. 

Tim McMahon and Edythe Chappelle in 
their sidewalk conversation made the hit 
of the bill. McMahon speaks naturally, 
and delivers stories of the same brand. 
He has some talk about marriage and the 
consequences, and the house was reluctant 
to allow them to leave. 

Howard and North in "Happy Days" 
fared well, the pathetic finale being liked, 
and Macy and Hall in "A Timely Awaken- 
ing" displayed Miss Hall to better ad- 
vantage than Mr. Macy, who lacks sin- 
cerity and overlooks opportunities. 

Caprice, Lynn and Fay are three girls 
with songs and dances. Each has a solo, 
but they give no evidence of being compe- 
tent until the finale, when a few good steps 
are shown. The smallest young woman 
sings with a brogue. It has been ac- 
quired, otherwise it would have been real 
Hibernian. There are changes, and the 
girls please in a small way when together, 
but in the solo work each takes a dis- 
tinct fall. 

The Americus Comedy Four have a 
megaphone through which some comedy is 
handled, but there are three advertised 
comedians. Little attention is given to 
the singing. The bass has a fair voice. 

Gorman and West have nothing new in 
their sketch, except a song or two, and 
Fred P. Russell, a blackface monologist, 
told some jokes; also singing. He was 
on early enough to discourage any one, 
but the lack of interest shown by him 
affected the reception he might have re- 
ceived. If the indifference has been 
adopted as a style it should be dropped. 

The Smiths on the trapeze work quickly 
and well, having a couple of "thrillers" 
and was really too good an acrobatic turn 
to be placed so early. 

The Martin Brothers on the xylophones 
created no furore, but might have received 
an encore had they played the reserved 
selection third instead of taking the 
chance. 

Adams and Mack, the Crane Brothers 
and the Sisters Herzog were also there. 






FIFTY-EIGHTH STREET. 

William Oourtleigh in "Under the Third 
Degree" is keeping the box office at the 
Fifty-eighth Street house busy this week. 
The former role of Kate Warner, the wife, 
has been entirely eliminated, giving a bet- 
ter finale, and several new lines have been 
added. Mr. Courtleigh is giving a finished 
conception of his various characters, and 
the audience attests full appreciation. 

Junie McCree and company (under 
New Acts) had the second position while 
Carlisle's dogs and ponies were well re- 
ceived. There is an "educated" pony 
named Tom through which Carlisle suc- 
ceeds in mystifying the house to some 
extent in mental calculations by the 
animal. To the uninitiated, the mathe- 
matical problems solved by the small 
horse appear miraculous, the trainer seem- 
ingly standing motionless. 

Hawthorne and Burt in their sidewalk 



talk and dances did well enough, the 
Moose" end of the dancing gaining a strong 
encore, and the Herald Square Quartet 
received their share of laughs through the 
comedy, the arrangement of the act re- 
maining the same previously seen. 

The acrobatic feats of the Four Bards 
were thoroughly appreciated here, two of 
the tricks receiving tumultuous applause. 
The quartet do everything with ease and 
grace, robbing themselves of much recog- 
nition through the lack of display made. 
No "faking" is attempted, but it would 
be better to have more showiness, as an 
average audience does not appreciate the 
high grade work these boys are giving 
unless a fuss is made about it. 

Murphy and Nichols in "From Zaza to 
Uncle Tom" are laughed at with the same 
frequency that follows their production 
wherever it is presented. The comedy 
touches in the sketch are of the kind that 
may not be overlooked, and at Fifty-eighth 
Street that is what suits the patrons. 
They have not been trained to delve deeply 
for humor, and when it is passed out to 
them after the style of a three sheet the 
laughter is so much the heartier. 

The Eight Vassar Girls have their 
strongest hold in the electric finale with 
Armstrong's spectacular ballet. It seems 
a long wait to hear the girls play several 
frayed out melodies until the finish is 
reached, but a pretty stage picture is the 
reward. 

May Leon had an educated rooster and 
a dog, while the motion pictures consumed 
some time pictorially describing "The 
Life of a Newsboy." 



IMPERIAL. 

The placement of the numbers on the 
program Monday night at the Imperial 
displayed a crude knowledge on the part 
of the responsible one of how to arrange 
a vaudeville bill. 

Nick Long and Idalene Cotton were 
number three, while Chris Smith and the 
Johnsons, an ordinary colored act, fol- 
lowed as number four. Kitty Traney 
closed the first half of the evening's en 
tertainment, and May Boley, appearing 
around town for the first time (see New 
Acts) opened after the wait was over. 

Matthews and Ashley, playing in "one"' 
appeared next to the last on the bill, 
while Louise Brehany with the opening 
and closing numbers were the only num- 
bers properly placed. 

Long and Cotton pleased the Brooklyn - 
ites. They liked Miss Cotton, and said 
so, but more emphatically in her imper- 
*onation of Mrs. Fiske than her ques 
tionable imitation of a French music hall 
singer. Miss Cotton's talents do not run 
particularly to short skirts and fleshings, 
with low cut bodice and a picture hat. 
Something more dignified is expected. 

Kitty Traney gave the diversified ani- 
mal and juggling exhibition she has been 
appearing in, and received applause, not 
for the excellence of what she did but for 
the manner in which it was done. 

Matthews and Ashley are still borne up 
with a parody, which remains the same 
as doe9 the rest of what they offer 
in "A Smash-up in Chinatown." 

I/wise Brehany, a peculiar soprano, had 
a colored boy in the balcony as an assis 
tant In the chorus of one song. The boy 



By Sime 



has a sweet voice, and won three encores 
for the white end of the act. The first 
selection Miss Brehany sings is pitched so 
high as to result in an imitation of a 
steam calliope. The "Sweetest Story Ever 
Told" is sandwiched in. Miss Brehany is 
expressive while vocalizing, but before and 
between she carries a look of utter con- 
tempt spread over her countenance. 

The Silverton-Oliver trio on the tight 
wire have duplicates of two of the best 
tricks performed by the Two Meers, es- 
|>ecially the "double step." There is a 
boy dressed as a girl. He neither looks 
nor acts the part and there is no plau- 
sible reason for the attempted deception. 

The colored folks before mentioned re- 
placed the Gleasons and Houlihan. There 
is no dancing, and when the trio sings 
the absence of colored people's usual strong 
point is regretted. A young man en- 
deavoring to establish himself as a come- 
dian appeals as funny to a few, but the 
only agreeable feature is the ragtime 
piano playing. 

Delmore and Lee on the revolving ladder 
closed a show of eight numbers at 10:30. 



HURTIG & SEAMON'S. 

It does seem plausible that Hurtig & 
Seamon are attempting to improve the 
quality of the bills presented at the Music 
Hall. On paper this week the program 
held out promise. Timothy J. Cronin and 
"The Crickets" will be found under New 
Acts, while of the remainder the Zaneigs 
were the interesting feature, and will be 
retained here for another week. The 
couple have discontinued the book reading, 
but the solution of the cues for the 
"thought transference" is still inexplic- 
able. 

Louis Wesley in the final half of the bill 
received considerable applause, although 
he had appeared in this house before when 
supporting Mrs. Annie Yeamans in prac- 
tically the same offering excepting the first 
musical number. 

Mallory Brothers, Brooks and Halliday, 
the colored musical quartet, have a new 
song, which with the assistance of a 
"prop" bullfrog received the undisguised 
approval of the audience. It is a first rate 
number, and should be employed to bet- 
ter advantage for the finale than the pres- 
ent finish on the brasses. The two features 
should be transposed. 

A detail worthy of note in this act is 
that neither the Misses Brooks nor Halli- 
day make up, and their features have a 
normal appearance, more pleasant to view 
than the many other colored women who 
believe they add an attractiveness by be- 
smearing their faces with paint or powder, 
as the case may be. 

St. John and Le Fevre open the show 
with "A little of everything." The 
"little" is Miss St. John's imitations, par- 
ticularly that of the tough girl. The team 
fail to please in a large measure through 
Le Fevre neglecting to dance with vim or 
style. 

Barney Fagan and Henrietta Byron call 
some songs, dances and changes a "Pro- 
tean Burletta." Miss Byron has several 
changes for the finale, and an attached 
electrical display. The insulated wires 
are plainly noticeable on the outside of 
her costumes when the lights go up, but 
she should be given more time on the stage 
in each. The act is liked, for there are 



sufficient of the older generation who 
never tire of seeing Barney Fagan dance. 
Hugh Stanton and Florence Modena 
give "For Reform." It was received as 
though presented for the first time. Stan- 
ton is still giving a good performance of 
the husband, but Miss Modena either can 
not or will not correct the inflections in 
her voice which ruin her enunciation. 



THE CIRCLE. 



The introduction for Weber & Rush's 
Bon-Tons is called "Americans in Spain" 
and no one is held responsible on the pro- 
gram for it, nor could any one rightfully 
be. It has been carefully picked and se- 
lected from what seemed most desirable 
with the result of giving about the most 
tiresome opening number of any show 
which has played the house this season. 

There is one little chap who saves it 
from being called utter rot. He is Joe 
Watson, a Hebrew comedian, with ideas of 
his own. Watson is the only comedian in 
the company. He has a sweet soprano 
voice and appears in the olio, scoring a 
much larger hit with his parodies than 
Ben Welch did some two weeks ago. The 
reason is plainly apparent. Mr. Watson 
has some good parodies. If he wrote them 
himself he deserves so much more credit. 
One on "Good-night, Beloved, Good-night" 
is cleverly written, and pleases because it 
revives a melody popularly known but 
not still dinned into your ears continually 
by every singer in vaudeville. 

Tn the afterpiece he appears as a boy. 
and this is where Toma Hanlon first at- 
tracts notice. She appears in tights in 
the opening, having several songs to sing 
throughout, but with a thin voice and a 
very flat top note she glides along until 
the character of the girl "kid" in the 
finish. 

Harry Keeler is a big comedian in point 
of size, but he is not big in his ideas. In 
the beginning his favorite expression for 
a time is "son of-a-gun" but as this grow* 
too tame, he says "son-of -a -biscuit" and 
is not over nice in saying that. This 
would do very well for a disreputable dive, 
but in a burlesque theatre having the 
patronage of many women and young girls 
at the matinee common sense should be 
displayed. 

There is a chorus of ten girls, six being 
Berg's Merry Girls in a turn by them- 
selves in the olio, during which they ling 
and dance. Each one is a contortionist, 
and the final acrobatic work of their act 
is well worth seeing. s 

Janette Woods with an inconsequential 
speaking part in both pieces seems to have 
fallen into the present company by mis- 
take, and Jessie Sharp with Clara Mar 
tinez sports tights, doing little else. Minnie 
Searls is prominent, also appearing with 
Chris Whelan in a conversation. Whelan 
is not destined for greatness as a "Dutch" 
comedian. Any other part attempted 
would fit more gracefully. Laredo and 
Blake in acrobatics have some good com 
edy work by the clown, who keeps away 
from the James Rice work, and the other 
hoy is a good contortionist. 

Sol Fields wrote the last piece. "Miss 
Bell's Ladies' Seminary." After Weber <K 
"Rush put in a few necessary chorus girls 
they should send an extra check to Mr. 
Fields for keeping the organization out 
f,h;a sesgon. 



\ 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Chicot 



COLONIAL. 

Dropping their old contention that they 
were the band of one of the Scottish regi- 
ments stationed in Canada, the Kilties 
now offer themselves merely as a band. 
They form the feature at the Colonial 
this week with an elaborate program too 
formidable in appearance to have a proper 
effect upon the audience. It seems to be 
of such length that encores are not de- 
manded, though the director, Albert Cook, 
has a happy faculty of devising trick ef- 
fects for his encores. The Clan Johnstone 
troupe do dancing and piping and there is 
an a capella chorus by the choir. It makes 
an interesting number and the standard of 
the band is higher than thnt of a few 
seasons ago. Edmund Day in his own 
play of "The Sheriff" is disappointing, 
lie has special scenery to show the Arizona 
way station in which the scene is laid, 
and kills this by permitting his support, 
Miss Winston, to wear a dress better 
suited to an afternoon tea than a shack 
station. She is supposed to be the tele- 
graph operator and to run the lunch room 
(not of the Harvey sort) yet she wears an 
expensive gown and a silk underskirt. 
Moreover, she abandons the station without 
waiting for a relief or even notifying the 
train dispatcher that she contemplates ab- 
sence. George Fisher is as bad as Miss 
Winston in the matter of acting and their 
combined badness kills the effect of Mr. 
Day's work. The story is interesting, if 
improbable, and Mr. Day for the sake of 
his own fair name should employ a com- 
petent support. The Globe of Death is a 
feature sufficiently thrilling to satisfy the 
most exacting, the loop being looped 
within the sphere at a dozen different 
angles. Melville Ellis had a piano mono- 
logue that was one of the real hits of the 
hill and kept his word when he promised a 
new act. He should be seen around more 
frequently, for his act possesses real merit 
and appeal. George Fuller Golden had a 
fair percentage of new talk to brighten 
his opening monologue and scored with 
his own protean drama — a clever travesty 
on De Vries and Roberts. Rice and Pre- 
vost were the same old hit they always 
are and Chalk Saunders with a clean cut 
.artoon specialty pleased. He is the one 
sketcher who does not try to look like an 
artist and this helps some. Mayme Rem- 
ington made a hit with her picks and the 
Milani trio made good music. They would 
do better to make use of costumes not so 
exaggerated. It spoils the effect. The 
Vitagraph has a "chase" film with some 
row effects. New effects are needed be 
cause chase ideas are staling. 



ORPHEUM. 

Rigo's invalid finger is now convalescent 
and he is playing the violin when he re- 
members to. Air. Rigo in makeup pain 
fully resembles Hodges, of Hodges and 
Launchmere, also in makeup. Need more 
be said of the fatal beauty that coaxed 
the Chimay down the primrose path? As 
a performer he could get a violin desk in 
any orchestra in town, but as a leader he 
displays lamentable taste in the matter 
<>f selections. Instead of the Hungarian 
improvisations that make for merit, he 
interprets some selections of the hackneyed 
sort and he stumbles around the stage at 
the end of his act with singular lack of 
grace. Some persons applaud because 



they think it to be the thing, but most 
of the respectable Brooklynites look and 
wonder, and wondering, are content. Vesta 
Victoria had to go to Brooklyn to come 
into her own. Here she is a real hit, the 
audience clamoring for her after her 
fourth song. She has personality, and now 
that her voice is in trim she is going 
strong. She is somewhat given to coarse- 
ness of gesture, a fault not inherent but 
the product of the English halls. The 
Millman Trio follow her and make up for 
her refusal to take an encore. The young- 
ster in the troupe is the brightest per- 
former on the wire in the business. It 
is not her tricks but her style that wins 
the house, but she has them well in hand 
before the act has run five minutes. Charles 
Leonard Fletcher is talking sketch for 
next season. If he is wise he will keep to 
his present work, for it is an act that has 
a real draught. In spite of its intensity 
and the success it makes, he would do 
well to change "At the Telephone." It is 
not his best work and it piles horror on 
horror with the scene from "Drink" — an 
imitation of the same actor — following. 
The latter is by far the better and for the 
other something else should be had: a new 
imitation and a new name. It is easily 
the best act Fletcher has presented. 
Fmma Carus has made vast strides in her 
singing. In place of a freak contralto she 
now possesses a well schooled mezzo which 
she displays to excellent advantage. She 
has learned the value of repose and ex- 
cept when she indulges in the old finger 
snapping (always her worst mannerism) 
she is a revelation to those who remember 
five years back. Now she is entitled to 
rank with the best of them both in selec- 
tion of songs and singing. It is a wel- 
come thing that she has escaped the slump 
that threatened her a couple of years ago, 
following her season at the New York 
Theatre. Berzac caused the usual roars 
of laughter with his troupe of tumblers 
used in conjunction with his trained mule, 
and S. Miller Kent in "Just Dorothy" ap- 
pealed to all floors. Walter C. Kelly was 
refreshing with good stories and De Veau 
drew some pictures, including the coaster 
in the snow scene. Frank and Jen Latona 
have some bad comedy. Mrs. Latona is a 
clever pianist technically but lacks in- 
terpretive skill, while he plays the Mis- 
erere. That's the up to date sort of mu- 
sician he is. 



HYDE & BEHMAN'S. 

Henri French is the chief attraction at 
Hyde & Behman's this week. It is al- 
most a vaudeville reappearance, for Mr. 
French has been working with a reper- 
toire show of late and is unfamiliar in 
vaudeville. He offers an act that is too 
much of a hodge-podge to possess strong 
appeal in any particular. He does a lit- 
tle of his old cycle work, makes a rag 
picture, does Goldin's first cage trick and 
imitates Franz Liszt and Oeatore as 
leaders. He would do verv much better 
to go back to his cycle work or else de- 
velop his act along a single line and 
specialize in that. At present his work is 
too disjointed. Fred Hallen and Molly 
Fuller are repeating here in "A Morning 
Dip," which appears to have been improved 
somewnat, though it will never become a 
bit. They would do better to return to 



t lie old repertoire until something new 
offers. Mr. Hallen acceptably reproduces 
some of the old time dances and Miss Ful- 
ler has a recitation that amuses. The 
rest is poor dialogue and it does not ap- 
pear to be susceptible of improvement. 
Elmer Tenley is liked over here and has 
cut his act a trifle so that he does not 
tire. His talk runs mostly to race track 
and street car episodes and lacks variety. 
Sam Watson with his barnyard pets shows 
some of the most cheerful canines to be 
imagined. They work apparently because 
they like to and not because they know 
they have to. If Watson would cut out 
the policeman and about nine-tenths of 
his heavy English comedy the act would 
be even better than it is. At present the 
training makes the hit in spite of the 
comedy. Grace Leonard waved the dear 
old flag and drew down the applause that 
was coming to it. She should chop that 
song as well as the Hitchcock offering and 
go in for songs better suited to her style. 
She has a style and needs to fit it. Burke 
and La Rue went back to the old "Silver 
Moon" act and made a hit on the lower 
half of the bill while Avery and Hart 
were not so well liked. It is a pity that 
Williams and Walker do not write some 
more stuff so that they might be enabled 
to get a new act. They are getting stale 
in the Blackville Strutters specialty and 
work without enthusiasm. The straight 
man, in particular, and Jules Kusell had 
a bad sketch poorly played, and Heeler's 
Japs did some ordinary barrel kicking and 
a perch act. 



PASTOR'S. 



Lawrence and Harrington are the head- 
liners at Pastor's this week. That they 
have the boys shouting goes without say- 
ing, for they have been prime favorites 
here for years. It is a pity that in form- 
ing up a new act they did not get further 
away from the old business and songs, 
for had they done so there would be a 
wider field of booking for them. Trum- 
bull and Barnes have a singing specialty. 
The best thing to be said of the act is 
that they wear silk stockings. They sing 
with but poor success and introduce some 
unintentionally funny steps. They do not 
tell jokes, which helps some. Diamond 
and Smith have motion pictures for some 
of their songs. Most of the motion af- 
fairs are old: witness the 60th regiment, 
returning from the Spanish -American war 
and similar films. Others show that they 
are taken for the song in hand, both from 
the fact that slides and films agree and 
because of the timing of the action. The 
best of these is "Everybody Works, etc." 
which is almost exact, flerr Saona shows 
what he thinks some famous men should 
look like. He thinks Carnegie looks more 
like Dowie than he does, but he gets away 
with the audience. Trene Lee works well 
in boy's clothes. She needs to have her 
voice cultivated to eliminate an uncertain 
vibrato that occasionally mars her per 
formance, as she needs to get rid of a 
perceptible fear of the audience. Acker 
and Gilday offer a talking act with sing- 
ing on the side. The comedian gives 
promise of developing, but the straight 
man (Acker, by the indication of his watch 
charm) is too heavy and stilted. He sug 
gests that he has been a stock actor at 



some time. Cunningham and Smith have 
a disjointed sketch in which the mau 
does some weird tumbling. He wears no 
pads and yet does the hat somersault and 
other work that is hard on the spine, even 
when pads are employed. He is such a 
good rough tumbler that it is a pity he 
does not pay more attention to his comedy 
both in manner and makeup. Less ex- 
aggeration in both would benefit his 
style very considerably. Miss Smith does 
little more than feed lines, but does that 
well enough. The act needs smarter dia- 
logue before it can command a good sal- 
ary. Guy's Parlor Minstrels is a faint 
copy of Mitchell and Marron with bone 
solos as a feature. It is very weak. The 
Two Pucks, Reeves and Quinn, the Jack- 
sons, the Brennans and Hathaway and 
Siegel and the Miller-Browning Co. are 
also included. The two last named are to 
be found in New Acts. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

Fred Walton was the star of a capital 
bill at the Twenty-third Street house this 
week. Frank Lynne, an English performer, 
made his American debut. There was a 
capital comedy bill with real names and 
important acts, quite the most important 
offering that has been shown at the the- 
atre for some time. The money that was 
spent for Walton did not rob the rest of 
the program of its merit, and Mr. 
Walton will do Mr. Proctor greater 
good than half a dozen acts of the 
Lillian Russell type. One of the best 
of the laughmakers was Wilfred Clarke 
and his company. They were doing 
"What Will Happen Next?", first shown 
at the Amphion a couple of months ago. 
Since then the action has been built up 
until it stands the best sketch Clarke has 
yet given us, and he has four or five good 
ones to his credit. Above all things he 
appreciates the value of action and he 
does not waste thirty seconds in getting 
down to the real business in hand. Leslie 
and Dailey scored with their slang sketch 
and the Pieehiani troupe did good work 
on the mat. Stuart Barnes had some new 
songs and some old talk. The audience 
did not resent the talk but laughed at 
it as heartily as though they had not 
heard it first some three or four years 
ago. The songs are newer. The Five Ro- 
ma nos are blamed on the Hippodrome, 
which is not fair to the "Hip." They 
have elephants at the Sixth avenue place, 
but the large member of the quartet is not, 
one of these. The youngster is the real 
feature of the act, and a big one. Hoey 
and Lee had some old ideas in new paro- 
dies. It would be better for them did 
they have new ideas as well. There was 
a time when their work was crisp. Now 
they give new versions to old jokes such 
as the story of the Scot finnan who, being 
given his choice, elected to be hanged on 
a gooseberry bush. Just fancy! The 
Three Deltons offer «ome wholly un- 
neressarv coined v in avi acrobatic and hand 
standing turn of merit, and G'lroy, naynes 
and Montgomery sinjr and dance in a 
way the audience appears to like. There 
wac an extra turn in Arthur Weld, who 
led for Mr. Walton. He stood on a soap 
box at. least three feet above the stage 
level and seemed to think that he was 
helping him along. Mr, Walton should 
fit' him and hire a dwarf leader. 



10 



VARIETY. 






THE AMATEURS AT MINER'S BOWERY 

THEATRE— THEIR ORIGINAL HONE 



The Youthful Aspirants and Possible Future Professionals as Sketched by Leo Carrillo while in 

Competition for the Cash Prizes and Plaudits of the Audience 



Woe betide the person who has ever set 
foot on the Island of Manhattan and dis- 
claims knowledge of Miner's Bowery 
Theatre, "the house which made burlesque 
famous" and "the original home of the 
amateurs." 

He or she will be told to "go to." The 
present generation have the impression 
that Miner's Bowery was giving two 
performances a day before New York was 
settled. 

Whether that be so is foreign to the 
subject in hand. "Amateurs" is the bur- 
den of this article, and they may be found 
at this theatre on any Friday night in the 
raw and natural state. 

There will never be a dispute as to the 







statement that Miner's Bowery was the 
first theatre in this country to introduce 
"amateur night." The Bowery enjoyed a 
monopoly for a long time until other 
theatrical managers discovered that not 
alone did it prove an additional source of 
income, but was a valuable advertisement 
for the theatre. 

During the current, week a hundred 
'amateur nights" have beer, given in the 
variety theatres of this country, but no- 
where do you find the amateurs, the audi- 
ence or the methods that are in vogue at 
Miner's Bowery Theatre. 

You may have seen other amateurs or 
amateur nights, and you may have heart- 
ily enjoyed them, but at Miner's Bowery 



HOW KEITH LOST LOWELL. 

Lowell is no longer a spot on the Keith 
map, through Fay Brothers & Hosford, 
the owners of the Lowell Opera House, 
which Keith booked for a time, tiring of 
having to make up a deficiency of from 
$300 to $500 every Saturday. 

Their contract with the Keith Booking 
Agency called for $100 a week to the let- 
ter. for placing the bills there. Hosford, 
of the firm, is wealthy through the bit- 



you must shriek with laughter unless ut- 
terly devoid of the least sense of humor. 
Every person in the audience is a critic, 

LilljaH Bfll , 




and Tom Miner, the son of the late Henry 
Clay Miner, the founder of the Miner 
theatres, is the most discerning critic of 
all. 

Tom assumed charge of the proceedings 

W'LL./£ J UL.L/VAN 

G- of- T//f 'WooK. " 




in person at the Bowery a week ago last 
night, and nonchalantly leaned against the 
proscenium areh while directing the course 



lers of the same name, but as a business 
man could not see the policv of doling 
out large chunks of ready cash for the 
privilege of remaining on the Keith route 
sheet. 

Winn Cahn & Grant, the legitimate 
theatrical managers, having a large and 
the only New England circuit, threatened 
:i new theatre for the Massachusetts 
town, Messrs. Fay Bros. & Hosford asked 
'Why?", grasping the opportunity to rid 



of procedure to bcTollowed with the fif- 
teen numbers on the program. 
It was Mr. Miner who gave a sugges- 




tion to the beginner, or remarked "that 
will be about all for you," and when 
'the hook" had to put in its appearance 
Mr. Miner was particularly solicitous that 
no mistake be made. 



o V£ / \^ A y o r 




\ full supply «»f comedy effects is kept 
constantly on hand. No amateur need fear 
that he will be neglected if his efforts to 
win <mc <>f the cash prizes offered by the 

themselves of an elephant and preventing 
|K)Asible opposition. 

The difficulty was' to ■mocth out the 
Keith contract, which has until May I 
next to run. .lulius Cfehn called in his 
counsel, (Jeorge M. Leventritt of I.cven- 
tritt & Brennan. Mr. Leventritt Asked 
Mr. Hosford, "How much are you paying 
Keith a week." "One hundred dollars." 
replied Mr. Hosford. "Mow much are you 
l os ing weekly '" again inquired T.cvcntrilt 



management for the three turns selected 
by the audience as the successful ones do 
not meet with approval. 
Immediately after the close of the regu- 



lar entertainment of the evening Mr. 
Miner announces the number of applicants 




for a. hearing, and the house settles back 
into the seats, with an anticipatory grin 
on every face. The rest the pictures 
show. Sim v. 



"Three hundred to five hundred," answered 
Hosford. "Very well, then." remarked the 
lawyer, "continue to pay Keith the $100 
agreed upon and do as you will about th*» 
theatre." 



„ The Three Meteors, the foreign living 
aerial act in the "Yankee Haiders" at the 
Auditorium at Chicago, will play the Hip- 
podrome hero upon the close of the West- 
ern engagement. 



VARIETY. 



ii 



BENNETT INCORPORATED. 

The Bennett's Theatrical Enterprises is 
the name of the new company which has 
formed in London, Ontario, Canada, which 
is now being incorporated for two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars with an un- 
limited amount of capital to buck it. 

New up-to-date vaudeville theatres will 
be erected in Hamilton, Ottawa and Mon- 
treal. Options on sites have already been 
procured and work will commence as soon 
as possible. A new theatre will also be 
erected in London which will be a ground 
lloor house with all modern improvements. 

The company is composed of some of 
Canada's leading capitalists, who repre- 
sent millions of dollars*, including J. C. 
Duffield, the millionaire gas magnate; T. 
If. Smallman, a railroad financier; Major 
T. Beattie, a retired capitalist; Mr. C. W. 
Bennett, proprietor and manager of Ben- 
nett's Vaudeville, who lias made such a 
success in London, and Mr. John Pringle, 
manager of the Bank of Toronto, one of 
the most successful men in Ontario. 

The company is as follows: J. C. Duf- 
field, president; Mr. C. W. Bennett, vice- 
president and general manager; Mr. John 
Pringle, treasurer. 

The board of directors is: Mr. J. C. 
Duffield, Mr. T. H. Smallman, Major T. 
Beattie, Mr. C. W. Bennett, Mr. John 
Pringle. 



A BIG VENTURE. 

St. Louis, March Hi. 

Something of a sensation was created 
this week when it became known that 
local business men have taken steps 
toward forming a stock company to build 
in St. I -on i 3 an immense summer park to 
rival any of its kind in the country. 

It will be a second World's Fair in 
amusement features, and 1600,000 has 
already been subscribed. It is estimated 
that the project as outlined will require 
much more. 

It is also the intention of the company 
to invade South America, that being con- 
sidered a prospective lucrative; field for 
summer amusements. 

The company will duly incorporate dur- 
ing the month, and the St. Louis park 
will be in readiness to throw the gates 
oj>en at the commencement of the '07 sea- 
son. 



A BURLESQUE WEEKLY. 

The "Empire Theatre Weekly News" is 
the title of a weekly paper published in 
Denver as a press sheet for the Empire 
Theatre there, offering traveling burlesque 
shows as the attractions. 

Barney Gerard, the manager of Miner's 
Bohemians, had an interesting article re- 
cently on "How to a write a play." Mr. 
Gerard gave a humorous recital of his ear- 
ly endeavors in that direction. 



BAKERSFIELD COMING IN. 

Messrs. Harell and Gotchett, managers 
of the Union Theatre in Bakersfield, Cal.. 
have received the plans for a new vaude- 
ville theatre to be erected by them in the 
same town at a cost of about $25,000. 
That's a lot of money in Bakersfield. The 
house will be booked by Win. Weston of 
San Francisco. 



AMPHION. 

The bill at the Amphion gives the im- 
pression of being somewhat below stand- 
ard this week, probably because it starts 
off badly. Joseph Hart and Carrie DeMar 
in "The Other Fellow" is the biggest num- 
ber on the bill as to type space and es- 
timated salary, but in point of interest 
has little the advantage of James B. 
Donovan and Miss Rena Arnold. 

Thomas and Payne start the bill. They 
are a couple of negroes who belong in the 
cheaper houses. The only thing that 
tended to make the turn possible was the 
fact that the man of the team was 
frankly and good naturally a negro. He 
has the spontaneous good nature of his 
race, sang coon songs as only the straight- 
away jap-a-lac can and danced well. The 
woman belonged to the more pretentious 
sort and her clothes showed the effects of 
being hurriedly unpacked from a trunk. 

This over, the bill was better. Howard 
and Howard followed. Their act has pos- 
sibilities, but needs to be brightened up 
and smartened in many particulars. The 
comedy member does his Joe Welch imper- 
sonation well enough to suggest that with 
earnest study he could make it better. As 
it is his feature misses by a very narrow 
margin. The straight partner wears an 
English walking suit of proper cut and 
thereby fills his part in the contract. Very 
little else is required of him that could 
not as well be done by a phonograph. 

James B. Donovan is gifted with a 
truly Irish brand of humor. For vaude- 
\ille purposes his semi-monologue with a 
feeder in the seat of the orchestra leader's 
chair comes close to being a tenstrikc. 
If Donovan didn't write the lines himself 
they were written by another Irishman, 
for they have the right ring about them. 
lie was placed late on the bill, separated 
by only one act from the motion pictures, 
but the audience caught the spirit of his 
fun-making. Miss Arnold is of only pass- 
ing importance in the act, but does what 
little is demanded of her gracefully . 

Jennie Yea mans has strung a bunch of 
songs along a slender thread of burlesque 
impersonations of amateur theatrical as- 
pirants. Her voice is pleasing in quality 
and her personality is wholesome. She 
filled in fifteen minutes or so very ac- 
ceptably. 

Edwin Keough's "A Vaudeville Sur- 
prise'' has a number of rough places in it. 
The time allowances for a change of cos- 
tume both before and after the change 
for the scene from "Ingomar" are badly 
filled in by monologues of the worst sort, 
particularly the latter. Helen Nelson's 
talk after the change is little short of im- 
becile. 

The Musical Avollos look well as to the 
two women, but the process of beating 
• music" out of hickory blocks is rather 
a limited field of endeavor. 

The Wilton Brothers closed the bill be- 
fore the pictures. The burlesque per- 
former of the two is funny in places. 



I). J. Robinson and J. D. lV.more, both 
of Lansing, Mich., will open a vaude- 
ville theatre to be named the Bijou, in 
Saginaw, in the same State shortly. 



The Hotel Lange in St. Louis, under the 
new management of Gus Worm, had its 
opening last Tuesday. Nearly all the art- 
ists in that city at the time attended. 



Sylvia Nahlo, the engaging young 
woman formerly connected with the Mari- 
nelli office in New York city, has joined 
the office staff of Clifford C. Fischer, "The 
Agents' Agent." 



NOVELTY. 

Joe Welch heads the Novelty bill this 
week. By the same token, Joe Welch 
stands the acid test. Never heard of the 
acid test? Well, it's this: When a single 
I»erformer of high class ability can enter 
a house of the rougher sort and score there, 
he has stood the acid test. Ordinarily He- 
brew comedians are in the last degree im- 
possible, depending for their laughter on 
the rawest sort of burlesque and ugly cari- 
cature. Welch, however, draws his Jew 
from life. He is the impersonation of a 
pure Ghetto type of the low easte Hebrew. 
Greene and Werner with their "Babes in 
the Jungle" sketch held second interest on 
the program. Musically and scenically the 
sketch is exceptionally well arranged and 
it received the appreciation it deserved. 
Both the woman and the man of the pair 
work conscientiously and hard. The wom- 
an is shapely and sings acceptably and the 
man sings coon songs as well as any pale- 
face that comes to my mind. He rather 
overdoes the business of the savage in the 
second part of the sketch, however. It 
was well received in the Novelty, but in a 
house that catered to more cultivated audi- 
ences it might tire. In dressing and musi- 
cal arrangement the act ranks with the 
best of its sort in vaudeville. 

Daly and Devere start the bill. They be- 
long to the burlesque comedy school and 
while their work makes its appeal largely 
to the gallery, it is funny also to the lower 
part of the house. The act is as old al- 
most as vaudeville and has stood the test 
of time. 

Maim and Mazett have not abated one 
jot of their act. It is funny in a novel 
way, the comedy of the pair depending on 
the tired utterances and actions of the 
tramp. 

Holcombe, Curtis and Webb are using 
their old sketch, "A Winter Session." As 
a high class offering it lacks a good deal of 
coming up to the headline requirements, 
but the comedy work of Curtis as a yokel 
and the singing of Margaret Webb saves 
the piece from extinction. 

Nettie Vesta, who was formerly Dorothy 
in "The Wizard of Oz," is here also. Her 
act closely follows that of Anna Laughlin, 
both as to costume and setting. Miss Ves- 
ta appears in short skirts and sings four 
songs. She is rather more petite than Miss 
Laughlin, although no taller, and has a 
voice of considerable merit. 

Ziska and King call themselves burlesque 
comedy magicians. The accent is strong 
on the "burlesque." As magicians the pair 
are rated pretty low, but the burlesque is 
at times very funny. The straight mem- 
ber does some sleight of hand work very 
skillfully, but all his tricks are of the old- 
est kind and have been done to death. 

Laura Bennett and company appeared 
for the first time here in a new sketch 
called "From Way Down South." The act 
i»- reviewed in the New Acts department. 

Virginia Karl, carrying eight people, 
caught the Twentieth Century Limited on 
the New York Central last Sunday to en- 
able the act to open in time at the Inter- 
national Theatre in Chicago Monday. The 
fare on that luxurious speeding palace is 
thirty dollars a person when the big West- 
ern town is the destination. 

M. S. Bentham, the agent, has arranged 
to brintf over Mile. Aubin Leonel from 
I'aris for the entertainment of vaudeville 
audiences next season. 



LONDON. 

John Grieves never calls his girls a 
chorus; he refers to them affectionately 
as his 'bunch." The "bungjr" is at the 
London this week along with a few come- 
dians and the other trimmings of a bur- 
lesque show called the Parisian Belles. 
The "bunch" is the biggest part of the 
outfit because Grieves seems to have a 
squab factory somewhere and knows where 
to get young and good looking girls when 
the rest of the managers lament. Grieves 
also has. the habit of carrying a couple 
of chapei ->ns playfully designated as 
"mothers" and these, too, are not lacking. 
Still, the average is remarkably good and 
did they have good costumes they would 
be a star hit. Some of the dresses are al- 
most filthy and all but one set are shabby. 
It is a pity, for otherwise the chorus 
would be a startler. In one of the big 
acts they are so poorly dressed that they 
look ugly. This is a march of the Amazon 
type with some once white costumes 
trimmed with the bunting that Grieves 
probably used to drape the Bijou with 
at the last inauguration in Washington. 
He has some good work in the olio, notably 
the Heunian Cycle troupe. The man has 
a poor idea of comedy of action and his 
work in this regard tires.' He shows up 
better with his wheel comedy, exhibit- 
ing a lot of freak unicycles that gain 
laughs. There is enough good trick work 
to make a full act but they pad out with 
some poor tricks that cut the average 
• town. The windup is unique in that 
there is a race between the two women on 
a tandem and the man on a single wheel 
and when he comes in first at the end of 
the race he is applauded. It is generally 
supposed that the woman must win. La 
Belle Marie does a wire act in which she 
disrobes on the wire and then performs 
some very ordinary tricks. She seems to 
be one of Grieves' finds, for she has a 
mobile face and a good singing and speak- 
ing voice with some idea of acting. She 
is not as clever as Flora Barker — who is 
one of Grieves' discoveries — but she is 
good. Sutton and Sutton have an acro- 
batic and contortion act in which the man 
shows himself to be a pondrous comedian 
while the girl accomplishes some clever 
postures. Burns and Morris, the latter 
Ed Morris of Sam T. Jack fame, have re- 
markable memories. They use work others 
have been trying to forget for the past 
ten years. Morris is good in the burlesque 
but not in this. There is a singing act not 
listed on the program and the drill act 
already referred to. The olio winds up 
with motion pictures, the chase subject 
being the same as is shown at the Colonial 
this week. The burlesques are bodge- 
podges of no particular merit and redeemed 
only through the use of the chorus, which 
is kept busy here. It is the sort of show 
that the boys like, as is attested by the 
well filled matinee house-. Chicot, 



M. S. Bentham has purchased a summer 
home at I* r »ke Ronkonkoma, L. I. The 
place has a barn, and Mr. Rcnlhnm is now 
sleuthing for a horse which can take him 
home when he is unable to pronounce the 
name 



Machnow, the Russian giant said to be. 
nine feet two inches tall, is expected to 
be the summer Bensation when lie appears 
upon Hamnierstein's Roof. 



12 



VARIETY 



SUMMER PARKS 



St. Louis, March 16\ 

M. Louis at present is the storm center 
of park managers and promoters. There 
are meetings galore of directors interested 
in the companies that will during the com- 
ing season undertake to <:et the shekels 
from outdoor amusements. All sorts of 
rumors are rife. 

Foremost in the field are the Hopkins 
Amusement Company, Interstate Com- 
pany and Delmar Garden Company. At a 
meeting of the directors last Saturday, 
held in the Interstate Company's office, 
nearly a hundred propositions on parks 
were made, but all business was deferred 
for ten days. 

Colonel Hopkins has Forest Park High- 
lands, St. Louis, which opens April 22, 
Forest Park, Kansas City, Mo., Fontaine 
Ferry Park, Louisville, Ky., and East End 
Park, Memphis, Tenn. All will have early 
openings. 

John C. Jannopoulos will handle the 
reins at Delmar Garden, Mannion's Park 
will be managed by Patrick Mann ion, West 
End Heights by Louis Obert, Suburban by 
Louis Oppenheimer, Hashagen's by Fred 
Hashagen, Lemp's Park by Henry Wal- 
rapp; Edgemond and Riverside Park have 
not as yet been whipped into shape. 

A radical change in system has been 
brought about by an agreement between 
all the managers to charge admission at 
the gates. Formerly admission was only 
charged to various attractions within the 
enclosures. High class vaudeville, of 
course, will predominate in the way of at- 
tractions. Colonel Hopkins has engaged 
the Mexican Artillery Band for the St. 
Louis opening. 

The Western Vaudeville Managers' Asso- 
ciation will do the booking for all the 
parks except Mannion's, which will be 
taken care of by Edward Shayne. 

Joe Pazen. 



From Montreal comes news that that 
city will have an unexpected addition to 
its summer amusement resorts from an 
altogether unlooked for direction. River- 
side Park, which was opened about two 
years ago by L. Tromblay, is going to be 
extensively and expensively improved. 
Mr. Tromblay, by reason of the success 
made of the o *ii&^Uj0&> nas organized a 
stock company to De known as the River- 
side Park Amusement Company, with a 
capitalization of $250,000, all of which will 
be expended upon the park direct. A Gal- 
veston Flood, Live Fox Chase, House of 
Trouble, Roller Coasters and the better 
known park features will be duly installed. 
The Live Fox Chase is expected to ex- 
cite genuine interest, and it undoubtedly 
will in a country where that form of 
amusement is customarily followed when 
a light snow is on the ground. Riverside 
formerly pave a good elass of vaudeville, 
and that feature will be retained, with a 
higher grade of acts hereafter to be 
offered. The hotel is to be enlarged, but 
the management has not as yet decided 
whether the vaudeville performance shall 
be in the open air or under rover. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to the 
lighting, the electrical effects being des- 
tined as the chief attraction. The officers 
of the company are L. Tromblay, president, 
O. Mailloux, park manager, and Al E. 
Read, amusement manager. Mr. Read held 
a similar position before the reorga- 



nization. The opening is scheduled for 
May 20. 



Work is progressing rapidly on the 
Wonderland Park at Revere Beach (Bos- 
ton). Nearly all of the larger buildings 
are completed except the finishing decora- 
tions. One of the principal features at 
the new park will be the Japanese village. 
All the work is in charge of the Japanese 
Construction Company, of which F. U. 
shic-hi is manager. The workmen are real 
Japs, imported especially for this work. 
The village will contain shops, Japanese 
warriors, fencing, sword dancing, jiu- 
jitsu exhibitions, geisha girls and other 

like attractions. 





The new park at Schenectady, N. Y., 
will be named Luna. The Lloyd-Walsh 
Amusement Company, a corporation incor- 
porated under the New York State laws, 
will direct operations. The capital inter- 
ested is from Pittsburg, Pa., and this may 
be an offshoot of the Ingersoll circuit, 
the similarity in city and name making 
that likely. The park will contain 12 
ycres with a frontage of 400 feet on the 
Mohawk River. It is one of the most 
natural spots in northern New York. 
The opening will occur on Decoration Day. 
About $75,000 will have been invested by 
that time. J. O. Walsh is the manager. 



At Springfield, 111., the Illinois Zoo and 
Amusement Company announce the open- 
ing of their new park Decoration Day, 
May 30. An 1,800 foot velvet coaster will 
be installed immediately and other novel 
features added. Overtures have been 
made to Smith and Burton, managers of 
the Gaiety, to conduct the vaudeville. 
Mildred Park will be enlarged and a 
change of management made. lies Bros., 
who have heretofore conducted it, have 
relinquished their interests and Fred T. 
Whipp, former treasurer of the Chatter- 
ton, will manage it. George W. Chatter- 
ton will book the vaudeville. 



The Roseville Amusement Company has 
been formed to build a summer park and 
town about two miles southwest of 
Sharon, Pa. Sharon and Pittsburg money 
back the operations. The town will be 
known as Roseville. An artificial lake, 
scenic railway, dancing pavilion and other 
kindred amusements will be installed. The 
-capital stock of the company is $75,000 
fully paid in, with none on the market. 



The parks at Kansas City, Mo., are 
quite busy now, the workmen being en- 
gaged in getting the resorts ready for the 
coming season. Forest Park will again 
be under the direction of Lloyd Brown, 
who managed it during '02 and '03. Will 
Winch of the Orpheum Theatre will han- 
dle the press matter. Michael G. Meim 
will manage Electric Park, offering vaude- 
ville and bands. Fairmount Park will 
have Ben Rosenthal as its chief executive. 



Frank Melville, of Melville & Shult- 
heiser, will book for the following parks 
this summer, contracts for several others 
having also been closed: 

Now Brunswick, N. J., Rlveraldc Fnrk; Pater- 
loa, N. J., fairyland Park; Albany, N. Y., Elec- 
tric Park: Bofftlo, N. Y., Athletic Purk; Ithaca, 
N. Y.. Ritnvlrk Park; Utlca, N. Y., Summit 
Park; Altoona, Pa., Lakcmotit Park; Bearer Falls, 



Pa., Junction Park; Butler, Pa., Aluuieda Park; 
Brit, Pa., W a Ida met r Park; Ureeuaburg, Pa., 
Oak ford Park; llarriaburg, Pa., Paxtaug Park; 
JolniMi.u ii. Pa., Luna Park; Plttaburg, Pa., Oak- 
wood Park, feoutueru Park, Calhoun Park; Toronto, 
Can., Monroe Park. 



Claude Uagen, who as announced in 
Variety last week will place a 'Tour in 
an Airship" op the spot formerly occu- 
pied by the "Bumps" at Dreamland, 
Coney island, desires the statement cor- 
rected that the Boyce people have any 
connection with either the venture or the 
Independent Amusement Company, of 
which Mr. Hagen is president, that com- 
pany controlling the pleasure giving device 
solely. 



There is a controversy under way be- 
tween H. Janopolous and the other owners 
of the Delmar Gardens in St. Louis, which 
may delay the proposed opening. Jano- 
polous wanted full control, but the price 
offered by him did not suit the others. 
He was given until March 1 to readjust 
his figures. Upon failure to do so his 
partners made other arrangements caus- 
ing the delay. 



The directors of Paragon Park near 
Boston have decided to waive the "Fire 
and Flames" exhibition, for this season 
anyway. Geo. A. Dodge, the leading spirit 
in the board, called upon Elmer S. Dundy 
at Luna Park for advice and general in- 
formation. Mr. Dundy informed the 
Paragon Park man that the cost of run- 
ning the fire show at the Coney 
Island resort was $3,300 weekly. Mr. 
Dodge immediately sent out for gas stoves 
to bring his feet back to their normal 
condition. There is no hope for the rest of 
his fellow directors. 



It is considered likely that West End 
Park at New Orleans will be controlled by 
the traction company in that city this 
summer. C. E. Bray, the booking man- 
ager for the Orpheum circuit, will place 
the attractions. 



The Wenona Beach Park will open June 
1 at Bay City, Mich. The park contains 
the largest casino in the state. W. L. 
Richards is the manager. 



Electric Park in Albany will have only 
vaudeville as usual. 



Toward the spring when the water 
evaporates so that Lagoon Island around 
Albany may again be discovered, work 
will commence and the park placed in 
shape. 



A stock company has been organized by 
Isaac Stevenson of Chicago to establish 
parks at Escanaba, Green Bay, Racine and 
Kenosha this summer. 



Waldameer Park and Four Mile Creek 
Park at Erie, Pa., will open the Sunday 
before Decoration Day. Plans have been 
made for many improvements at these re- 
sorts for the coming season. 



The Brandywine Springs Park at Wil- 
minton, Del., has been rebuilt at a cost 
of $30,000, to repair the loss sustained by 
fire last fall. There is a new scenic rail- 
road, and the B. & O. Railroad is building 
a new station. Many new attractions will 



be added. Vaudeville and minstrels will 
he principally offered in the open air. 
K. W. Crook will be the manager. 



The Zoological Gardens in Cincinnati 
will have Vessella's Italian Band for a 
short period prior to the Chicago engage- 
ment already contracted for. 



Walter ti. Sherlock is attempting to 
promote a Dreamland Park at Kansas 
City, Mo., but the plans are in a chaotic 
state, no actual work having yet been 
started, although the site has been se- 
lected. 



Ramona Park at Grand Rapids, Mich., 
will open May 19 under the management 
of I.. J. Delamater. 



Muskegon, Mich., will have its Lake 

Michigan Park opened this summer by E. 

R. Reed, who will direct it. Mr. Reed is 

connected with the Majestic Theatre in 

-rand Rapids. 



The White City is in process of con- 
struction and May 15 is set as the opening 
date. A new vaudeville theatre will be 
erected and many other attractions se- 
cured. 



The Dominion Park Company in Mon- 
treal expected to have a clear field this 
summer through the Starland Company 
abandoning their proposed enterprise in 
that town. With Riverside Park as active 
opposition, the Dominion crowd will need 
to look about a bit more than they have 
been doing since the Starland's evacuation. 



William Spink, a well known St. Louis 
newspaper man, will act as business man- 
ager of Mannion's Park, the pretty resort 
on the Mississippi river front, this sum- 
mer. A vaudeville bill of seven acts will 
be put on weekly. The opening is set for 
early in May. 



Last Saturday at Dominion Park in 
Montreal in course of construction the 
largest, building collapsed, carrying with 
it about twenty-five of the workmen. 
Twelve were injured. 



Col. John D. Hopkins is in St. Louis 
to arrange for the opening of his Forest 
Park Highlands about the middle of April. 
High class vaudeville will be the chief at- 
traction. 



The Board of Park Commisioners has 
engaged the Oberhoffer band, local, for 
five weeks, beginning February 24, at the 
Lake Harriet pavilion, with Liberati to 
follow with four to six weeks, while Man- 
ager H. A. Dorsey of Wonderland, whose 
second season opens Memorial Day, prom- 
ises to go in strong for band concerts 



Avon Park, at Youngstown, Ohio, will 
open May 27, with high class vaudeville 
and outside attractions. A new covered 
theatre is being built and the half mile 
race track is now completed. Matinees 
will be held on the track throughout the 
summer. This is the fourth successful 
season for Avon Park, all the conces- 
sionaires still remaining. Baldevini's air- 
ship will be the open air attraction the 
first week. 



VARIETY 



13 



CORRESPONDENCE 



BOHEMIANS IN DENVER. 

one more week nearer to New York! Denver la 
a town of which I have heard great reports. The 
< lliuate here is invigorating and certainly builds a 
man up in fine shape. The air Is pure and gives 
one's lungs the cleaning they need after the 
soft coal smoke and other things that enter the 
system on the way westward. I have found many 
familiar faces here, who say they have been 
sent out here by the doctors to die. One New 
Yorker in particular Is Mortimore Greenbaum, fa- 
miliarly known as Jake, who was the private 
secretary to Big Tim Sullivan. Jake was sent 
her to "cash in bis chips," but could not see it 
that way. Jake is stenographer, doorkeeper, chief 
usher and many other things at the Empire The- 
atre, and has gained about 30 pounds in seven 
months. Jak« says the air out here is immense, 
but it is too many miles away from Broadway. 
Notwithstanding the lonesomeness be is experienc- 
ing he is satisfied to stay here. Good luck to 
him, as he is a prince and a great hustler. His 
New York friends ought to drop him a line once 
in a while. Another New York constituent Is 
irauk Taliaferro, better known as "Tally," who 
lias the reputation of having covered more Broad- 
way flagstones than any man in the business. Tally 
is a little hh wed-off chap who came out here not 
for his health but because John Cort made him a 
good enough Inducement to leave the big city. 
Tally says he likes it out here, and will not re- 
turn to good old New York for some time. It Is 
now time to weep. How can we spare him? 

"The Big Scream" show is doing record busi- 
ness here. You will notice that I don't blow my 
horn about the show, but I'll tell you right now 
everybody else is doing the blowing for me, and 
us a result our business is very good. Last Wed- 
nesday I pulled off a "beauty" contest and award- 
ed a diamond ring to the winner, who was selected 
by a corps of newspaper men here. We simply 
packed the house, and to-day the whole town is 
talking about it. The affair was a huge success 
ticca use I had a real live manager, who worked 
it up good and forte. J. E. Clifford Is the man- 
ager's name, and you talk about your "princes" 
— here is the kingpin prince. He is always there 
with a kind word or suggestion, and will go the 
limit. Cliff is an ex-newspaper man, and you 
bet they are the fellows who know how to start 
folks talking and incidentally bring In the shekels. 

Our western trip hss been an enjoyable one for 
all. Ida Nlcolal. who is doing the tough girl 
Roxle with the show, is looked upon ss the best 
exponent of this sort of character. Ida has been 
called by many "a cute little darling," even 
though she makes up to represent a homely looking 
street urchin. The rest of the company are now 
kidding Ida in a shameful manner. They all call 
her "Cutle" and even the dead walls, the stage 
walls and trunks bear chalk inscriptions: "Who 
Is 'Cutle?' " Andy Gardner has made the hit of 
his life, and deserves It. for he never worked 
harder, and ought to got all that is to be handed 
out to a good, conscientious hustler. 

Barney Gerard, the author-manager. Jumps in 
next week to play one of the comedy parts of the 
show, simply as a filler in, as one of the actor 
folks lays off. Barney Is keeping busy, and next 
season will see a number of big affairs pullrd off 
by him. He wrote and produced six successful 
burlesque musical comedies this season alone. 
Keep your eye on him. 

Next week a few one nlghters Into Kansas City. 
Be good. TnE BIG SCREAM. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

MAJESTIC (C. E. Draper, mgr. for Kohl ft 
Cnstlo). — Bessie Clayton, who has not been seen 
here since her connection with the Weber and 
Fields comblnntlon, heads the bill, ner dancing 
won considerable applause. Auguste Von Blene 
followed Miss Clayton for headline honors and 
made a decided hit. Lewis McCord and company 
presented "Her Last Rehearsal." which was seen 
here before. The sketch has been Improved, and 
Is now one of the best In vaudeville. Rice and 
Cady delivered a number of parodies and talked a 
great deal In German dialect. Although they 
went on late on the bill, managed to keep the 
audience in good humor and held them for the 
closing act. The Imitations and stories of Sydney 
Grant made a hit. One of the hits of the bill 
was made by Foy and Clark In "The Modern 
Jonah." which contains novelties seldom exploited 
In sketches. The Five Mowatts, club manipulators, 
received a number of encores. Others on the bill 
were Towell. magician and illusionist: Carlisle and 
Baker, singers and dancers; Baron's dogs; Downey 
and Wlllard In a sketch that pleased: John M. Ir- 
win, trapeze artist; Art Adair, comedian, and Duse 
and Duse. corned v acrobats. 

OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, mgr. for Kohl ft Castle). 
— Edwards Davis and company returned with the 
two-act dramatic sketch. "The Unmasking." which 
was well received. Charley Case made a hit with 
many good stories. Bailey and Austin occupied 
the stage for thirty minutes with their comedy 
acrobatic act, and scored a hit. noch-Elton Com- 
pany repeated their sketch "Mile. Rlecl." which 
pleased, and Avery Straknsch was the recipient 
of much applause after each song. Vernon the 
ventriloquist gave a neat and pleasing perform- 
ance. Herbert's dogs pleased, and Cook and 
Stevens sang and danced Into favor. Innes and 
Ryan made a good Impression with their singing 
and talking act. Luce and Luce made good with 
their musical set, and Edna Whitby, singing 
comedienne. Charles C. Closs and Son and Jackson 
and Wall completed the bill. 

HAYMARKET (W. W. Freeman, mgr. for Kohl 
& Castle).— The bill Is headed ry Emmett Corrlgan 
and company In a sensational dramatic sketch en- 
titled "The Card Party." which made s hi* hit. 
World and Kingston duplicated their former hit. 
Dixon and Anger presented their comedy skit en- 
titled "The Baron and His Friend." and were the 
laughing hit of the bill. The Dnrla Trio sang 
operatic sones. Freydo Brothers are (rood equilib- 
rists, and Probst received hearty applause for his 
clever imitations. Others who appeared and pleased 
were Mills and Morris. Musical Simpsons, the 
Holdsworths. Georgia Charters Lewis. Wolf and 
Wilson. Ed Sawyer, Jordan and Joyce and the 
I^wsnn Sisters. 

INTERNATIONAL (W. S. Cleveland, mgr.).— 



Manager Cleveland a gicaler vaudeville U u credit 
to the management a* well aa a surprise to the 
public. The uiuuy excellent acts booked by Will- 
lam Morris have not beeu seen here before or lu 
the past seasons. The headline attraction this 
week la Virginia Earl and her English Johnnies, 
who deserve the top notch position on the excel- 
lent bill. The act Is refined and coutalus an 
abundance of huuiur, and some good singing hy 
Miss Earl and her male support. Julian Rose made 
his only vaudeville appearance In two years and 
for fifteen minutes the audience laughed. Mr. 
Rose is starring in "Fast Life in New lork," and 
filled lu this week owing to his company laying 
oil a week during Lent. Edward Bloudell pre- 
sented "The Lost Boy" for the first time here 
aud pleased the audience. Le Domino Rouge, the 
girl with the Red Dumluo, who came heralded 
from New York, was a drawing card. Her dance 
is artistically executed and the mirror effect proved 
a novelty. She was assisted by the Eight Shet- 
land*, who appeared in another part of the olio 
in a singing aud dancing specialty. Lulz Brothers 
scored a hit and Weedou's lions gave a thrilling 
aud daring exhibition. George Yeoman managed 
to extract many laughs with his Jokes aud paro- 
dies. The attractions at this bouse will continue 
to be strong, and it is the intention of the man- 
agement to book only the best acts obtainable. 

TROCADEKO (I. M. Welugarteu, mgr.).— M. M. 
Theise'a Wine, Woman and Song company la the 
week's offering, presenting "A Day at Niagara 
Falls" and "Fun in the Subway." Both bur- 
lesques are handsomely staged and costumed. The 
company ia one of exceptional merit and the best 
seen at Tills house. In the olio appeared Howe aud 
Scott and Bonlta with her coons, who made hits. 

NOTES. — Business continues good at the vaude- 
ville aud burlesque houses. S. Morton Cobn of the 
International Compauy sails for Europe April 10 
to secure sensational acts for the company's bouse. 
John W. Considiue, who was in the East last 
week, returned to his home in Seattle. He was 
taken ill while in Chicago, but is improving. Mr. 
Considiue will go to New York with bis family 
in May. Howard Theatre, formerly conducted by 
Lorrin J. Howard as a dramatic stock bouse, has 
changed its policy to vaudeville, under the man- 
agement of A. E. Meyers. The theatre is on the 
North Side. Kathryn Kelly McCord, supported by 
Walter Hanuau, in a playlet entitled "No Man for 
Dinner," will be seen in New York shortly after 
her engagement in South Bend, Ind. Walter Keefe 
has booked the Six Musical Cuttys on a circuit of 
smaller theatres at the same salary the act re- 
ceived In the large cities. George Porter of Minne- 
apolis was in the city last week looking over some 
of the big nets. He has taken an oath that be 
will have some of the high-salaried ones at his 
house as soon as he can get them to sign con- 
tracts. Edward Shayne has moved to New York, 
where he will make his headquarters. He con- 
trols the booking for a great number of parks in 
the large cities. John J. Ryan writes from Cin- 
cinnati that the Olympic Theatre he is building 
there is progressing rapidly, and will probably 
open on schedule time in August, 1007. Mr. Ryan 
Is also looking after the new house in course of 
construction in Buffalo. Hal Merrltt was on the 
bill at the Majestic last week, taking the place 
of an act that did not appear. Kberns and Cole 
are meeting with success In their sketch "The 
Baron." They are booked over the Kohl ft Castle 
circuit. They have several offers to Join musical 
comedies next season. Maude Rockwell, the Cali- 
fornia vocalist, is meeting with success in the 
Middle West. She opens on the Proctor circuit 
later. In the offices of the International Theatri- 
cal Company Chris O. Brown has been promoted 
to the position of general msnager of the Middle 
West. A. E. Myers taking his place in the book- 
ing department. Cameron and Flanagan produced 
their new act entitled "On and Off," and scored 
a hit. Mvles McCarthy and company in "The Race 
Tout's Dream" closed the olio at the Olympic last 
week, and held the attention of the audience until 
the final curtain. Glory Fuller, of the Wine, 
Woman and Song Company, is visiting her children 
In the city. Joseph J. Dowllng and Myra Davis 
are resting this week. They open next week on 
the International circuit. Dixon and Anger are 
preparing their new act. which will be artistic 
in scenic effects and novelties. 

FRANK WIESBERG. 



PITTSBURG, PA. 
THE GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— "The Cir- 
cus Rider," with Miss Eva Taylor as Lady Crof- 
ton. Hugh Ward as Lord Merton and Dennle Har- 
ris as Lord Weldon, Is the headllner. The players 
are Plttshurg favorites through their connection 
with the old Davis Stock, and were enthusiastically 
received. Jack Norwortb's "College Boy" stunt 
did not create much enthusiasm, but the local po- 
litical Jokes and "Wise Old Owl" verses went 
well. Leon Morris' Mammoth Circus Is the finest 
animal act seen here for a long time. Louise 
Dresser, as dainty and pretty as ever, made a hit 
with her "Different Sorts of Girls" song. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mark Murphy, in "The Coal Strike." made 
their usual hit. The Three Macart Sisters gave a 
finished performance. Edwin Mollenhauer, the 
veteran violinist, who Is over eighty years of age, 
was received with earnest attention and apprecia- 
tion. Asra Introduced some new stunts In billiard 
ball Juggling. Delmore and Oneida did some ar- 
tistic posing. Burke and Dempsey, the Three 
Mitchells. Ida O'Day, the Brooks Brothers and the 
pictures complete a well balanced bill; audiences 
big. GAYETY(Jas. E. Orr. mgr.).— Clerk's Jer- 
sey I.llles Extravaganza Company opened to a big 
house. The first skit, "The Disputed Check." li 
from the clever pen of Dan Graeey. who played 
the leading comedy part. In the closing piece. 
"The Two Colonels." a couple of comedians al- 
ternately popped on and off the stage. They looked 
allko. whbh was basis of the fun. The part of 
this skit Which consists in the two chaps sitting 
on a trunk, stuttering and blowing saliva .sup- 
posedly In each other's faces, might well be 
omitted. The olio is very strong. Paul and 
Arthur Bell were given a series of ovations for 
their high class musical numl»ers. The Dlnus 
Troupe of Acrobats, five men and two women, all 
In evening dress, consisted of a number of really 
superior posing and tumbling feats. The Chame- 
roys made a hit ss eccentric athletes, and dis- 
played come marvelous exhibitions of strength. 



Utber Niilnio of the olio were Ada B. Burnett in 
coon songs, Howell aud Emerson, talking, singing 
and dancing comedians; Rena Washburn and Sadie 
Vedder, song and dance artistes, and Toby Zara 
and Violet Stetson, baton manipulators. The en- 
tire cast is excellent and the girls of the chorus 

chic and attractive. ACADEMY (Harry W. 

Williams. Jr., mgr.). — James II. Curtin's Broad- 
way Gaiety Girls is one of the best shows at the 
Academy this season, and is greatly liked by 
packed houses. In place of the two conventional 
burlesques there Is a two-act extravaganza with 
Mildred Stoller as the leading feminine star, and 
John Weber as leading comedian. The name. 
"Glittering Sylvia, or a Trip to the Bottom of the 
Sea," Is indicative of the supposed trip of a lot 
cf girls and funmakers to a mythical kingdom at 
the bottom of the sea, and the scenery is unusually 
elaborate. In the olio the Phillips Sisters were 
well received in singing, and dancing. Jack Mar- 
shall gave some clever imitations and Gardner, 
West and Sunshine gave a comedy sketch, intro- 
ducing Sunshine, the Cuban pickaninny singer and 
dancer, who caught the bouse. John Weber and 
company had a novel act, assisted by a biograph, 
the Famous Melrose Troupe did some thrilling 
acrobatic feats and Patterson and Kennette. in 
tbeir sketch, "Get Off the Plate," created many 
laughs. MADAME PITT. 



The Chas. K. Harris Courier 

Derosa to the imeri$U at avagt *ud oiuguv 
Address all communications to 
CHAS. K. HARRIS. 31 W. 81st St., N. Y. 
(Meyer Cohen, Mgr.) 



Vol. 1. 



New York, Murch 10, 1000. 



No. D. 



CINCINNATI, 0. 

COLUMBIA (M. C. Anderson, mgr.).— An ex- 
ceptionally good show, playing to capacity. Adair 
and Dabn, slack wire artists, big hit; Phil Gott- 
bold and Joslc Klne, in "A Medical Discovery." 
big hit; Esmeralda Sisters, assisted by the Four 
Flower Girls, in a singing and dancing act, big hit; 
James F. Macdonald, singing comedian and racon- 
teur, scored a hit; Fanny Rice, introducing her 
dancing dolls, was the real hit on the bill; Clif- 
ford aud Burke, minstrel comedians, were great; 
Charles R. Sweet, as the burglar musician, saves 
the turn with his piano playing; Baader-La Velle 
Trio, comedy acrobatic cyclists, put up one of the 
best acts of Its kind seen here. Next week, 
Harry Corson Clarke and company in "Strategy," 
Grand Opera Trio, Clayton Kennedy aud Mattie 
Rooney in "The Happy Medium," Marvelous Frank 
and Bob. Lucy and Lucier, Alice Lyndon Doll 

and William Gould and Valeska Suratt. 

STANDARD (Chas. M. Arnold, mgr.).— In the 
Trocadero Burlesquers Manager Waldron has an 
aggregation that will prove a star attraction at 
the burlesque bouses. The first burlesque, "The 
Misfit Family," with Charles Belmont, Jack Boyce, 
George B. Scanlon. Ben Walker, Anna Hill, Mae 
Taylor, Pearl Stevens, Grace Graham, Daisy Leroy, 
Frankie Lewis and John Thorndlkc, made a great 
hit. The chorus was pretty, well costumed aud in 
good voice. In the olio were Mae Taylor, up to 
date songs, good; Frank and Grace Graham, Illus- 
trated songs, hit; Charles Mackle and Ben Walker 
In "Scenes from Everyday Life," big bit; Brlnn, 
Juggler and feats of strength, big hit; the Wil- 
sons, singers and dancers, hit. The closing bur- 
lesque "Fun at the Hotel Astorbilt," was enjoy- 
able, but rough and of the slapstick order. Next 
week, Jersey Lilies Extravaganza Co. and Graeey 
and Riimey. Rawson and Clare, Howell and Em- 
merson, the Musical Bells, Zaro and Stetson, the 
Chameroys and Washburn and Vedder. PEO- 
PLE'S (James E. Fennessy, mgr.). — Innocent 
Maids Company, T. W. Dink Ins. mgr. The per- 
formance began with the burlesque, "Struck by a 
Cyclone," with Charles H. Boyle, Eugene Jerge, 
John Moran, Ed Markey, Juck Elliott, May Milton, 
Mazie Aleeue and Gus Milton, good. The chorus 
was handsomely costumed. In the olio were 
Eugene Jerge. illustrated songs, big hit; the 
Medallion Trio, musicians and singers, good; 
Aleene and Hamilton, ginger girls, good; Markey 
and Moran, singers and dancers, good; Deonzo 
and Elliott, barrel Jumpers, big hit; James Wal- 
thour and company, bicycle act, racing against 
horse, good. The closing burlesque, "Stranded," 
was tiresome. Next week. Dreamland Burlesquers. 
Extra feature, the Six Empire Girls. 

H. HESS. 



ALBANY, N. T. 

PROCTORS (Howard Graham, res. mgr.).— 
Packed houses. Week of 12: Josephine Cohan and 
company presented "Friday the 13tb," which was 
well received. "Primary No. 23," a one-act 
musical entertainment by Gus Edwards, went well. 
Mattie Keeue and company presented a new com- 



Miss VIRGINIA CAM- 
ERON, a young Call- 
f o r n 1 a soprano, is 
about to enter vaude- 
ville. She Is the pos- 
seiuMtr of a remarkably 
clear and beautiful so- 
prano voice, and will 
surely be heard from 
in vaudeville. Her se- 
lections are "Just One 
Word of Consolation," 
"The Belle of the 
Ball" and "Dreaming 
Love of You," which 
she sings with telling 
effect. 

IOS. E. HOWARD, who 
Is now closing his last 
few weeks in bur- 
lesque, Introduced a 
new song at the 
Dewey Theatre, en- 
titled "WON'T YOU 
BE MY G 1 R L I E," 
which has no doubt 
created the biggest 
seusatlon that has 
ever been seen or 
heard in the Dewey 
Theatre since its ex- 
istence. He has had 
to respond to ten and 
twelve encores at each 
performance. While 
the song la not pub- 
lished as yet, there 
hasn't been a perform- 
ance where there 
wereu't from five to 
ten people at the 
stage door requesting 
Mr. Howard for a copy 



of the song, which be 
was unable to give 
them, aa the copies 
are now in press and 
will he ready for 
everybody by the time 
tills paper is issued. 
There is no doubt that 
Mr. Howard baa a 
bigger hit in this song 
tiian his famous 
"Hello. Ma Baby" 
and "Good-bye. My 
Lady Love." Profes- 
sional copies now 
ready. Do not fail to 
get it at once, as you 
can duplicate Mr. 
Howard's success with 
the catchiest song that 
will be issued for the 
Summer season. 

AL LI BIN, our hustling 
professional represent- 
ative, has dressed 
himself In his "hus- 
tling clothes" and Is 
now resdy to teach 
the Harris songs at 
all the Summer re- 
aorta, wherever he 
may be needed. There 
1 s n o question but 
what Lubln is person- 
ally acquainted with 
more professionals 
than any one in the 
business, and It la 
uever sny trouble for 
him to pick up hut 
fiddle and teach songs 
st any and all times. 



edy playlet entitled "Bambooxle," which was writ- 
ten by Ella Wheeler Wilcox. It Is s typical 
Western act, aud the audleuce enjoyed It. Fred 
Nlblo, humorist, was excellent. Ollie Young and 
Brother, hoop rollers, repeated their former suc- 
cesses. Ben Meyer, equlllbrlstlc marvel, a bit. 
Ray Cox, comedienne, waa good. Cellna Bobe, ex- 
pert violinist, well received. Closed with motion 
pictures. Coming week of 10: Dan McAvoy, Fields 
aud Ward. Violet Black, Tenjl Troupe, Tanner 
and Gilbert, Mine. Colgrove's Animals, Lulgl Del 
Oro and Major Doyle. MARTEL. 

BUFFALO, N. T. 
SHEA'S (M. Shea, mgr.).— Bill for week of 12 
was not up to the Shea atandard. Callahan and 
Mack, lu their sketch "The Old Neighbor," wers 
well received; Rice and Cohen, in "All the World 
Loves a Lover," were a big laughing bit; Harry 
Atkinson was poor in imitations of musical in- 
struments; the Kauffman Troupe scored a hit In 
an exceptionally good bicycle act. Alfred Arnea- 
sen, Burton aud Brooks, Berths Waltsluger, Emms 
Francis and the Klnetograpb completed the bill. 
Week 10 Includes Louise Guunlng, Eddie Leonard, 
Smith aud Cumpbell, Fetching Brothers, Sbean 
aud Warren. Leon Morris' ponies snd the Klneto- 
grapb. LAFAYETTE (Chas. M. Baggs, mgr.). 

— The Fay Foster company gave a poor perform- 
ance week of 12. Chevalier De Lorls. an extra 
attraction, waa by far the best. Keno, Welsh and 
Montrose were very good; Cushman and St. 
Clair, fairly good; Herbert and Willing, poor; 
Louie Dacre was a bit with the audlencea. Week 

of 19: The Brigadiers. GARDEN (Ed J. Carr, 

mgr.). — John L. Sullivan drew big business week 
of 12 for the Bowery Burlesquers. The show Is 
fairly good. In the olio: Estelle Wills, fslr; Jug- 
gling Bannans would have a good club Juggling 
act If they did not mlsa so often; Carmelette 
D'Elcedere. good; Roberts, Hayes and Roberta, act 
fair, dancing good; Hickman Brothera, fairly good; 
Ben Jansen was a big applause winner. Week 19, 
European Sensation Burlesquers. TEMPLE (T. 



VARIETY THEATRES OF GREATER NEW YORK 

MANHATTAN. 

ATLANTIC GARDEN, Bowery Concert 8 **• **• 

ALHAMBRA. 7tb Ave. snd 125th St Vsudevllle 2 and 8 P. M. 

CIRCLE. Broadway and 60th St Burlesque 2 snd 8 P. E 

COLONIAL. Brosdwsy snd 63d St Vsudevllle 2 and 8 P. M. 

DEWEY, 14th 8t Burlesque 2 and 8 P. ML 

FAMILY. Eaat 125th St Vaudeville 2 aud 8 P. M. 

GOTHAM, East 125th St Burlesque 2 aud 8 P. ML 

HURT1G A SEAMON'8, West 125th St Vaudeville 2:30 and 8:30 P. M. 

HAMMERSTEIN'S. Timea Sq Vaudeville 2 snd 8 P. si. 

HUBER'S. Uth St Museum Continuous. 

HIPPODROME. 6th Ave. snd 44th 8t Variety 2 and 8 P. M. 

KEITHS, 14th St Vaudeville Continuous. 

LONDON. Bowery Burlesque 2 and 8 P. ML 

MINER'S BOWERY, Bowery Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

MINER'S 8TH AVE., 8th Ave. snd 27th 8t Burlesque 2 and 8 P. M. 

PALACE, Amsterdam Ave Vaudeville 2 and 8 P. M. 

PASTORS, 14th St Vaudeville Continuous. 

PROCTOR'S 6STI1 STREET, 3d Ave snd 58th 8t. Vaudeville 2:16 and 8:15 P. M. 

PROCTORS 23D STREET, West 23d St Vaudeville 2:16 and 8:15 P. M. 

BROOKLYN. 

AMPHION, Bedford Ave Vsudevllle 2:15 snd 

ALCAZAR. Washington St Burlesque 2 and 8 

GAIETY, Broadway Burlesque 2 and 8 

GOTHAM. East New York Vaudeville 2 and 8 

HYDE A BEHMAN. Adams St Vsudevllle 2 snd 8 

IMPERIAL. Fulton St Vsudevllle 2 and 8 

KEENEY'S. upper Fulton St Vaudevllls 2 15 snd 

NASSAU. Wllloughby St Burlesque 2 and 8 

NOVELTY, Drlgga Ave Vsudevllle 2 and 8 

ORPHEUM, Fulton St Vsudevllls 2:16 and 

STAR, Jay 8t Burlesque 2 snd 8 

UNIQUE, Grand St Burlesque 2 and 6 



8:16 P. M. 
P. M. 
P.M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 
P. M. 
8:16 P. M. 
P. M. 
P. ML 

8:16 P. M. 
P. ML 
P. ML 



14 



VARIETY. 



Tuggart, mgr.). — Business Increased week of 
over tliut of the opening week. A very good 
offered. Frank Melvln'a Auliual Circus 
La Auto Olrl scoring heavily. Hill for 
19; Ctoforth and Doyle. Harry Halniou, 
Sisters, Sabine and Dale, Lamont and 
and Seymour'* comedy dogs. LINN'S 



W. 
12 

Mil was 
and the 
week of 
Clare Ace 
Tuulet te 

MUSEUM (Dr. Hugh J. Linn. iugr.).— Business 
continues good. MIlo Vagge In a bag punching act 
and Gertrude Stanley, a chariulng souhrctte, pos- 
sessing a pleasing voice, were the hits of the bill 
week 12. CHAS. W. GOETZ. 

BURLINGTON, IA. 
GARRICK (Vic. Hugo, uigr.).— Bill for week 
of March 12 was an exceptionally strong one, 
headed by Fibber and Johnson, a clever team of 
cyclists. The Oukuras Japanese acrobats did some 
good stunts. Kresko and Connelly, in their com- 
edy, "What Will Happen Next?" was well re- 
ceived. Nellie Hevell as a laugh producer was a 
treat. Vesta M out rone made a hit with her il- 
lustrated song. Biograph closes. CiUAND 

(Cbauiberlln and Harrington. 
Al G. Fields* Minstrels gave 

to S. R. O. NOTE.— D. K. 

the I -a Salle at Keokuk. Iowa, 
visitor iu this city last week. 



mgrs.). — March 12. 

an excellent show 

Reeves, manager of 

was a business 

D. T. C. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 
MONUMENTAL (Jos. L. Kernan. mgr.).— Week 
March 12, Miner's Merry Burlesquers, to good 
business. Performance above the average. The 
opening burletta. "A Night on the Bowery." tl 
brimful of music and comedy, and Is followed by 
a strong olio. Miss Jeanette Dupree was suffering 
from a severe cold and was hardly the Dupree of 
old. Niblie and Bordouex were well received, as 
were the LaJoy Brothers, comedy acrobats. TTie 
act of Orover, Hlgglns and Bergman, singers and 
• lancers, was par excellence. Billy Noble, the 
Dixie Boy. rendered coon songs in good style. The 
performance closed with the comedy, "A Jumble 

of Nonsense," introducing the entire company. 

OAYETY (W. L. Ballauf. mgr.).— Week March 
12. Weber & Bush's Parisian Widows, to large 
houses. The opening comedy. "The Carnival at 
Monte Carlo," Is fair and gives Ben Welch ample 
<hance to display his accomplishments. The olio 
comprises Owley and Bandall in their success, 
"Tumbling Tom;" Hounn and Kearney were only 
fair; Sisters Valmore, good: Ben Welch, Hebrew 
characteristics: the Musical Keltons and Charnilon, 
who carried off the honors of the evening. The 
performance closes with the burletta. "A Day 
In Camp," introducing a lot of new and catchy 
songs. Max Mueller, champion wrestler, is meet- 
ing all comers, and forfeits $«'."> to any one whom 
he falls to throw in 18 minutes. Mr. Tom Miner, 
of New York, Is on a visit here In the Interest of 
Miner's Merry Burlesquers. I. I.OWENSTEIN. 



ERIE, PA. 

l'ABK (M. Rels, mgr.).— Good vaudeville con- 
tinues here. For the week March 12 the Faust 
family of acrobats were headliners. Phil Bado 
and Jessie Bertman carried off second honors with 
their sketch "The New Olrl;" Annie Oladle, songs 
aud stories, good; Joe Byron and May Blanch In 
a sketch "Matrimonial Sweets In Family Jars," 
clever; Creseeut Comedy Four won many recalls; 
Tommy Burnes, with his Illustrated songs and 
the Parkoscopc, conclude the bill. Business good. 

L. T. BERLINER. 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 
TEMPLE OF VAUDEVILLE (F. E. Stonder, 
mgr.). — Bills continue to increase in excellence, 
and business Is S. R. O. The major number this 
week was Martha Florraine's animals, which 
scored heavily. Ada Lewis was second liest. and 
her songs won applause. The Ramsey Sisters were 
well received. Lucy and Lucier have a fair com- 
edy act. Clark dandy, monologist, and Nina Bar- 
bour In the Illustrated songs were well liked. 
Pictures close the show. Week Match 12. 8 Bed- 
ouin Arabs, Alice Lewis, Will Eske. Nnblette 
and Marshall, Lewis and Chapln and Nina Bar- 
bour. DE WITTE. 

FORT WORTH, TEX. 

MAJESTIC ((has. R. Fisher, res. mgr.).— Week 
5. Best week's business the house has ever had, 
and every numlter a pronounced hit. Damm Broth- 
ers, hand and head balancing, best ever seen here. 
Swor Brothers, blackface singers and dancers, an 
ovation. Lamont's cockatoos were well trained 
and pleased. Herbert Mitchell, singer and story 
teller, was well received. Myers and Rosa, disc 
manipulators, were pood. Jane Courthope and 
Company In "It Might Have B ee n .*' were very 
good, but not as pleasing as in their recent sketch. 
Illustrated songs and motion pictures. Next 
week: Dixon and Fields, Simmons and Harris, 
Bellelalre Brothers. Lavlnla Dewltt. Mons. Paulo 
and Mile. Marlow In "A French Frappe." Arling- 
ton and Helston. TARRANT. 



FOND DU LAC, WIS. 

IDEA (M F. Carpenter, res. mgr.V La Dent, 
comedy Juggler; Marguerite Shannon, soubrette: 
Hart and Delmar, comedy sketch; Williams and 
Gordon, comedians, last half of week; Wells ami 
Sells, comedy Jugglers, Griersnn Sisters, Fields and 
Hughes, comedy sketch. Williams ami Gordon held 
over from first of week. Sheck Brothers feature. 

M. C. FLOOD. 

FALL RIVER. MASS. 

SAVOY (Geo. Albert Haley, mgr.).— We-k 
March 12. a crowded bouse greeted an Interesting 
bill. Crossy ami Dayne. in 'Town Hall To -night." 
easily win *lie big type distinction: Byers and Her- 
man made a hit with their act; Stuart, the Male 
I'sttl, still keens them guessing; the Bellboy Trio 
are fair dancers, hut their singing Is weak: Helen 
Keimer has a clever monologue; LeRoy and Le- 
vanion are rood, as are Youngs and Itrooks. musi- 
cians. xheedy's rc. E. Cook, mgr.).— Fred 

K arno's company Is playing n return engagement; 
Archie Boyd pleased all with Ids dainty little 
sketch, "After Many Years;" the I.avlne Cimarron 
Trio of French acrobats were good; the McLaln 
Sisters are good dancers: Billy Johnson and his 
<'re'»le Belle- made a failure; Eekhoff and Gordon 



pleased the gallery; Opiscope wouud up the bill. 

S. R. O. all week. BOSTON (Charles Schlosln 

ger. mgr.) — The attraction this week is the Novel- 
ty Burlesquers, The olio consists of Felix Martin, 
the Cairmens, Helen Jewell and Monsieur Bouette, 
Ethel Heath and Miss Bessie Dyle. 

BON TON. 
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE (■* C. Burroughs, 
local mgr.).— Week March 11. The Petit Fam- 
ily, acrobats, score strongly; Leonhardt, comedy 
Juggler, went well: Roys* und Prone*, singing 
and dancing, do good work; Frozluu, who plays 
an accoicllaii, and the De Laeeys, blackface com- 
edy, were well received. Peter Smith sang the 11 
lust rated songs and the pictures closed. 
SMITHS OPERA HOUSE (Mrs. W. B. Smith, 
prop, and mgr.) — Week March 11. The California 
Oirls scored heavily with two burlesques, "Palm 
Beach, Florida." and "The Great White Way." 
The cdio pleased. Friday, amateur night, boxing 
bouts us an extra. Next week: the Dainty Paree 
Burlesquers. H. HALLMAN. 



HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 

MAJESTIC (Fred Raleigh, mgr.).— Week March 
5. Lillian Chick was advertised to perform a 
wonderful feat. The act is called the Hazardous 
Loop, but a child cau do the so-called wonderful 
act. The bicycle Is attached to a crauk so that 
she cannot fall. Pete Baker seemed to please. 
Mclutyre and Backus, blackface comedians, need 
new material. Arneta, billed as the celebrated 
Parisian danseuse, made a hit. She Is a clever 
dancer. Warren and Brock way. musical com- 
edians, need new material. They are clever 
musicians, but their jokes need polishing up. War- 
ren and Lakewood are clever dancers. 

"ODLANIR." 



HARTFORD, CONN. 
HARTFORD OPERA HOUSE (J. J. Jennings, 
mgr.).— March 14-17. Williams and Dermody. 
sinters and wooden shoe dancers, good; Dick and 
Alice McAvoy have a pleasing sketch entitled "The 
Pride of Newspaper Row;" Johnny Johns, the 
Dixie Boy. pleased; Seymour and Hill, comedy 
acrobats, were funny; Newell aud Niblo, In a 
musical act, did some tine work; Mr. and Mrs. 
Sidney Drew, In their new sketch, "When Two 
Hearts Are Won," were easily the headliners; 
Cooper and Robinson, colored comedians, fair; 
Henry and Alice Taylor, a European act, has some 
remarkable sharpshootlng aud some clever balanc 

lug. POLLS (Louis E. Kilby, mgr.).— Week 

Mai cli 12. Leo Carillo, the California mimic, good; 
Carter. Walters and company, in "The Wise Mr. 
form," a very pleasing farce; Violet Black and 
company In the military sketch, "A West Point 
Regulation," were line and delighted the large 
audience; Adaminl and Taylor, the Wandering 
Minstrels, pleased; Jewell's mannikins and electric 
theatre delighted the children and received the 
same reception as when they played here last 
\ear; Neff and Miller, blackface comedians, were 
lair; Victor's Royal Venetian Band was the head- 
liner; elect rogruph closed. 

WILLIAM II. RHODES. 



HOBOKEN, N. J. 

EMPIRE (A. M. Bruggemann, mgr.).— Bill 
week 12. Four Lukens, aerial artists, great; 
Grand Opera Trio, Blanche La Vigne, Henry Bar- 
ron and Sig. Abramoff, excellent; Raymond and 
(dverly In "Twiddle iSvaddle," big hit; Jack 
Mason's Five Society Belles, O. K.; Julia Kings- 
ley and Nelson Lewis, "After the Honeymoon," 
good; O. K. Sato, comic Juggling, pleased; Doh- 
c-rty's Poodles, pleased; Ethel Robinson, singing 
net, fair; Klnetograph. Business Hue. Next 
week: Holcombe, Curtis and Webb, Lillian Shaw, 
Hawthorne aud Burke, Evans and Mills, Herr 
sanmi, Leslie's porcine circus. Hodges and Launch- 
mere and Bplssel Brothers and Mack. 



HOUSTON, TEX. 
MAJESTIC.— Week March 5. bill includes Otura 
Japanese troupe of four child acrobats, went well; 
Kleko and Frigoll, grnnd opera singers, good; 
Rswl ami Von Kaufman, In sketch, laughing hit; 
Howlson, bird warbler, pleased; oull and Johnson, 
singing and dancing, well received: Son Matthews, 
singing comedienne, several encores; clever Con- 
key, Dutch and Juggling act, good. 

F. E. HERMAN. 



popular songs in an effective way. Barr and Evans 
appear as comedy character creators and receive 

several luughs. CENTURY (Joseph Barrett, 

mgr.). — Miner's Americans did big business week 
March 11, with Cunningham, or Cunning, the Jail 
Breaker, as the chief attraction. The hurlettas 
are amusing ami well staged. The chorus is well 
trained. Olio Includes Joe Goodwin, monologue; 
Fisher and Clark, sketch artists; May Butler, 
Mings; p.( tts, Reynolds aud Fox, sketch; Break- 
away Barlows, acrobats. Week March IS, Miner's 

Bohemians. MAJESTIC (Fred Waldinanu, mgr.). 

Manchester's CreekerJaCkera did good business 
week March 11 with first part, "The Razzlc Dazzle 
Girls." The last part, "Nature In Marble Hall," 
went big with the audiences. Olio Includes Lillian 
Held, singer; Charles and Anna Glocker, sketch; 
llennlngs, Lewis and Hcnnlngs, sketch; Shepard 

Camp, singer. Week March 18, Casino Girls. 

YALE'S (Lloyd Brown, mgr.).; — Vaudeville to good 
business week 11, with Yorke and Herbert Trio, 
.Jennie DeWeese, Thelma DaVerue, Ethel Vane and 

Harold Gould. NATIONAL (Dr. F. L. Flanders, 

mgr.). — Vaudeville with excellent business week 
11, with Jerry Herzell, Charles Cubln, Brandon 
and Harvey. James A. Hennessy, Morris Jones and 
Weston and West. FA1RPLAY. 



LOOANSPORT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Ilardle, res. mgr.). — Business 
week March 5 smashed all previous records. Bill 
week March 12 includes Stapleton and Chaney, 
jugglers, good; Relly and Morgan, pleased; Le 
Roy Benson and company, musical artists, well 
received; illustrated songs, Kluodroine, etc., 
tilled out an acceptable -bill; business good. March 
IS, Giles W. Harrington, the Hlrschorus, Thos. R. 

Reaty and Maud Beall Price and others. 

NOTES.— Boyd Park, one of the finest In the 
State, will open its regular summer season June 
11. Bergman Park, in the heart of the city, will 
commence operations last of May. The street rail- 
way orticlals are planning for ten weeks of vaude- 
ville at Spencer Park, commencing about June 1. 
Logsnsport'a much talked-of new vaudeville tem- 
ple, the Lyric, seems to be "only a dream of the 
golden future" at present. The prospects of two 
parks, together with the Dowling and Crystal bid- 
ding for summer patronage, evidently forced a 
ease of cold feet on local capital which was behind 
the project, though It Is predicted that the bouse 
will surely "get In the tine water" the coming 
fall. Messrs. Amnions and Dubois have leased the 
old Haiti r Opera House at Wabash, Ind., mid will 
open it t»s a Crystal March 20. The Amnions and 
Dubois circuit of ten Crystal theatres Is meeting 
with phenomenal success. Every house in tbe 
chain is a big winner and will continue to run 
during the coming summer. The Toledo house 
opens next month, and eventually this firm will 
emeu other houses In the larger cities of the Mid- 
dle West. Speaking of the success of this new 
linn brings to mind the fact that less than two 
years BfO John II. Amnions, with his "dudelet" 
turn, counted himself fortunate indeed to secure a 
straight ten weeks' engagement. REVILO. 



INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (Shafer Zicgler, Mgr.). 

Edwin Stevens deserved all the applause he re- 
ceived during the week of March 12 at the Grand. 
A more versatile entertainer has never ln»en seen 
here In vaudeville. The Five PlrocofBl gave an ex- 
cellent Juggling act. which suffered somewhat, 
however, from Its similarity to the act of the 
Agoiist Family, who played the Grand two weeks 
before. Alice Lyndon Doll, the little Indianapolis 
singing comedienne, was given a royal welcome to 
her home town. The Marco Twins caused much 
laughter, and Kennedy and Rooney gave a Sketch 
in which their singing, dancing and piano playing 
far exceeded In merit their dialogue. Barnnld's 
Dogs and Monkeys were enjoyed. Horsky, Bergere 
and company presented a weak sketch. Rudolph 
Horsky and Leons Bergere ure players of much 
ability and would do well In a suitable vehicle. 
Next week the Grand gets James T. Powers and 
company as headliners and L.nlnla Shannon as 
an added featjire. Miss Shannon Is a great favor- 
ite bere, having been the leading lady of the old 
Grand Opera House stock Company, 

LOUIS WESLYN. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.) .—Good 
business unci well balanced bill week March 11. 
The Mysterious Howards have a very Interesting 
act wherein thought transmission plays a promi- 
nent part. Mitchell and Cain have a very ener- 
getic dialogue. The Eight Allisons are above the 
average ns acrobatic tumblers, Frank Rea and 
QtiMle Brnsche appear in a sketch. "A Woman of 
Few Words." Armstrong and Holly have an 
amusing bit. "The Rxprrfti ■man." Flo Adlcr sings 



LOUISVILLE. KY. 

HOPKINS (Wm. Reichmann, res. mgr.).— The 
Great Lafayette Is the drawing card for this 
week, and he Is proving a strong magnet. Others 
who serve to divide attention with Lafayette are 
the Okabe Troupe of Japs; Misses Delmore present 
a good musical act. and Keno, Walsh and Melrose 
introduce a comedy acrobatic novelty. PRIN- 
CESS RINK. — Kinzo, the Jap, presenting Jug- 
gling on roller skates, drew crowds lust week and 
pleased his audiences. Renowned Rev. is are 
underlined as the attraction for week of March 19. 

ARTHUR STUART. 



LOS ANOELES, CAL. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, nig.-.).— Week March 
.">. Herrmann the Groat leads the bill this week, 
with Lew Sully an extra attraction. The rest of 
the bill includes the Seldom* ; Rosa I re and Dor- 
retto; Roy Knnlienshue. the airship Inventor, with 
moving pictures of ids new ship; Mignonette 
Koklm; Lei Aubers; Galletti's monkey circus, and 
tbe biograph. Phenomenal business. EMPIRE 
(Rillv Banks, mgr.).— Earl and Wilson, musical 
artists; J. Frank Ely. In monologue; Jeanne 
Brooks, "The Girl with the Smile." formerly of 
Purcell and Brooks; Laura Banks, with Illustrated 
Songs, and the Empire Stock Company In farce- 
comedy. Good business. FISCHER'S ( E. A. 
Fischer, mgr.).— Harry James company still at 
this house, putting on farce comedy, and are 
booked Indefinitely. The vaudeville portion of the 
bill this week consists of Carlisle and Stanley, 
in a comedy wire act. Big business. UNIQUE 
(Hens and Bailee, mgrs.).— This house Is doing a 
good business. The bill Is beaded by Musical 
Bentley with bis xylophone. Others on the bill are 
Leon!, on the silver rings; the Campbells, comedy 
musical act. and Miller Bakon. in illustrated songs. 
Moving pictures follow, and the Unique Stock 
Company, In "Dr. Baxter's Youth Restorer." close 
the show. STAR (Rube Welch, mgr. ) .—Welch's 
Burlesque Company bold the boards. The vaude- 
ville Includes Donhltt and Jones and Monte Carter 
In monologue. 



LAWRENCE. MASS. 

COLONIAL (II. Fred Lees, nigr.1. The bill for 
week March 12 Includes Mr. and Mrs. Fred Lucier 
In "A Rustic Romeo," Lillian Seville, singing 
comedienne; Red ford and Winchester, burlesque; 
Canity Sisters, singing and dancing specialty, 
Mme. Adelaide Herrmann, necromancy and illu- 
sions; Edward Gray, tall tale-telling tad and 
Mareena. Nevaro and Mareena. acrobatic comedy. 
Coming, week March 10, Cressy and Dayne In 
"Town Hall To-night." Stuart, the Male Pattl: 
Byers and Herman, t lie Bellboy Trio, LeRoy and 

LeVanlon. Youngs ami Brooks. Helen Relmer. 

NOTES. — Charnilon. the trapeze performer, left 
tills city with her manager, Philip H. Welter, on 
the loth, having been confined at her hotel since 
her appearance at the Colonial the week of Feb. 
ID, She underwent two operations, and Is now 
fully recovered She hooked to play at Baltimore 
the week of March 12 and at Lowell the week fol- 
lowing. . George B. Alexander, the high toned 
hobo, played the Colonial week of March 15. On 



Cobb's Corner 



No 3 . A Weekly Word With WILL tho Wordwright. 

SATURDAY, MARCH 17TH, 1906. 

CEADE-MELIA FALTHA 

Engagements solicited for 

THE TIN-PAN ALLEY QUARTETTE. 

Bartley C. Costello, Basso. 

Andrew B. Sterling, 1st Tenor. 
Will D. Cobb, Barytone. 

Ed. Oardinier, 2nd Tenor. 

SEND IN AT ONCE FOR MY NEW SONG, 

Another Good Old Summer Time. 

"Waltz Me Around Again Vvillle." 

Words by Will I). Cobb. Music by Ron Shields. 

CHORUS. 
Wultz me around again Willie, around, around, 

around; 
The music is dreamy, it's peaches and creamy; 
Oh. don't let my feet touch the ground. 
I feel like a ship on an ocean of Joy, 
I Just want to holler out loud ship ahoy! 
Don't let the band stop. 
Let me dance till I drop. - 
Oh, oh, Willie! Just waltz me around. 

Copyright 1900. 

WILL D. COBB 

Wordwright, 48 W. 29th St., New York City. 



Thursday, 8, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander celebrated 
the fourth anniversary of their wedding, assisted 
by old friends, who were with them on the bill. 

A. B. C. 

LYNN, MASS. 

AUDITORIUM (Hurry Kstses, mgr.).- Brothers 
Darras, In a sensational Hying trapeze act, get the 
black type for week March 12, a clever act: Pet* 
Dailey and his Lu Lu Girls failed to score; Maddux 
and Melvln In "At the Station" scored a hit; Gil- 
day and Fox ( Hebrew comedians, went big; Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Thome and company were well 
liked; Tuscott. coon ahOUter, was well received; 
Van and A Men In "The New Bellboy" went very 
well. Business not so heavy during Lent. 

DAVE CHASE. 

LONDON, ONT. 
BENNETTS {J. H. Aloz, uigr.). the bill Ibis 
week is only good in spots. Coin's pautoiuiuie dogs 
are a hit. Seymour und Dupree ure high In favor 
and present some remarkable high Jumping. 
Harry Ilolman pleases with a fair monologue. Gill 
and Talbot offer a sketch with a touch of pathos. 
The Pay ton Trio, a colored act. Is very poor. The 
Gardner children presented ■ sketch entitled "The 
Theatrical Agent." it serves merely to Introduce 
some fair singing ami dancing. NOTE. — Much 
speculation lias been aroused as to who will con- 
trol the Springbunk Park Theatre liere. The 
Sloddart Stock Company, who presented repertoire 
there last season, are making a hid for the priv- 
ileges, it is understood that the street railway 
company are also after It. Several privileges have 
been let to Individuals by the city to run merry- 
go rounds, a miniature railway and other such 
amusements. A scenic railway would pay here, 
but local capital is somewhat slow in coming to 
the front where a considerable outlay Is required. 
The privilege Of running a "penny arcade" with 
various slot machines in the Casino could l>e had. 
It would be a sure money maker. London has a 
population of over 42.000. and as yet cannot boast 
of an amusement parlor. The first one here will 
make a mint of money for its owner. 

FRITZ HOUSTON. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 

SOHMER PARK (I). La Rose, mgr.). -Week 
March 12. This house presented a strong vaude- 
ville bill. Played to capacity — 4,000 — at Imth per- 
formance*. Lsvtgne's band Is ft strong number. 
Rae and Benedetto, In aerial trapeze ami ladder 
net, took well, the suspended contortion work 
being a feature. E. De Voe, tramp comedian, 
won applause. Frank Moclnn. local trapeze ecpill 
ibrist. made ■ hit. Tommle Tat lock. Iocs! clog 
dancer, took the house with his songs and long 
shoe dancing, 'Hie Geolys, eccentric- duetttsts and 

dancers, took well. Pictures closed the show. 

ROYAL cll.C. Egertoi gr. \ . -Week 12. Whallen 

and Marteil's Kentucky Belles. The feature was 
the marvelous baud to hand acrobatic work of the 
four Brothers Melvln. Hendricks and Prescott, 
singers and dancers, took well. Gray and Graham 
have a good musical act. Relcl and Carrol, vocal- 
ists and comedians, made a hit. The comedy 
"Murphy's Mistakes," In two acts, introduced new 
songs by the company, and gave the Century 
Comedy Quartette (Shaw, Hortoti, (Jiilnn and Car- 
roll) a chance to make a hit. Next week: Wlinllen 
Brothers ami Marteil's Merrymakers Extravaganza 

Company. NOTES. — Eddie De Voe, of Baker, 

De Voe and Hammer, Is working a few weeks 
ah.ne on account of an accident to Mr. Hammer 
at the Gotham. New York, recently. The trio 
is booked with the Porepaugb & Sells Circus for 
coming season. Frank Mochon, aerial trapeze, Is 
considering contracts between Louis Cyr's canvas 
vaudeville and Robinson's Circus for the coming 
season. A new small vaudeville house In Mon- 
treal is the Gymnase Music Hall. Hernias, gen- 
eral manager; Joseph Bedard, manager; Ben Davis, 
musical director. It Is In the theatre centre of 
city: capacity Not); shows at 2 and 8; full or 
chest ra. Will use ten people. 

AL M. PRENTISS. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.).— Lent 
is getting in some of its fine work on local play- 
houses, but the Orpheiitn opened this week to the 
usual capacity business with a big laughing bill. 
Watson. Hutchlns, Edwards and company are the 
fame scream In their "Vaudeville Exchange;" 
Sydney Deane and company had a hard time get 
ting away from Blackwell's Island and the audi- 
ence, which latter Is keenly appreciative of really 



\ 



VARIETY 



i5 



AN ALL STAR CAST 

IS THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE 

YORK INQUIRER 



IT INCLUDES 



JOHN W. KELLER 

WILLIAM G. NICHOLAS 

HAMILTON L. MARSHALL 

CHARLES ALFRED BYRNE 

"CHOLLY KNICKERBOCKER" 
R E. RAYMOND 



CHARLES E. TREVATHAN 

LEANDER RICHARDSON 
and others 



The Publication, issued Sundays, treats of Society, Wall Street 
Politics, Racing, Sports, Automobiling, Theatres and miscellaneous 
matters and it is essentially 



n 



A Smart Paper for Smart Persons" 



Knickerbocker Theatre Annex, - New York 



good voices. Chris Bruno ami Mabelle Russell 
start In badly, but their finish iu "one," a song 
descriptive of several childhood games, guve tbeui 
four recalls Sunday afternoon. The Vernon Troupe 
open the show with some good xylophone work. 
Wynne Winslow returns iu better voice than ever, 
and finds herself a big favorite. John Cope has 
written a good sketch In "Left at the Tost," and 
Mary Dupont and WIMard Hutchinson make the 
most of it to the delight of all three floors. Ferry 
Convey closes the show with some One musical 
specialties. The kinodronie has a place of honor 

in the middle of the bill. NOTES.— The local 

engagement of the Orpheuui Koad Show will prob- 
ably result in the debut as an open air soloist of 
It. A. Holfe, the cornet 1st, who appeared here at 
the heed of the "Ye CoIonhU Septet" act. Emil 
oberhoffer. director of the Oberhoffer Band, 
which has five weeks at the Lake Harriet Pa 
vllloo this summer, heard him, arranged a meet- 
ing, and all but signed contracts. If Mr. Rolfe 
can get away from New York for the time de- 
sired Mr. oberhoffer will have him. 

OH API N. 



"Pals" made a big bit; Rossow Midgets proved 
excellent, especially the boxing bout; Frank Gard- 
ner and Lottie Vincent In "Winning a (Jueeu" 
better than last time here; M'lle Troja did gomo 
Impersonations, fair; Wood and Barry, dancers; 
Dixon and Holmes, comedians; Godfrey and Hen- 
derson in "A Darling of the Gods," tiresome 
sketch. Week March 19, Grace Cameron, Jackson 
Family :.nd Kittle Trauey. W. J. F. 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 
HATHAWAY S (T. B. Buylles, mgr.).— "rarls," 
comedy playlet, presented by Clayton White and 
Marie Stuart, is the best act of the season, and 
made an instant hit. Another excellent number is 
that of the Three Lelghtous, introducing comedy, 
singing and dancing, all deftly done. Blanche 
Sloans trapeze act is good. Reno aad Richards 
do too mucli rough house and too little acrobatics. 
The Fryors are entertaining in an instrumental, 
singing and dancing act. Theo. Julian, xylophone 
and bells, fair, though not novel. Josle Davis 
sings acceptably. New vitagraph pictures. Good 
bouses. KNOT. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

OHPHEUM (Martin Beck. gen. uigr.). — Bert 
Coote and company presented "A Lamb in Wall 
Street." Amoros Sisters, novelty artists, excel- 
lent. Castellat and Hall belong on the "Dime 
Circuit." Carson and Wlllard. German comedians, 
fair. Tony Wilson and Hcloise offer a clever 
hounding' bed act. Willy Zimmerman Is always 
welcome. Rossi's Musical Horse Is a wonder. 
Business Is good. Bill for March 10 contains Kd 
ward Stevens, Argenantl Trio, Marvellous How- 
ards. Bruno an«l Russell. Foster and Foster, Raw- 
son and June and Mr. and M'rs. Stuart Harrow. 

GREEN WALL (Henry Greenwall. mgr.).— Scrib- 
ner's Gay Musqueradcrs, who opened for week 11. 
have a very poor show. They offer "The Adviser" 
and "Way Up Yeast." The girls are pretty, the 
costumes handsome, but the company as a whole 
lack talent. The olio Includes Harrison Sisters, 
singers and dancers, below par; Berry and Berry. 
musical team, fair; Gourley, Sully and Gourley, 
acrobats, fair; James and Lucia Cooper, tangle 
talk, poor. Business Is good. Sarali Bernhardt, 
In repertoire, for week 18. Trocadero Bnrlesquers 

for week 25. NOTE.— Henry Greenwall will 

build a new theatre one square from the Green- 
wall. It will be called the Baldwin, and will 
house the Baldwin-Melville Stock Company. 

O. M. SAMUEL. 



NEWARK, N. J. 

PROCTOR'S.— Week of 12th was a record- 
breaker, owing to the engagement of Miss Grace 
von Studdlford. the well known comic opera star. 
The Kllnore Sisters are doing a very clever con- 
versation act, William O'Brien, assisted by Miss 
Aggie Buckley, made good. The Sydney Blow 
company blew In from England, and Just as soon 
as they inject a little American by-play Into their 
sketch they will do. The bill Includes the Dollar 
Troupe, acrobats; the Italian Opera Trio; Fer- 
mi es. the musical clown, with his trained dog; 
the Elgonas, comic athletes, and Master Willie 
Dorn of this city in boll solos. Next week: Win. 
•Court leigh and company, Cclina Bohe. Joe Morris. 
I'iechlani Troupe, etc. WALDMAN'S.— Week 12 
business swell. Fred Irwin's Majesties hold the 
boards. The opening sketch, "Down the Line," in- 
troduced swell girls and comic comedians In a 
medley of songs interspersed with funny Jokes and 
intricate dancing, 'iliose In the olio are Harvey 
and Walker, singers; the Roneys. musical artists; 
la iron and Fay, comedians; Qulnlan Brothers and 
Buckley, Jugglers, and the Majestic Trio, singers 
and dancers. The show dosed with the skit "For 
Girls Only." which caught the fancy of the pa- 
Irons of this bouse. Next week: New York stars. 



NORFOLK, VA. 
ACME (Manzle ft Wllkerson, mgrs.). — Opened 
week 12 with following bill to good house: Brewer 
and Anderson's burlesque "The College Girls," 
clever; Abide Schotield In coon songs, took well; 
Helen Lovett, contortionist, lair; Oscar Brewer, 
Irish comedian, good; White and Johnson, song il- 
lustrators, the hit of the bill; Clifton ami Lam- 
»>ert in songs and dances. The bill winds up with 
new pictures and a one act musical burlesque, 
"Handy Andy." BIJOU (Chas. West, mgr.).— 
Harry Shaffer's twelve Tuxedo Misses took well; 
Dudrow and Carroll, grotesque acrobats, clever; 
the Two Bnrrrs in their electrical dancing nov- 
elty, were a hit; business good. AUDITORIUM 
(Jas. Barton, mgr.).— Charlie Rents in his one- 
act comedy. "The Jlmtown Expo." headed the bill 
St this resort; Johnson and Grant, knockalaiut act, 
took well; Sullivan and Patterson In living models, 
fair; moving pictures. MANHATTAN (Crlnlan 
Bros., mgrs.). — The Manhattan Stock Company, 
headed by the Madderns. In a three-act burletta. 
"Jack, the Skipper." opened to big business. 
NOTE.— The Frank Amusement Company of Ports- 
mouth, Va.. are remodellug the Mechanics' Hall, 
on Main street, to In* used for n burlesque house. 

W. P. HOPE. 



PUEBLO, COLO. 
EARL (G. M. Morris, mgr.).— Bill for 12 opened 
*o packed bouse. Theo and Camllle La Jess top 
the bill In a clever contortion and ring act. Marie 
CTirard, In monologue, went big. Saleh and Finer 
■son, gun spinners, food, J. o. Wise, double-hand 
•id cartoonist, hits of the bill. The Langdons, In 
a sketch, fair. Illustrated song and moving pic- 
tures complete bill'. Business big week of S. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE.— Bohemians. 11, to 
packed houses. Several acts of the olio were laid 
•off. weakening a weak show. H. EXBEE. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

BOLUS (J. H. Docking, res. mgr.).- Week 
March iS^Hal Davis and Inez MncCauloy in 



POTTSTOWN, PA. 
CdtAND OPERA HOUSE (Win. Porter, Jr.. 
•mgr. t.- March 8-10. Buckeye Trio in "A Tramp's 
Dream." made a bit. Whittle, vent rlluquhd, the 
man that fooled the President, keeps the house in 
an uproar. Massey and Kramer are gi>od enter- 
tainers. Harry Brown. Indian college boy. sing- 
ing cartoonist, is clever. Harvey and Devcra. 
dancing comedians, good. Show closed with pic- 
tures. Business big. March 12. 18. 14. Millar 
Brothers' Diorama made a hit. Earl and Battlett, 
Irish comedy sketch, keep the house in on up- 
roar. Allen and DaltOO, comedy musicians, fair; 
Dracula, contortionist, is the best seen here. D's 
snd D's, colored comedy team, keep the audience 
applauding, narry Green sings Illustrated songs. 
Klnetograpll ends the show. Business good. March 
IB, lfi. 17. Cogan ami Bancroft. Mr. nnd Mrs 
Mick Hughes, Eleanor Blanchard, English and 



Gaud.), Illustrated auuga and Kluetograph. AUDI 

iwiotji \iJtunu & oiibeii, m$ib.). — Meek ut 12. 

Joe Aiuny, scotuma ju*givr. Cornelia uuu fcuiis, 
oiufccis a».ii wuici'iaiueie, luuue a hit. * taint 
biuuhs, luiiaiiau-u songs, goou. Johnson, buvcu- 
puil aud Loieiiu, uauuais, gel numerous laugiia. 
Curtis uud Auulus, ut-nuau comcuiaua, were tue 
hit of the bin. Pictures ciose. Bubiuccts good. 

J. 11. WEll4i„NKUUN. 



PAWTUCKET, R. I. 

NEW 1'AWTlLKi.i. — Week of 12th MuUoui, 
the. haiidcuil king and trunk mystery, is the bead- 
line act; Aiuny and Alueu lu a sketch caugui ou 
well. Uilve u anion, coon biiouter, good. Lew in 
aud Dciuiore, character change and muglug act, 
hit. Theo. W. Reuuie, songs, ounces uud luuuy 
buyiiigs, good. Mutt Bennies »ougs were Uuely 
rendered. The farce "Fust and Slow" creates big 
laughs. Pictures close the suow. Big houses tue 
rule this week. NOi'bS. — t-riuuy evening tins 
week a farewell testimonial will be given 10 Mutt 
Biuuie by the I'a w tucket Aerie of Ladies, of wnich 
he is a member. John J. kcliy, a uiouoiogue uiiiat 
of this city, has Just recovered from an opciuliou. 

NICK. 



POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

FAMILY (E. B. Sweet, uigr.).— The press of 
this city bus attacked the sufeiy of the theulie re- 
garding means of escape iu case of nre or panic. 
'J lie building Is being thoroughly inspected by the 
Mayor, Chief of the Fire Depurlmeut uud a com- 
petent architect, and the owner agrees to comply 
with their instructions. Notwithstanding tue 
above, business bus been good this week. 1 ne top- 
liner, Blanche Cbeseboroiigu Scott, vocalist, cuu- 
celed ou account of iline.ss. Hiwu, the Man Iioui 
Murs, heads the bill with a good act, Syivuu uud 
O'Neal, iu their ucroballc act, greut hit. Juck 
and Bertha Rich, comedy singing uud dancing, uiu 
clever urtlsts. Tommy Dunn, tue Messenger Boy, 
shows versatility, illustrated songs. Moiiou pic- 
tures good. W. C. MATT1.RN. 



RACINE, WIS. 

BIJOU (JoneS and O'Brien Circuit, Win, C. 
Tiede, local mgr.). — Bill week 12 as louows: Tops 
and Topsey, comedy ucrobat uud trick dog, clever; 
Harris and Walker, colored singing ami uuuciug 
comedians, made good; Little Aiilured, souurelle, 
does a nice act and dresses it well; Mcoee aud 
Collins, comedy sketch, laughable; Margaret Shuu- 
non, vocalist, good; Williums and ooruou, co- 
medians, lair; Davis and Du vis, iu a comedy 
; ketch, pleased every one, Capacity houses. 

WM. J. Mel LR ATI I. 



READING, PA. 

ORPUEI M (Frank D. Hill, mgr.;. — Ned Nye 
and his Rollicking Girls bead the bill, aud is u 
hit. Carlln uud Otto, German comedluus, laugh- 
ing hit. The Four Keutoiis, Knockabout comedians, 
well liked. Zingarl Trio, in u bit of grand opera, 
pleasing. Dorothy Kenton, with her banjo, was 
well received. Larklns uud Putterson, 11 colored 
team, makes good. Shedmuu's dogs open the show. 

The Kluetograph closes. Good business. BIJOU 

(Updegraff & Biownel), mgrs.) .--Week March 12, 
Golden Crook Bnrlesquers opened to fair business. 
The show Is a good one. Dally matinees are being 
given at tills house. MACK. 



Broth- 

Knlck- 
' Riley's 



ST. LOUIS. 

The weather played muny pranks during the 
opening days of this week, but did not seriously 
affect business at the vuudevllle and burlesque 
houses. Sunday It rained and snowed alternately, 
and on Monday the thermometer registered zero, 
yet packed houses marked the matinee ami night 
performances of both days. 

COLUMBIA (Frank Tate, mgr.).— It is an ut- 
ter impossibility to pick the topliner of this 
wick's program presented by the Orpheuui show. 
Suffice to say that all of the acts were excel- 
lent. Then' was not a bad presentation. Compris- 
ing the bill were the Colonial Septette, Marlon's 
Dogs, Jules and Flla Garrison, Winona Winter, 
Sisters and Brothers Ford, Edgar Bixley, Camp- 
bell and Johnson. Lizzie McKccver, Gloss 
ers. Si Stebbilis, Howard and Rutherford, 

GAYETY (O. T. Crawford, mgr. ). -The 
erbocker BurlesquerS pleased immensely. 
Speech," the opening burletta. was participated 
iu by Pete Curley, who essayed the leading role, 
but forgot his dialect; May Agnes Fleming, who 
proved a very clever comedienne, and Alleene 
Vincent, who was the hit of ix>t ii burlettas 00 
account of her very cleVer SOUbrette work. Miss 
Vincent made a dozen changes of costume, all of 
which, it tan safely be stated, are the most 
elaborate and expensive used by any soubrctte In 
the burlesque business. Miss Vincent is gifted 
with .1 beautiful stage presence. Sam Green and 
William Pat ton carried their parts well. Oscar 
Lewis, iu his Swede dialectatlons, acquitted him 
self creditably. •'Christy." the tramp Juggler, 
was the feature Of the vaudeville olio. The Les 
I.aioscs. Lewis ami Green and the Slu'ws were 
good. 

STANDARD il>-o Reicbeubecb, mgr.).— The 
original Billy Watson and his "big" Oriental 
Bnrlesquers. repeated past successes here this 
week. Watson is the Whole show In himself. The 
line of Dutch comedy that lie dealt out took the 
bouse by storm at each performance. Swan and 
Barn bard, acrobatic comedians; Frnanl Stewart. 
characteristic dances; Ynmoinoto Brothers, wire and 
perch artists, scored bits. Harry Montague and 



Caroline Duncan 
and closing acts 
NOTES; -Radh 
formerly of the 
decided to make 



were very active in the openin; 



Sherman and Lorraine Barnard, 
'Forbidden Land" company, bave 
a trial at vaudeville. They will 
make an initial appearance In a few weeks. Tlf 
fan? D -Mtgan. business manager of the Cracker 
larks, has given a drcttsllke appearance to the 
town In billing his show for next week. 

JOE PAZ1 S 



SAN ANTONIO. TEX. 

MAJESTIC <F. H. FItshugh, mm 1 Week 
March 11. Clever Conkey, Dutch Juggler, fair; 
Rawls and Van Kaufman, comedy sketch, poor 



act; HowIbou, bird warbler and mimic, clever; 
Cull and Johnson, reuiicd dancing, met with ap- 
proval; Krekko and Frugal], Italian opera sing- 
ers, wlu fuvor; Miss Zoa Matthews, aecoud appear- 
ance this season, had them, going wltb her local 
aud coou songs; Otura Japanese troupe of chil- 
dren, acrobats and contortionists, tbe bit of the 
bill. Majestograph ami Illustrated pictures good. 
NOTES.— Billy Simuis, the old popular vaudeville 
manager, known by many star performers, has 
retired from business, and will look to the build- 
ing up of San Antonio. The Hot Sulphur Wells 
Park is proviug to be quite an attraction to all 
visitors under Its new management. Will have 
more park news in my next. OMALA. 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
OKPHECM (Jules F. Bestes. mgr.).— Week 5. 

Beatrice McKensie, Happy Jack Gardner, Madame 

Emmy, Bietrickx Bros., Rand and Byron and 
Kinodronie. Big business all week to pleased audi- 
ences. DON TON (J. H. Young, mgr.). — Week 5, 
Piemen and Miller, the Kingsbury s. Madame Mon- 
tague. Happy Jack Haggerty, Elsie Hilton and 
Kinetoscope. Good show aud business. S. R. O. 
Saturday matinee. LYRIC (Win. Guluey, mgr.). 
—Week 3. Rlfe's Yankee Doodle Glrla aud vaude- 
ville, consisting of Fox and Dubull. Guhl and 
Yale. Etta Victoria, Murphy and Magee, Baker 
Troupe (very good) and Schoenwerk. A fine bill 
to large audiences. S. R. 0. at times. 

J. E. JOHNSON. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ORPHKUM (John Morrlsey, res. mgr.).— Week 
March 5, Four piccolo Midgets, Agnes Muhr, Mile. 
Chester and her statue dog; Lillian Burkburdt and 
company, She.man De Forrest and company. Me- 
dio and Cahlll, Al Carlctun, Rooney Sisters aud 

the biograph. Business simply immense. 

LYCEUM (Sullivan «: Consldlne. mgrs.).— Bell 
Trio, Marco, Ilawes Sisters, Foster and Henderson. 
Vera Barnaul! and company, Homer Long aud 

moving pictures. EMl'lRE (Win. Weston. 

mgr.).— Brazil and Frank. Reld and Miller, Hayes 
and Wenchcll, Gladys Carlisle, Topsy Turvy Trio 
«0d moving pictures, BALDWIN (Blum & Tif- 
fany, mgrs.).— Lew KneUger, Three Masqoerta 
Sisters, George Alexander, Fred Irwin, Nip and 

Tuck and moving pictures. NOVELTY (Sam 

l.overich. mgr,).— -Patrholo Trio. Clifford and 
Eddy, Morris Duo, Aurora Sisters, Kitty Burk 

and moving pictures. MISSION (J. Freed, 

mgr.). — Manolita Stetson, Nat Wentworth, the 
Great Ouzos, the Klipper Four, Miss Mills, De 

Wall and Irwin uud moving pictures. NOTES. — 

•he Rell'-Thcatre Is advertised to open May IS, 
but they iiave postponed the Opening so often that 
I hardly think It will open on that date. There 
is some talk of another It) cent house for North 
Beach, to be erected on Montgomery u venue, neur 

Union street. 



SEATTLE, WA8H. 
SEATTLE (John Cort. mgr.).— Week 4. Ave 

line Girls opened Sunday matinee to big business. 
Tills Is a thoroughly good show. They bud oppo- 
sition across the street in "Little Johnny Jones," 
but nevertheless got their share of the" business. 
This Is the second attraction of Campbell & Drew 
this season, and If all the burlesque shows on 
the Western Wheel were as good as these man- 
agers have they would bave no kick on their West- 
ern trip. The olio Includes Jules Bennett, tbe 
Three Gregorys, Murphy and Reynolds, Olga Or- 
lofT and company ami the Glrllgraph. Next week: 
Rellly and Woods' Big Show. STAR (M. G. Win- 
stock, mgr.).- Starting out this week with a 
new policy, giving longer shows and better acts, 
this bouse has raised the prices from 10 and 20 
cents to 15, l!."i and .'lo, am] is giving much bet- 
ter acts. This week they have the Four Spring- 
holds and company, Harlland Trio, Muller and 
Chumm. Cheuvrall. Beach and Bart, Hall and Lor- 
raine. Peter Diiusworth and the Statscope. 
ORPHEUM (E. J. Donnellan, mgr.). King and 
Staug, comedy sketch; Inez Scott, aerial serpen* 
line dancer; Rooney ami Forrester, Irish comedy 
sketch; W. II. Stetson, baritone; Walker and Bur- 
rell, Napoleon Four, iu -i playlet, "The Waif's 
Appeal;" Orpfaenmscope, PA NT AG B8 (Alex, pan- 
tages, mgr,). — Frank Clayton, comedian; Margaret 
Lewis, singing and dancing soubrette; Eunice 
Drake and company, Arthur Elwell, the great 
Caesar and company, Annie Rcofleld, Harmony 
Comedy Pour, I'antagescope. CENTRAL (Shannon, 
mgr. 1. Confine and Lawrence, Morgan and Ches- 
ter, the marvelous Malcotnbe, Sadie lllte. Central- 
scope. GEE GEE BEE. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
BOLUS (J. C. diddle, res. mgr.). A good Mil 
this week, headed by the Military Octet, Dean 
Edsall and Arthur Forbes present "Dad's Boy." 
A unique shadowgraph 1st Is Chasslno. A miniature 
minstrel overture was given by Daley's Dixie 
Serenadeis. Car on and Farnuin. In an acrobatic 
act, got a good many laugh*. CadcailX, a bound- 
ing wire artist; Bert Von Kline ami Grace Gibson, 
a singing and dancing thin, and the electrograph 
complete tin- bill. NELSON (Z. T. Damon. 

ingr.). The High Rollers Extravaganza Company 
ripened the week with two rousing burlettas. Vau- 
levllle weak. Coming, the Washington Society 
Belles. frank McDonald. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSi: <C. H. Mummer 
mgr.). The bill i| is week Includes the Twelve 
NaVSjo tJirls. well received; Kates Brothers failed 
»o please |»hll ami Nettle Deters, fair; Fetching 
Brothers are good musicians, bill Should cut out 
the comedy stuff; Hobby North received with great 
applause; Madame Slapoffskl, vr.v well liked; \a- 
rov and Clayton made n fair Impression. Next 
week, the Spook Minstrel- tlriKtoPs Educated 
Ponies, Howard and Bland, Lew Hawkins Three 
Madcap-, Johnson and Wells and Max Smith Duo 

SAM FREEMAN. 



SAGINAW. MICH. 

.IKIi I'll S r.Ham s Marks, mgr.).— narry North 

and his comedians, assisted by Miss Virginia 

'Joodwin. continue to draw Crowded houses 

nightly. 'Yankee Doodle Dandy" was the 



i6 



VARIETY 







FAIRYLAND 

PATERSON, N. J. 

Second Season Opens 

S ATURDAY, M AY 26th 

A ttendance 1904, - 500,000 



Q We own four buildings, 50 ft. fronts, for which 
we want something new. 

I| What have you to offer on percentage? 

C| Also have not yet leased privilege for Glass 
Blower, Burnt Leather Goods, Feather Workers, Wire 
Workers, Cane Rack, Doll Rack and other legitimate 
games. 

fl Great opportunity for swimming pool. 



Melville 





1 402 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 

PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 

ASK THE STARS, SOME FOR 
WHOM I'VE WORKED. 

*~~'^ Thos. 
Seabrooke, 
Jeanette Lowrie, 
Mabelle Oilman, Irene Bent- 
ley, Annie Irish, Edna Goodrich, Eltinge, 
Nella Bergen, Elfie Fay, Mra. Yeamans, Estelle 
Wentworth, Amy Ricard, Cherry Simpson, Eddie Leonard, etc 

31 West 31st Street, New York 




HURTIO. * SEAriOS'PRESEtfT 

ERNEST H0GAN 



de unbleached American) 

- "RUFUS RASTUS 

Seaaon 1 906—07 



99 



ilrst play presented this week. Some good special- 
ties-were introduced by Grace Whitcher, the two 
Fergusons and Baby Vera. Schepp's dog and pony 
show Is a great drawing card. NOTE. — Hereafter 
Mr. J. J. Murdock of Chicago will do the book- 
ing for tills bou.se. NENO. 

SCHENECTADY, N. Y. 
MOHAWK (Jos. Weber, res. mgr.).-— Fair busi- 
ness. Week of 12: Valdare Troupe, bicyclists, well 
received; Kelly and Kent, comedy singers and 
dancers, fair; Gardner and Stoddard in a sketch, 



BOB WATT 



WHITES SONGS, MONO- 
LOGUES, SKETCHES, 
COMEDIES AND DRAMAS. 
EST. 1879. BEST ORIGINAL WORK FUR 
PROFESSIONALS. 8U0A WALNUT ST., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



"Vaudeville Frivolities," pleasing; C. Torbay's sil- 
houettes, went well; C. W. Llttlefield made a fair 
impression; Joe Relchen's acrobatic dogs were well 
received; Trchenllk and Tulka Farn were good. 
Closed with motion pictures. Coming week of 19: 
Rossow Midgets, Viola Gillette and others. 

MARTEL. 



TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (J. Shea, mgr.).— Another splendid bill 
ilrew the usual crowded houses. Paul Conchas 
gave a marvelous exhibition of heavy juggling. 
Kltinge, a female impersonator, is in the front 
rank; Harrows, Lancaster and company made good 
with their sketch, "Tactics of the Blue and Gray." 
Wormwood's dogs and monkeys are well trained. 



"COMING THROUGH THE RYE, JENNIE MINE" 



X 

> 
< 

a 

at 

3 



Francis, Day & Hunter 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

WE ARE NOW PERMANENTLY LOCATED IN OUR NEW QUARTERS AT 

15 WEST 30th STREET 



(BETWEEN BROADWAY AND 5TH AVE.), N. Y. 

LARGE AND COMMODIOUS PROFESSIONAL ROOMS 
COMPETENT PIANIST ALWAYS IN ATTENDANCE 
ALWAYS A GOOD SONG TO SUIT YOU 

If you can't call, write us, and you will receive immediate attention. 

FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

SAM GROSS, Mgr. Prof. Dept. 1 S WEST BOTH STREET, NEW YORK 

1 5 W. 30th Street new mrTcity 



01 

■ 

CO 

o 

■t 

0) 



2 2 

f 

< 



I "COMING THROUGH THE BYE, JENNIE MINE" 



LONDON -MUSIC HALL" 

67>e Great English Vaudeville Taper (Weekly) 

401 STRAND, W. C. 

American Representative— Miss Ida M. Carle, Room 708, St. James Building, where a 
file of papers can be seen and advertisements will be received 




GREATER N. V. CIRCUIT 




M 8th AVE. 
I 



PARISIAN 



N 

E BOWERY 

R 

S 



w 

E 
E 
K 



MAY 
HOWARD 



C 

H 



The Original Home off 
Amatour Nights 



19» 



Very chic Is Theresa Dorgeval, the French vocal- 
ist. I-ew Hopkins sings and tells stories in his 
own way. Others were Rice and Elmer, Lulgl Del 
Oro and the Klnetograph. STAR (J. W. Stair, 
mgr.).— The Brigadiers, with Edmund Hayes, Is a 
good one. "The Wise Guy" gives Hayes plenty of 



V 



HAMMERSTEINS 

ICTORIA 



THEATRE 

or 

VARIETIES 

Next Week ^SSStSSm Mar. 19 

Prices. 23c. 60c, 75c & $1 00. Mat. Every Day, 25c & He 
Second and Last Week of 

Nr. HENRI DeVRIES 

Europe's Greatest Character Actor, 
Presenting His Wonderful Protean Play, en- 
titled "A Cuse of Arson." 

First Time This Season, 
ORO. FILLER GOLDEN, Monologlst. 

WARD AND CPRRAN, 

in "The Terrlhle Judge." 

Return of 
THE MARVELOUS 4 BARD BROS., 

Sensational Gymnasts. 

RAPPO SISTERS, 
Hungarian Dancers. 

THE TWO PUCKS, Singers and Dancers. 

First Time Here, 
MR. FRANK LYNN, Coster Comedian. 

MARGUERITE AND HANLEY, 

European Hand Balancers. 

ROTOW, Equilibrist. 
NEW YITAGRAPH VIEWS. 

PASTOR'S 

14th St., near Third Ave. Continuous Performance. 
Week of March 19th. 

1866-4 1st Anniversary W*«fc -1906 

MISS NORTON AND PAUL NICHOLSON. 

Rice & Elmer. Potter & Hartwell. 

Mons. Elwood & Co. Willie Gardner. 

John Zimmer. St. John & I^e Fevre. 

Harris & Reauregarde. Carrol & Baker. 

Williams &. Pullman. The Conroys. 

Adams & White. The Vitagraph. 

And ns Added Attraction: 

LEONA THURBER AND "DUTCH PICKS." 



Chances. The Kuhns are clever musicians and 
singers. Andy Mct'loiid, the Irish minstrel, deliv- 
ered the goods. Ilic Prentice Trio are skillful 
acrobats. Others were Blanche Buford, Lester 
and Moure and Margaret Hayes. HARTLEY. 



TROY, N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (W. II. Graham, res. mgr.).— 
Week March 12, Prelle's Dog Circus Is a good 
one and pleased mightily. Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Fltzslmruons appear in their love making sketch, 
In which Boh taps the bag to much applause. 
Louis Simon and Grace Gardner scored heavily In 
their sketch, "The New Coachman." A. O. 



VARIETY 



17 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



The Stars' Hea dquarters for Vaudeville 

W. L. LYKEN3' VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

31 WEST 31et STREET, MEW YORK 



Tel. 3487 Brymt. C.ble, "Control," Now York. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
HOLLAND BUILOINO. 

BENTHAM 

ST. JAMES BLDG., 26th ST. and BROADWAY 

Phone 2548 Madison Sq. NEW YORK 

IDA CARLE 

St. Jmmmm Building 

SOLE BOOKING AGENT FOR 

Dollle Bell's Dancing Troupes 

Smartest Dancing Girls In England. BIX EM' 
PIHE GIRLB on tour in America, EIGHT PHI- 
MOSES on tour In AUSTRALIA. POPPIES (8) 
and other Troupes open after April 



BORNHAUPT 1!SSV" AT,0 "* L 

bt. James Bldg. Tel. 4564 Mad. Sq., New York. 



CHAS. ESCHERT 

with Ai Sutherland, St. James Building. 
Booking only good acts. 



New York Representative 

Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 

AL. MAYER 

VAUDEVILLE AQENT 

Room 803, St. James Building 
H' way and 26th Street, New York 

Tel., 3847 Madison, 



H. B. MARINELLI 



NEW YORK 

Cable. 
"Helferslch" 



PARIS 

Cable. 
"Uptodate Paris' 



LONDON 

Cable. 
"Bravisslmo--- London'' 



St. Jamea Bldg., 1133 Broadway. 
Telephone, 2462 Madison. 



Duncan, ventriloquist, was amusing; Allie Gilbert 
and her Summer Girls, in a good singing ami 
dancing specialty, taught on; Augusta Glose, in a 
musical monologue, was a good eatertainer; Ethel 
MacDonough, the girl behind the drum, is a 
pleasing number; Carroll Johnson, blackface 
comedian, was pleasing. Show closes with pic- 
tures. ROYAL (W H. Buck, mgr.).— Week 

March 12, The Black Crook, Jr., company opened 
to fair business here In a melange of music, danc- 
ing, singing and comic situations. Coming, week 
March 19, Irwin's Big Show. J. J. M. 



TRENTON, N. J. 

TRENT (Ed Reuton, mgr.).— Week March 12, 
Geigles and Walter in their musical novelty, "In 
the Streets of Italy," very good; Major James D. 
Doyle pleased; Harry Corson Clarke and company. 
in "Strategy," made good; Mason, Kelly and com- 
pany provoked laughter with their farce, "The 
Onion Ttust;" Lew Kelly, headliner, got the glad 
hand; Edward Clark and his alx winning widows, 
good; show concludes with Blograph. Bill for 
next week includes Leslie and Dailey in "Going 
Abroad;" "In the Swim," spectacular novelty of 
twelve artists; Hugh Stanton and company, Darras 
Bros., Klein and Clifton, Almont and Dumont, 
Zlngarl Trio and Biograph. II B. HEATH. 



UTICA, N. Y. 

ORPHEUM (E. L. Koneke, res. mgr.).— BUI for 
week March 12 headed by Viola Gillette In an 
exceptionally strong singing number called "Acci- 
dents Will Happen." While the akit is not much 
in Itself, it serves well to bring about several 
songs, and these were pleasing. George J. Mac- 
Farland's work was second only to that of the 
star. They were obliged to respond to several en- 



FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS ftiS 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Tel., 4967 Madison 
B. A. 



Cable, Myeraba 
E. S. 



MYERS-KELLER 

GENERAL VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 

31 West 31st Street, New York 

Pitrot&Girard 

International Vaudeville Agents. 
1265 Broadway, New York 



Tel., 4615 Madison. 



Boohing Act! Every Day. 

FELIX REICH 
JAMES E. PLUNKETT 

THE NEW FIRM. 



REICH <fc FLVNKX1T. St. James Building 
Phone 2632 Mtv*. Sq. 

Alex. Steiner 

VAUDEVILLE AQENT 

Booking Foreign and Native Acta. 

ST. JAME8 BUILDING. NEW YORK. 



Anything There's a Dollar In 

JAGK LEVY 

140 West 42d St. New York 

YOU CAN BE BOOKED 

ALBERT SUTHERLAND 

VAUDEVILLE BOOKINGS 

Phone S2M5 Madison St. James Building 



cores. Unusually strong also is the act of Ed F. 
Reynard, the ventriloquist, for be has the most 
marvelous lot of mechunical figures ever seen 
here, and his act was a big hit. Steeley, Doty 
and Coe came in for their share of the applause 
with their strong musical act. Clever imitations 
of famous stars, most of whom are well known 
here, were given by Miss Violet Dale, and her 
work was faithfully done. Nat Leroy and Minnie 
Woodford have a lively conversational act with 
good songs and Jokes that are new. Eddie Leon- 
ard appeared and claimed he was unable to work 
on account of a throat trouble. His assistants, 
the Sharp Brothers, went on in their dancing 
turn, and are presenting a satisfactory number. 
Spauldlug opens the show with a clever exhibition 
(•f hand Jumping and equlllbristlc work. Klneto- 
graph pictures conclude the show. Coming next 
week, Watson's Farm Yard, Eddie Herron and bis 
Show Girls, Carlin and Otto, Dorothy Kenton, La 
Vine Cimarron Trio, I^a Belle, Thomas and Payne 

and the Klnetograph. NOTE. — The American 

Theatre (11. S. Hall, lessee and mgr.) has closed 
until after I,ent on account of poor attendance. 

SETAB. 



WICHITA, KAN. 

BIJOU (Carl E. Olson, mgr.). — Sullivan and 
Faunce, dancing marvels, were well received, as 
were Raynette St. Germain, introducing her unique 
Japanese box mystery. Little Ethel Mabell sang 
the Illustrated song. Wharton and LeRoy in 
comedy act entitled "I Wish You'd Listen." were 
good. Bljougrnph closed the show. Business 
good. NOTE. — Phroso Kemp closes here at d goes 
to Shawnee. Okla.. to take a partnership and 
open and manage a new vaudeville theatre. 
LYBIG (Cox & Wise, mgrs.).— Madge Daytell. 
coon shouter. opened the show, fair. Billy Durant 
presented a Chinese comedy act and pleased. Car- 




Acts wishing to be booked for 
London, please inform us im- 
mediately where same may be 
seen week March 26, stating 
exact time, etc. 

m> m- m- 





MARINELLI 



ST. JAMES BUILDING 

Broadway, New York City 



TELEPHONE: 2462 MADISON 



LON 



• It 




PARIS 



P. S.— Kindly send photos, etc. 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS Or ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OP 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 

AT FOLLOWINO RATES: 
1-2 Inoh single column, • ••••-.... $2.00 monthly. Net 

I Inoh " 4 00 " M 

1 -2 Inoh double column, 4.00 " " 

1 Inoh M 7.60 M " 



rolton iiinl Hodges, singers and dancers, good. 
Illustrated song and the Lyricscope. Business fair. 

A. C. RACE. 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 

DOCKSTADER'S G A RRICK.— Opened to very 
good business week 12. The Four Shannons, Juve- 
nile quartet and dancers were well received. 
Harry B. Letter and his eight mascots get on very 
nicely. Healy and Median, comedians and dancers, 
went well. Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Barry got con- 
tinuous applause. Three Brothers Liminys, Euro- 
pean comedy acrobats, were well received. Mitchell 
and Matron, minstrels, good. The Four Seasons 
earned several recalls. The Klnetograph closed 

the bill. NOTE. Hlnes and Remington were 

compelled to cancel this week on account of the 
Illness of Miss Remington. PITRO. 



WATERBURY, CONN. 

JACQUES (W. J. Fitr.patrlck. mgr.) .— The hill 
this week Is hardly up to the standard. Felix. 
Marry ami company, the hendllners. In the sketch. 
"The Roy Next Door." failed to please. The real 
hit of the bill was the Three Roses In a dainty 
musical act. "The Kenedlctlon" (see New Acts) 
scored heavily. The other real hit of the bill was 
the Golden <late Quintet, a party of five colored 
singers and dancers. The Three Cartmells have a 
cle\er act. The Josselyn Trio scored as the aero 
batlc feature of the bill, and the show was opened 
by Haymnn and Franklin, who, with the help of 
the pianist, pleased. The picture machine closed 
the offering, with attendance up to the usual aver 
age. ARTHUR 11 McKECHNIE. 



Y0NKER8, N. Y. 

DORIC (Henry Myers, mgr.). — Show opened to 
a good house on Monday with a good bill. West 
and Van Bicleu In their musical act "A College 
Gymnasium' 1 made a decided hit. Bertlna and 
Hrockway, a dancer and a contortionist, two girls, 
went strong. Russell and Dunbar, in a Southern 
sketch, pleased. Llbby and Trayer, return engage- 
ment, made good. Flske and McDonough, In their 
sketch "Good News." went well. Katie Rooney 
and company went very strong. Miss Rooney's 
impersonation of her late father was excellent. 
Fred Ray and company, in travesty on Shake- 
speare, was one big scream. The Dorlscope showed 
some grxMl pictures. Business good. F.I .7.1 K. 



Y0UN08T0WN, 0. 
GAYETY (Jos. W. Wcss. mgr.). -The Euro- 
pean Sensation Burlesquera, presenting "Schultz's 
Hotel" and a souvenir, are making a hit to hlg 
business. Special feat tire, Yapasuma troupe of 
royal Japs. Next week: Al Reeves' Beauty Show. 
NOTES.— Tbla Is the fourth week of the new Osy- 
ety Theatre with excellent business. Harry Davis 
of Pittsburg 1m looking over Sites here to build a 
new vaudeville hoine. ('HAS. R. BROWN. 



YORK. PA. 
PARLOR (Win. IMe. prop, and mgr.).— The 
bill of week March 12 made a big hit. I^onso. 
the Dutch juggling butcher. good; F.d K. Cassady. 
Illustrated songs, good; the Silver Comedy Four, 
tine; Hoyt ami Waller, big bit; the Musical Bart- 
let ts, -front; Klnetograph closes the show. 

TRIXIB. 



\ 



i8 



VARIETY. 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



"THE HIT OF THE SEASON" 



CHARLES 





&C0 



(OF EVANS & HOEY PARLOR MATCH FAME) in a One-Act Farce by George Arliss Called 

"IT'S UP TO YOU, WILLIAM" 

Packed houses and enthusiastic audiences at 
the Alhambra endorse the critic's opinion, viz: 

"It was more than a success. It wasa triumph of good acting, good management and good sense."— M ^"-« Ttie g » P b 

WEEK MARCH 19, ■ COLONIAL THEATRE 



FRANCESCA REDDING 

in "Her Friend From Texas" 

•Tlif act that made WILL CRESS Y famous." Three real actors— but only ONE laugh. Booking now. 

Next*- WYOMING — Season 

Management SHERWOOD & SILRK, Chicago 

JOE EDMONDS 

" Th * m?J'?"" Vaudeville 

EDDIE SIMMONS 

21 Genan * B«il » aJS:'.'. -Vr; 



JOS. 



J. w. 



Madden -Jess 

Invite Offers for Next Season 
Address care of Utopians. En Route 



will shortly 
appear 




ELL AND RICHARDS 

HAVE 

BOOKING AGENTS 



FOR THEIR 

BLACKFACE MUSICAL COMEDY 8PECIALTY. 

Address MYERS & KELLER. 31 W. 31st STREET. NEAT YORK. 



GartelleBros. 

SKATORIALISM 

World and Kingston 

fV VAUO VILLe 



AN ECCENTRIC NOVELTY ACT, 

The Be-Anos 

Now Booking for Next Season. 
MYERS & KELLER. 



FOR SALE 

WIGGINS FARM 



— BEST PLACES TO STOP AT — 



Professional Rates. $i Doable; $1.25 single. 

THH HKKKSHIRK HO'lfcl, 
Jatncs Straus*. Prop. 
721-727 Franklin St., Reading. Fa. 
Four blocks frsiu Orpheum Theatre. One-half 
block from ■tags entrance to BIJou Theatre. One- 
half block from Frankllu St. Depot. 



Professional's Headquarters 
MILLE-K'S HOI EL (American Plan) 
S. E. coruer Tenth and Race Sts.. Philadelphia. 
A new and up-to-date hotel, home comforts. Ruter 
$1.00 and $2.00 per day. Special It.ites to Pro- 
fessionals. Harry C. Miller, Prop. 



rioti-ssioii.il Headquarter) 



. THE BRIDGE HOTEL 

Bowery and Delanecy Sts., N. Y. Cltv, 2 door* 
above Miner's Theatre. Elegant furnished rooms. 
Rooms reserved by letter. Horn and Drlscoll. 
.1. Rellljr. Msrinirer. 



Proprietor* ■ Wrn 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
UHE VAJVDEH-BIL& 

CO*VfHI£*TLr LOOMTFO 



Adams'Mack 

BURLESQUE MAGIC KEITH CIRCUIT 

O. 0. House. Pittsburg, Pa., Week March 19th. 



H. O. 



VIRGINI (\ 



BURTON & RANKIN 

Inthe'TEXAS VOLUNTEER" 
J. A. 8TERNAD, care West. Vaudeville Mgrs.' Ass. 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OF HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

at MKVEKFRLD, JR.. lYee. 

MARTIN HKCK, Ceneral Mansger. 
FRANK VINCKNT, N. Y a>Pt> S m tStlee. 

All Application* for Time Mint he Adrireaaed to 
C E. BRAY, Booking Manager, 
M.lo.tlr Theatre RM ( „ Chi ram. HI. 

WANTED 

MAN TO WORK IN HANDCUFFING ACT. 
MIST BE HOOD ORATOR— (NO AMATEUR). 
SEND PROGRAM. J. A. McFADDEN. 

Address Orpheum Theatre, Denver, Col. 



RETURN IN VAUDEVILLE AFTER AN ABSENCE OF TWO YEARS. 



LaVeen 




Mnmiffemont JACK LEVY, 140 \\\ 42nd St., New York City. 
Something NEW soon. Will let you know soon as copyrights are granted. 

KLEIN-OTT BROS. & NICHOLSON 

Amir/coV Leading Musical jAnUtj 
(MYKRS ft KELLER, Agents.) 

MARCH 5— MIDDLETOWN. CONN, MARCH 10— DANBtJRY CONN. 

MARCH 12— NEW BRITAIN, CONN. MARCH 26— YONKERS, N. Y. 

SPEOIAL FEATURE FEMBERG StOOK OO. 



— - — «» NOW IN VAIJDEVIL.bE •*-—*- 

MARSEILLES 

AMLklGA'S LEADING NOVELTY GYMNAST 

presenting his unique conception "A Puzzle In Black and White" 

Week March 12 — Hathaway's. Lowell. March 19 — Auditorium, Lynn. ADDRESS — WILLIAM MORRIS. 



SHEPPARD CAMP 



*s 



THE MAN FROM GEORGIA 



99 



In Vaudeville 

as 



CHERIDAH SIMPSON 

"THE WIDOW" 

With "The Prince of Pllsen Girls" 

ED. MARKUM Press Rep. 



KITTIE STEVENS 

7 character dances and changes In 10 minutes. 



IRENE LA TOUR 

AND HER -* J* m t% 

CLEVER dog 4*r\£*r\ 
300 West 24th Street NEW YORK 



GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 



If subscribing "as per 
route" mail postal of any 
change to insure receipt. 

Subscribe now 

and be sure of 

VARIETY 

EACH WEEK 



VAUDEVILLE H AOLINEHS 
GOOD STANDARD ACTS 



AND 



If you have an odd opnn week you want to fill at 

short notioe write to W. L. DOCKSTADER, 

Oarrick Theatre, Wilmington, Del. 

Can close Saturday night and make any city cast 

of Chicago to open Monday night. 



. 

\ 






RADOs BERTRAM 

"THE NEW GIRL." 
Revised by Rue titnl ltroche. 

A. H. WOODS 

Can use sister acts and sketch teams for 
neat season. 



VARIETY. 



19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Big Hit at 
Hammer stein's 
Victoria 



The DANCING MITCHELLS 



Always playing the leading vaudeville 

theatres in America 



"HUMAN TOPS" 



May Boley 

AND THE DASHING 

Polly Girus 



it 



AND THE GOMIGAU 

VILLAGE GUT-UPS 



)1 



f\S PRESENTED IN 

RICHARD CARLE'S 
Musical Comedy Triumph 

"The Maid and the Mummy" 

DIREGTIOIN Or M. S. BEINTHAM 



Dave Marion 



r 



IN 



Scenes from New York East Side Life 

"Is genuinely funny." — Chicot. 

20 people in east. Time of act, 20 minutes 

■ 

Address AL SUTHERLAND, St. James Building 



THE 2 




EERS 



Week of March 19th, The Grand, Pittsburg, Pa, 

REPRESENTATIVES 



H. H. FEIBER 



WILLIAM MORRIS 



LIONEL £. LAWRINOE, La to St ago Director New York lhemtro 



BE 



PRESENTS 



RIALTO GIRLS 



99 



Introducing a Stage Rehearsal, showing with absolute fidelity the Other Side" of being 
a SV>w Girl." Stage Hands, Orchestra, Audience, etc., ALL PART OF THIS ACT 



M NORTON i M NICHOLSON 



Booked over the Orpheum, Anderson, Kohl A Castle 
Circuits, beginning Nov., '06 



A 
N 
D 

in "ELLA'S ALL RIGHT" 



Week March 19, Pastor's 



The Past Musters of (iorniau dialect comedians, 



ARTHUR H. KHERNS" MEDORA COLE 

Presenting a farcical absurdity. "THE BARON.*' in Vaudeville. Address, Palace Hotel, Chicago* 



A REFINED STUDY IN HEBREW. 



Le M AIRE am- LeIVl AIRE 



LAUGHINGIZERS AND PARODISTS. 



JOE MORRIS 



mii 



THE HEBREW WITH THC PIPES 



SPISSELL BROS.- MACK 

IN THEIR ORIGINAL ACROBATIC COMEDY 

"SCENES IN A CAFE" 




Electric 
Ballet 



\A/ltH 8 V/ASS/AR GIRLS 




ILLIE 
ESTON 



Imitator of Popular Actors. 

Address WM. MORRIS. 




Watts 



Slnsrlnar and Talking: Comedienne 
In Vaudeville. 



WHALEN &WEST 

in an eccentric comedy act with an abundance of eccentricities, imve a few vacant dates previous 
to our returning to Greet Britain. 



Permanent addrtss, 239 Fast llth St. 



. Theodore Murphy 

Principal Comedian 





With AL REEVES' 
CO. 



THE ORIGINATOR OF THE MESSENGER BOY ON THE VAUDEVILLE STAGE. 

AL. W. MADDOX, Supported by MAYBELLE MELVIN 

PRESENTING THE UNIQUE CHARACTER BRIT 

"A T THE STATION" 

WELL, GUESS THEY ALL 

"CAUGHT US" 

BOOKED 40 WEEKS WHILE PLAYING PASTOR'S LAST WEEK. 

YERS & KELLER, EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 



Correspondents Wanted 

Wherever there is a Vaudeville or Burlesque Theatre 
When antwerifig advertisement* kindly mft\tioi\ Yarjpty. 



20 



VARIETY 






REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Specially engaged for March 5, Washington, D. C; March xa, Baltimore; March 19, Philadelphia; then fonr weeks in New York City. 



The PRANCO- 
AMERICAN 

COMEDIENNE 



JEANETTE DUPRE 



At liberty after April 16. 



For time and terms address (permanently) Hotel Navarre, New York. 



ROSE WENTWORTH 

WAIT FOR THE MEW ACT 



CATHERINE 



SABEL 







In Their Big Scenic Novelty 

"A Dream of Baby Days" 



THE HEAVIEST ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



OPEN AT WILMINGTON WEEK OFjMARCH 19th 



REIFF BROS. 

America's Beet Singing and Dancing Act 

POLI CIRCUIT ASK WM. MORRIS 

A man who's wise will advertise 

And take this as a Hint 
There's not an actor on the stage 

Who doesn't liKe his name in print 



HERZOC'S HORSES 



THE GREAT HORSE SHOW 

MANUEL and JOSEPHINE HERZOG 



MARSHALL 



The Mystic 

and 

His Hats 



And his Germm assistant, SERR PAVL. fust returned from their successful lour of Europe. 

ADDRESS WILLIAM MORRIS 




LEVY 



Popular 
Morning 
Telegraph 
Artist 



Harry Corson Clarke 



ACCOMPANIED BY 



Margaret Dale Owen 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TIME FILLED 



3ry~ except 



HOWARD AND NORTH 

Mr. Fred Karno's <£& &>. 

"A Night in an English Musio Hall" 

Manager, ALF. REEVES. Agents, Wm. MORRIS and H.B. MARINBXI4 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the property of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in I,ondon, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



JAMES THORNTON 

Owing to extensive booking has canceled 

European time 

Phmnm 2490 J Hmrlmm 4<#*>0S», #420 Fifth AVOm, NOW York 

ED LATELL 



Better act than I ever saw you do.— 



JAMES THORNTON 



MAJESTIC Presenting a High 
MUSICAL Class Musical 
FQl R Comedy Act 

Entire new set next sesson. Feature with 
"New York Stsrs" Co. 

Gruet&Gruet 

BLACK FACE COMEDIANS 

En Route Williams' tl Ideals" Co 



COMEDY, ACROBATIC I NOVELTY ACT 

Faust Trio 

V. Jerome. Lottie Freemont, J. Rest, 

with "New York St re." 

OPEN JUNE 3d AND LATER 

Address »39 B. 186th St.. N. Y. City 

NcGloin & Smith 

Artistic Delineators of Refined Singing and 
Wooden Shoe Dancing. 
I Address WM. MORRIS 



BROCKMAN, MACK 

"THE COUNT ON MOTHER'S ACCOUNT" 



BELMONT 

Booked until June 11th. It's a good act 




When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 









21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




Von STUDDIFORD 

RETURNS TO AMERICA 

For a Limited Vaudeville Engagement 

PROCTOR'S 23RD STREET, MARCH 19TH 

58TH STREET, " 26TH 

ALEXANDER STEINER, Manager 



cs 



BESSIE VALDARE'S 

T*RO WE OF Cy CLISTS 

Smartest Dressed and Most Refined Bicycle Act Before the Public. 
Mmnmgemmnt ~ I. Mm OARLE 

VAUDEVILLE'S FAVORITES 

dave GEN ARO AND BAILEY ray 

Assisted by EDDIE SIMMONS 

Will produce in the Month of May their new offering entitled: "TONY" 



AL SHEAN— WARREN, CHAS. 



IN THEIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS CAPT. KIDD 



PER ADD., 81 CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERROR, R Y 



MRS. ANNIE YEAMANS 

^VD VAVGHTEP^ JENNIE 
DECEMBER AND MAY in Vaudeville 



A Pew Press Opinions of Bobby RAYMOND AND CLARE, Maggie Lee En Route N. Y. STARS 



Pittaburg Gaxette. Oct. 28. 
Raymond and Clark are something more tban the 
rapid Are coDTersatlonallats, which they are ad- 
Tertlsed. They are a pair of the beat comedians 
on the variety circuit. Their Jokes are new, and 
yesterday at the Gaiety they kept their bearers 
convulsed with laughter as long as they remained 
on the stage. 



Providence Journal, Sept. 19. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid Are conversationalists, 
have an especially good turn. The man Is partic- 
ularly clever and the woman sings some funny 
parodies. 



and Clark, rapid Are conversationalists, get off a 
number of sprightly local gaga which keep the 
audience in a roar from the time they are on the 
stage until they retire. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 80. 
The Olio acta are all hits. Raymond and Clark 
In their rapid fire conversation and clever parodlea 
captured the laughing honors. The act went with 
a hurrah. 



Pittsburg Chronicle. May 18. 
Raymond and Clark have one of the best conver- 
sational turns ever given at the- Academy. Their 
dialogue Is replete with local coloring. 

Baltimore Sun, May 8. 
Bob Raymond and Maggie Lee Clark have one of 
the best sketches seen at the house this season. 



Hoi yoke Evening Telegram, Feb. 8. 
Raymond and Clark, billed as rapid Are conver- 
sstionsllsts, lived np to their title, snd the pair 
exchanged some of the brightest and wittiest 
repartees heard in the theatre this season. 



Cincinnati Commercial, Oct. 80. 
Raymond and Clark were especially good. The 
introduction of Mr. Raymond upon the scene In a 
most eccentric fall fairly convulsed fhe audience 
with laughter. 



Nashville Banner, Nov. 7. 
The specialties are for the most part below the 
average seen at this house, though there are two 
which show np to excellent advantage. Raymond 



Springfield (Mass.) Daily News, Jan. 80, 1908. 

The hit of the show was scored by Raymond and 
Clark In a rapid Are conversational act that kept 
the audience laughing steadily while they were on 
the stage. They have a barrel of brand new stuff, 
all of which Is bright and clever, and the few 
familiar Jokes that are put In are merely to give 
the audience a rest. 



Kansas City World, Nov. 87. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid Ore conversationalists, 
sent some healthy shots at the local police and 
the notorious union depot. This made a bit with 
the patrons. 

Philadelphia Item, Oct. 18. 
Raymond and Clark were very pleasing In a 
singing and talking act. Their songs are catchy, 
and their witty sayings snd Jokes set the audience 
Into roars of laughter who were loath to leave 
them off the stage. 

Variety. 
Telegraphed to same from Buffalo. 
Raymond and Clark are the beat In the Olio. 
Their act received much favorable comment about 
town on account of the number of original ssytngs 
they have. An origins! act Invariably sets Buffalo 
talking. CHAS". W. GORTZ. 



STUART BARNES 



DIRE 



IOIN GEO. HO/VAAINS 



Carson Bros. 



THE MODERN ATHLETES 



DIRECTION OP P. J. CASEY 



ST. JAMBS BUILDING 



MAY HOWARD 

America's Queen of Burlesque, En Route With Her Own Co. 



DIRECTION OF JAMES E. FENNESSY 



AND STILL 
THEY COME I 



RYAN AND RICHFIELD CO. 



" log Mrs foinei " 

Produced at Tony Pastor's 
Theatre. May 23, 1901. 



ike Hoggern's Doooiftr" 

Produced at Flnrtlg & Sea* 
mon's Music Hall, Oct. 12, 

1003. 



moq Hcooertys Reception ' ' 

Produced at Shea's Theatre, 
Toronto, Can., Feb. 12. 1908. 



(All by Will M. Cressy.) Per. address P. o. Box 86, Sayvllle. L. I., N. Y. 



CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



&&£» 



AGWNT. M. B. MARIMELLI 



Tom Moore 

"Best Singer of Coon Sonj* in \J a a d e hJ i 1 1 e 

WEEK MARCH 10th, KEITH'S, BOSTON. MASS. 



JOSEP 



A BIG HIT ON BROADWAY 




K 



WATSON 



Signed for next season with Krans' "20th Century Maids." "THE LITTLE HEBREW GENTLEMAN." 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



Thanks to managers for kind offers 



22 



VARIETY. 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



M OWATTS-5 

SEASON IOOO RINGLING BROS.-SBASON 1007 EUROPE 




• 



. S. BENTHAM 



PRESENTS 



THE 



ORIGINAL TWEEDLEPUNCH 

"FLORODORA" 



JAS. A. KIERNAN & CO. 



IN 



T 
H 

E 



JAMES HORAN'S 

Latest Musical Comedy Vaudeville 

"Taming the Beast 



W 



93 



"Six Empire Girls 

VA UDEVILL L'S*NE WEST SENS A TION 

DIRECT FROM LONDON. FIRST AMERICAN APPEARANCE. 

EN ROUTE "DREAMLAND BURLESQUERS" FOR 10 WEEKS. 
For Open Time, Address 
CHARLES BELL, Man* er En Rout* Of- Omrm of VARIETY 



D<*N 



CM AS. 



AVERY and HART 

Greatest Colored Team in Vaudeville 
ASK 1A//VI. MORRIS 

THE SINGING SENSATION! 

MAUDE ROCKWELL 

Operatio Soprano Now York Shortly 

M rm CHRIS 0. B HHFM, SUlh Floor, 67 S. Clark Itrtat, Chicago 

DIXON & ANGER 

"The Baron and His Friend" 

In Preparation, a New Act — The Newest in Vaudeville 

ST. ONCE BROS. 

We Have Wheels Too, But We Ride Ours ! 

Direction of the HE Director, P.J. CASEY, St. James Bid*. 

The Famous and Original 

GRAND OPERA TRIO 

IN THE PRISON SOENE FROM "FAUST" 

Booking Agent. WM, MORRIS 



FINISHING SECOND SEASON SPECIAL FEATURE KEITH CIRCUIT 



E 



Smart Songs 
and Costumea. 






N 




An Incomparable Act 



E 



A Neat and 
Original Act. 



HARRY O. 



COMEDIANS, SINGERS 

AND CAL O. 

TRAVESTY STAHS. 



WALT 



MARCH 19. 



proutY 



Trent Theatre, Trenton, N. J. 

Address WM. MORRIS. Per. add. HOTEL SARANAC 



CHAS. J. BURKHARDT 

"The Man With the Funny Slide" 

Thanks to managers for kind offers 
Regards to all friends with " JOLLY CRASS WIDOWS " 



MANAGEMENT MR. T. II. HERR 



WATCH FOR NEXT SEASON! 



CHARLES B. LAWLOR 

AUTHOR AND COMPOSER, PRESENTING 

Gt1ARL.ES 13. LAWLOR and DAUGHTERS 

CHARLES MABEL ALICE 

Author "Sidewalk* of New York." "The Mick Who Throw the Brick," "The Best In the 
House Is None Too Good for Rellly," "How Can Things be on the Level When 
the World Is Round?" AND OTHERS. 

Character, Comedy and Descriptive Vocal Sketch t* 4313 Riverside 



ADAMS 



AND 



DREW 



PRESENTING 

" A BOGUS CHAUFFEUR" 

MANAGEMENT AL SUTHERLAND, ST. JAMES BLDG. 



THE 
PERFECT 



CARL VICTOR, 

IM CLASSIC AMD MUSCULAR POSES AMD FEATS OF STRENGTH 
BIG SUCCESS AT O. O. H.. PITTSBURG. PA.. WEEK MARCH 5th 

BIG 8UCCBSS ON THE KEITH CIRCUIT. For Time. Address 8. K. HODODON 

EUGENE WILLIE 

Howard & Howard 

SINGERS AND COMEDIANS 

Willie— Original Hebrew Messenger Boy. Bugene- Writer of all parodies used in act. 

March 19, Hurllg & Soamon'e 

LEONA THURBER 

4 BLACKBIRDS 

Managers and Agents invited to looK us over 






WEKK OF MARCH 19th»PASTOR'3. 



DIRECTION M. S. BENTHAM. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



»3 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 









W. C. YOUNGSON'S 






SPOOK MINSTRELS 

Booked Solid Until July 2 by WILLIAM MORRIS The Sensational Novelty 

Just returned after successful engagement on Orpheum Circuit 



A TRIUMPH 

IN 

VAUDEVILLE 



V 



Introducing the 

Triple Summersault 



DUFFIN-REDCA Y 
TROUPE 

The Only Aot Doing a Triple. Now Booking Time for Next Season. Address Myers A Keller 

GlLDAY and FOX 

Hebrew Character Comedians 

Week March 6 — Poll's, Waterbury, Conn. Booked solid until June 11 by Wm. Morris. 

Address WM. MORRIS. 

WILFRED CLARKE 

Assisted by MISS THEO CARCW <& CO. 

Presenting His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE and WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 



Eddie Leonard 

A Positive Hit In Vaudeville with 
As sisted by the SHARP BROTHEkS. Address: JACK LEVY, 140 West 4 2d St, N. Y. 

«»< INNESS & RYAN >«<•> 



Booked Solid. 



CONVERSATIONALISTS AND SINGERS. Agt. Jo Paige Smith. 



GHAREES ROBINSON 

America's Famous Character Comedian 

FEATURED WITH THE BIO SUCCESS 

"THE GOEONIAE BELLES " 



ADDRESS. LAMBS' CLUB 




HIT IN VAUDEVILLE 

Collins 

Lata of Jao Wmbor's All-Star Cast 

Per. Address, 186 8th St., Elmhurst, L. I. 'Phone 221 Newtown 

The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 

AND HER 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK GARFIELD 
JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIOHE 
Accompanist 



W. La LYKENS, Manager 

Stagad by ED. ROGERS 



/V\f\rM/\GB.IWB.THT 



Crt/nPUELL A DREW 



By Special Arrangement With Frank L. Perley 

"THE PRINGE GHARMING" 



Late Prima Donna Star of "The Oirl and the Bandit" Opera) 

APPEARS IN VAUDEVILLE 

In a Musical Comedietta Entitled 

"Accidents Will Happen" 



• COPYRIGHTED) 



With Strong Cast Headed by 
George J. MacFarlane and Sidney Bracy 

DIREGTION OP WM. MORRIS 



pjg^ James B. M Rena 

Donovan -Arnold 

The King of Ireland A. QO Queen of Vaudeville 

In their Laughing Succe.u, "TWENTY MINUTES ON BROADWAY." Booked Solid. ASK MORRIS. 



DUMONDS 

PARISIAN STREET SINGERS 

Including JOSEPH DUMOfND, Violin Virtuoso 
Meerch 19— Keiths, Boston 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 






VARIETY 



- 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE ORIGINAL MUSICAL COMEDIAN 



••The Man 

with the 

Talking 
Machine 

For Burlesque, Vaudeville or Faree Comedy 



tt 









IG 



Address en route Tiger Lilies Co.* or 335 3d Ave., N. Y. City 
f\ r hbsr-ty for next season 



THE 3 AMERICAN GIRLS 



Isabella 

HURD 



Maria 

THERESA 

In • refined singing act 



Sadie 

HURD 



BOBBY NORTH 

HEBREW COMEDIAN 

Lata Star "Clrt from Kay'a" SUOOESS IN VAUDEVILLE 

Material by Aaron Hoffman 

J ewell's M annikins 

A ravalation in statecraft, with a reputation encircling the earth. 

World's champion manipulators of wooden actors and actresses 

The Big Agent— P. J. CA8EY, St. James Bldg. 

Harry La. Rose Co. 



IN 



"THE SAILOR AND THE HORSE" 

See William Morris 

Mr. a.d Mrs. GARDNER CRANE ^ GO. 

PRESENTING THEIR NEW PLAY, 

"A YANKEE'S LOVE FOR DIXIE." 

BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JUNE lat. 

PROCTOR'S 23RD STREET, MARCH 19. 

JOHN GRIEVES 

OFFERING HI8 

"Parisian Belles" Co. En route 

THE BEST COMPANY ON THE ROAD 

RO LUCKING 

HILDA THOMAS 



B. C. Whitney's 
SHOW GIRL CO. 



COMEDIENNE 



LITTLE PLAY— BIO HIT. 



"THE BENEDICTION" 

Preaented by FRANCIS OWEN. MINNIE HOFFMAN (St COMPANY 

Now on Poli's Cirouit. Springfield, Mass.. Week March 19. WM. MORRIS IS THE AGENT. 



it 



THE ACT BEAUTIFUL 



99 



PRETTIEST AND BEST GOWNED ACT IN VAUDEVILLE. 



CARTER & BLUFORD 

NOW PLAYING KEITH CIRCUIT. 

Melvin 





ros. 




KATIE 
BARRY 



Keith circuit until June. 
Booked by fl. S. Bent ham. 




I he Moit Marvellous Gymnastic Act In the World 



Hayman <& Franklin 

In 'hair new offering 

"A SUIT FOR DIVORCE" 



Long, loud and legitimate laugh* 
BOOKED BY WILLIAM MORRIS 



"CONVINCING THE CRITICAL." 



THE AMBITIOUS ASSASSINATOR OF MELANCHOLIA." 



"BILLY WALSH" 

Who Talks and Sings 15 Minutes in 1 

(Note) — Ask Klein, Ott Bros, and Nicholson about my trombone. 



OTTO PARIS, lat Tenor. 



HENRY PARIS, Baritone. 



The White City Quartette 

March 19 — Grand O. H., Indianapolis. April 9 — Columbia, St. Louis. 

March 26— Majestic, Chicago. April 16— Open. 

April 2— Haymarket, Chicago. April 23— Temple, Detroit. 

ALL OPEN AFTER. 

WM. PARIS. 2nd Tenor. — GEO. DONALDSON, Baaso. 



TO 




H EAR N 



"THE LAZY JUGGLER" 

Acknowledged by SI ME to be the Funniest Juggling Act in 

America. 

TO MAY BELFORT 

A Refined and Artistic Rendering of Stories in Song 

THAT'S ALL MR. GEO. HOMANS, Manager 

IRENE LEE 

"The Girl in Trousers" 

HARRY THOMSON "••'""""*• 



Brooklyn 



"THE MAN WITH THE GOODS" 

THE ORIGINAL 

Three Madcaps 

NIINA AMY PANSY 



Accomplishing Seemingly Impossible Peats BOOKED SOLID 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Vajluty. 



PANSY 

Address AL. HAVER, St. James Building 



VARIETY 



25 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 







/V.7^ \ 



-ADDRESS J£*J10RR1S 




a^ > 







Address William Morris 

EMMA FRANCIS 

Arabian Whirlwinds 
VAUDEVILLE 



and 
her 



DIRECTION OF PR. 8. BENTHAM 

DORSCH & RUSSELL 

THE MUSICAL RAILROADERS 

Address 408 Morris Ave., Newark, N. J 
or Al. Sutherland 

Still at tie Switch Hat Mm?) 

RICE & PREVOST 

IN 

BUMPTY BUMPS 



Arthur J. Miss Grace 

McWATERS ... TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDEVILLE" 

ALICE 



F. Daly Burgess 

COMBDIAIN 

And in* Dog, - rilNNEGAIN 

In Vaudeville 

THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

FJOE MMM MARK 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week March 12, Portland, Me. 

ED. F.REYNARD 

Ventriloquist 



Primrose and Dock.tader'. 



Season 1901-2 — Great Lafayette Show. 

Season 1902-3 — 

Season 
Season 
Season 
Season 



1 Pri 

( Minstrels and Empire Show. 
1903-4 — Orpheum Show. 
1904-6 — Touring England. 
1905-8 — Touring America. 
1906-7 — Orpheum Show. 

Exclusive Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 



PHILBROOKS 

and SIDNEY 

REYNOLDS 

Present 

"MISS STENO, STENOGRAPHER" 

A Herman Comedy Sketch 

ROLAND WEST 



• • • ^» «j« • • 



JOCKEY JONES 

Manaoamant M yers A Keller, 31 W. 3 1 at St. 



HILL AND SYLVAKY 



Address WM. MORRIS. 

March 19 — New Bedford, Mass. 

March 26 — Lynn, Mass. 



BILLIE RITCHIE 

"The Drunk" 



A Night in an English Music Hall 



EXPOSITION FOUR 

(3 ALEXANDERS and BRADY) 




LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 



Bush Gordon 

"HURLY BURLY COMIQUES" 
In Vaudeville 



Address All First- 
Class Agents 



Gardner iVincent 

"WINNING A QUEEN" 

Booked Solid for 3 Years 

NANON JACQUES 

Singing Comedienne 

WILLIAM MORRIS, Agmnt 



CHAS. B. 



LILLY B. 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloquist and 

The Dancin* Ooll 



In Europe for One Year. 

Plsying Return Dates Everywhere 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. C, 
London, England. 

BURROWS-TRAVIS CO. 

in their up-to-the-minute Comedy Act 



Cha's 



(TWO) 



Alice 




RENTED 



ALICE 



THETLOODS 



II A IT IB 



and Dog "Trlxle." 
Novelty Globe and Unsupported Ladder Act. 



"SNITZ" MOORE 

Management DAVE KRAUS 

H. ELVIN MACK 



JACK INORWORTH 

Presents Till, GOLLEGb BOY 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety 



Comedian at liberty for comedy or btirlesque. 

119 K 14th Street. 



THE FAMOUS 

Colby Family 

Orpheum Circuit until June Oot. 1 , '06, until 
April, 1 907, booked solid. See Morris, • W. 
28th St., N. Y. City, or Wm. H. Colby, per route 



THE PLAYER 



WALTER DANIELS 

IMPERSONATOR OF NOTED ACTORS. 

With make up and changes in view of audience. 
(hlcot In Variety said: "Was called back three 
timet, In a clever bit of acting." 




Joe, Myra, Buster and Jingles 

KEATON 

Eccentric Comedians 

Address THE MAN WITH THE TABLE, WIPE 
AND TWO KIDS. 220 West 38th Street, N. Y., 
care of Ehrlch House. 

Peschkoff Troupe 

Russian National Dancers 



PITROT & OIRARD, Exclusive Agents 
1265 Broadway. New York 



JACK MASON 

Producer and Gen'l Stage Director 

Mgr. Five Society Belles 

Address care of STAIR & HAYLIN 

BROADWAY THEATRE BUILDINO 

4 THE NARROW FELLER." 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 



26 



VARIETY 





CC 



THE 



HIPPODROME 



OF 



VAUDEVILLE" 




MANAGEMENT 
LOUIS WESLEY 




If 



THE 



TOY 
SOLDIER" 



«* 



PROCTOR'S 
NOW 



IT'S EASY TO PLEASE THE PEOPLE WITH A GOOD ACT 



BELL'S 




EMPIRE 



GIRLS 




Now playing their first AMERICAN ENGAGEMENT are featuring the great song successes 

" MOONING," A Real Moon Song. By P. J. BROWN. 

"EVERY ONE IS IN SLUMBERLAND BUT YOU AND ME." By youngs and moors 

"WOULD YOU IF YOU COULD?" (Restricted to Empire Girls) 
I MIMiLS -S I ILLSLIIN MUSIG GO. 1006 Olive St. ST. LOUIS 



AN UNPARALLELED SUCCESS 

JUNE MCOREE & C° 

AT PROCTOR'S 58th STREET 

WEEK MARCH 19th, - - HYDE & BEHMAN'S 



OCEAN TO OCEAN 

SULLIVAN & CONSIDINE 

CIRCUIT 
Largest Circuit of Family Theatres In the World 

Owning and Operating 49 First 'Class Vaudeville Theatres East, North- 
west and West 

\A/ANTPn »* »" times. FIRST-CLASS ACTS OF ALL KINDS that 
ww ™*^ M »*■*• can deliver the goods 

SOLE BOOKING AGENTS 



BERNSTEIN & ONKEN. 

36 W. 28th St., New York City. 
CHAS. WRAY. 810 Denny Bids., Seattle, Wash. 



Management I,OUIS WESLEY 

■ 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



CHRIS. 0. BROWN. 67 B. Clark St, Chicago. 
ARCHIE LEVY, 111 Eddy St., San Franoleoo, Cal. 



VARIETY 



V 



ANNOUNCES: 



66* International 



miwement 






Company 

Incorporated JVetv yorK, 1906 

J. AUSTIN FYNES 

Yresidtnt and Gen' I Manager 

&/>e Nicolet 
Amusement Co. 

INCORPORATED 
NEW YORK 1906 

J. -A X/STIJ* FyjiBS. Pr«. 

THE NICOLET Harlem N. T. 

THE NICOLET Jersey City, N. J. 

THE NICOLET Troy, N. Y. 

THE NICOLET Brooklyn, N. T. 

THE NICOLET Newark, N. J. 

THE NICOLET Albany, N. Y. 



Bijou Theatre 

Jersey City, N. J. 

THE INTERNATIONAL AMUSEMENT 

& REALTY CO., Proprietor* 

J. AUSTIN FYNES, General Manager 

DEVOTED TO VAUDEVILLE 



New 



Theatre 



Fifth Ave. and 125th Street. New York 
THE INTERNATIONAL AMUSEMENT & REALTY CO., Proprietors 

J. AUSTIN FYNES, General Manager. 

DEVOTED TO VAUDEVILLE 



All Communications to 



. AUSTIN FYNES 

Telephone, 3228 John No. 80 WALL STlvEET Cable, "Amusional, N. Y." 



BSfc^^^^m^^^^^^^^^mm^ 



28 



VARIETY. 




Morris 



NOW AT 



THE HOLLAND BUILDING 

1440 BROADWAY, COR. 40TH STREET 



TELEPHONES: 953-954-955 Bryant 



CHICAGO OFFICES 

Will open April 2nd, with Staff from my New York Office 
JESSE L. LASKY, Manager (Formerly with Henry B. Harris) 



SPECIAL ATTENTION will be given to 



SU 





ER PARKS AND FAIRS 



Five Thousand (5,000) First-cJass Acts are Listed on the Books 

BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY THE FOLLOWING LEADING VAUDEVILLE THEATRES: 



P. G. Williams' Colonial. 
P. G. Williams' Orpheum. 
P. G. Williams' Alhambra. 
P. G. Williams' Novelty, Brooklyn. 
P. G. Williams' Gotham, Brooklyn. 
P. G. Williams' Manhattan Beach. 
P. G. Williams' Bergen Beach. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Yonkers. 
Henry Myers' Atlantic City. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Camden. 
Keeney's, Brooklyn. 
Trent Theatre, Trenton. 
Morrison's, Rockaway. 
Henderson's, Coney Island. 
Deimling's, Rockaway. 
International, Chicago. 



• 



Hammerstein's Victoria. 
Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 
S. Z. Poli's, New Haven. 
S. Z. Poli's, Hartford. 
S. Z. Poli's, Worcester. 
S. Z. Poli's, Springfield. 
S. Z. Poli's, Bridgeport. 
S. Z. Poli's, Waterbury. 
S. Z. Poli's, Jersey City. 
S. Z. Poli's, Scranton. 
S. Z. Poli's, Wilkes-Barre. 
Sheedy's, Fall River. 
Sheedy's, Newport. 
Hathaway's, New Bedford. 
Hathaway's, Lowell. 
Hathaway's, Brockton. 



F. F. Proctor's 23d St. 

F. F. Proctor's 5th Ave. 

F. F. Proctor's 58th St. 

F. F. Proctor's 125th St. 

F. F. Proctor's, Newark. 

F. F. Proctor's, Albany. 

F. F. Proctor's, Troy. 

Wilmer & Vincent, Utica. 

Wilmer & Vincent, Reading. 

Wilmer & Vincent, Allentown. 

Weber & Rush, Binghamton. 

Weber & Rush, Schenectady. 

H. H. Lamkin's, Toledo. 

H. H. Lamkin's, Dayton. 

Auditorium, Lynn. 

I. C. Mishler, nth Ave. Opera House, Altoona, 

Pa. 
I. C. Mishler, New Family Theatre, Johnstown, 

XT A* 



12 WEEKS IN NEW YORK CITY WITHOUT A REPEAT, 12 



TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 




VOL. II., NO. 2. 



MARCH 24, 1906. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 

c 




£Sg*'-/ % t /f>//*r /* rr 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 1905, at the post office at New York, N. Y. $ under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



VARIETY 



WILLIAM MORRIS' CHICAGO PLANS. 

William Morris returned from Chicago 
Tuesday morning and expresses himself 
as being well pleased with the result of 
his trip, which was made for the pur- 
pose of selecting a branch office in that 
city. 

"I have taken an office at 167 Dear- 
born street," he said to Variety. "This 
is next door to the New Majestic Thea- 
tre, and gets me in the centre of things. 
The office is well located, and while not 
as large as 1 might wish, it is probable 
that in a short time I shall be able to 
extend the space. Jesse L. Lasky leaves 
next week to take charge, though it is 
not probable that I shall be open much 
before the middle of April. Others of 
the New York staff will accompany Mr. 
Lasky. 

"I^ator on I may increase this force 
with recruits from the Western offices, but 
upon this point I am not decided. 

"Apart from establishing the office, the 
most important accomplishment was the 
arrangement made with a St. Louis cap- 
italist to book for houses to be built in 
that city and Cincinnati. The idea is to 
pattern the houses after the Orpheum in 
Brooklyn, having a restaurant attached, 
and running the same sort of bills. Both 
are to be called the Orpheum. Abe 
Jacobs and *Doc* Freeman may be the 
resident managers. 

"I had some talk about a Milwaukee 
house, but there is already a house there, 
the Crystal, managed by B. F. Williams, 
and booked through the Western Vaude- 
ville Managers' Association. As they 
purpose building a house in opposition 
to their present client, I dropped the idea 
for the present. 

"Another important move is the repre- 
sentation of the Hippodrome in Cleve- 
land. I shall have the exclusive booking 
of this resort and have already placed 
about $50,000 worth of acts, including 
Ralph Johnson, the Cottrells, Mile. Mar- 
quis and Juan Caicedo, all of whom have 
long time contracts. 

"In spite of its location and the fact 
that the house has not previously ranked 
as one of the first class, the Interna- 
tional is doing a big business. They have 
the shows and are drawing the people 
in consequence. 

"In my hurried visit I was not able to 
do more than look over the ground super- 
ficially, but I am satisfied there is plenty 
of room for development out there and 
believe that there will be more vaudeville 
houses in Chicago within a short time. 
There is a field for vaudeville that is not 
fully cultivated, and I feel that an office 
there is needed. 

"I shall give considerable of my own time 
to the Western branch, making frequent 
trips there, and feel safe in saying that 
it is but a question of time when the 
volume of business transacted in Chicago 
will equal that of my New York office." 



MARTIN BECK HOME. 

Martin Beck arrived last Wednesday 
from Liverpool, two days overdue. What 
looked like a streak passed through the 
city and landed in the 20th Century Lim- 
ited. It was Beck en route for Chicago, 
where he will talk things over with Mor- 
ris Meyerfeld, Jr., the president of the 
Orpheum Circuit Company, who awaited 
him there. - 



"K. & E." IN VAUDEVILLE. 

(Special to Variety.) 

Cincinnati, O., March 21. 

Klaw & Erlanger have sent a telegram 
to John II. Ilavlin of the Grand Opera 
House, directing Mr. Havlin to secure a 
site for the erection in Cincinnati of a new 
vaudeville theatre. Mr. Havlin immedi- 
ately sent a letter to A. L. Erlanger 
asking for particulars respecting the size 
of the lot and all particulars. 

'Hie telegram states that Messrs. Ander- 
son and Ziegler ought tb have opposition 
in Cincinnati in their vaudeville enter- 
prise, and in furtherance of a plan of op- 
position to those who are giving aid to the 
Shubert-Belasco syndicate. A. L. Er- 
langer, who signed the telegram, states 
that he has secured the cooperation of Ed- 
ward Stair, Sr., of the Stair-Havlin firm, 
controlling a chain of theatres, which is 
conceded to be one of the strongest book- 
ings in the country. Mr. Erlanger fur- 
ther says that he and Mr. Stair have ne- 
gotiated to the point of the latter guaran- 
teeing first class connecting towns all over 
the country for superior vaudeville at- 
tractions. Mr. Havlin has already ne- 
gotiated with several parties for a suitable 
site and is awaiting a reply from A. 
L. Erlanger for specific instructions as to 
the size of the lot desired. 

Manager H. If. Ziegler of the Columbia 
Theatre, when interviewed about the new 
house, laughed at the idea and declared 
his belief that no such theatre would be 
established. 



HURTIG & SEAMON IN NEWBURG. 

A report of seeming authenticity was cur- 
rent this week that Hurtig & Seamon have 
secured a site for a new vaudeville theatre 
in Newburg by the direct purchase of a 
plot of ground in the main business part 
of the city. Ground, so it is said, will be 
broken for the building within the next 
month or so, and the enterprise will be in 
operation by next season. 

The agents were also wondering whether 
or not the same firm intended to put an- 
other house on 125th street. They are 
known to have bought a corner lot at 
125th street and Park avenue, but placards 
on the buildings declare that they are to 
be renovated and made into first class 
stores. 

The supposition is advanced that per- 
haps the managers have purchased the 
property as a pure investment for the pres- 
ent with an idea that in the future the 
stand will be a valuable one for theatrical 
purposes. 



HOMANS IS HURT. 

George Homans is grieved because none 
will accept seriously his lease of the Her- 
ald Square Theatre. It pains him that 
men who have known him for years wax 
facetious, and therefore from his heart 
outward he speaks. "I have spent $28,000 
since the acquisition of the house," he 
said the other day, "and this is all my 
own money. No other capital is inter- 
ested in the venture except that a certain 
vaudeville manager of national reputa- 
tion guaranteed the rental. I am going 
to open and run the house myself." 

When the red fire has burned out and 
the calcium man has shut off the gas, it 
will probably be found that the Shu- 
berta have the house, as was announced 
in last week Wari c ty. 



STILL TALKING MERGER. 

Although the Eastern and Western bur- 
lesque "wheel" magnates have continued 
their conferences, it is not apparent that 
any good will result therefrom. The 
Western men declare that no show will 
clean up less than $5,000 on the season, 
and that on April 15 they will have con- 
cluded the scheduling of the companies for 
next season. 

The Eastern managers are opposed to 
taking over any of the shows owned by 
house managers, contending that the best 
interests are served when house and com- 
bination managers stick to their individ- 
ual lines. The Westerners scoff at the 
suggestion that they give up what has 
been found to be a profitable venture and 
there the discussion seems to rest. 

The Western men declare that they will 
have two new houses in town next sea- 
son, one in direct competition with the 
Dewey and another to oppose the Gotham 
on 125th street. If the Circle stays in 
there will be a third house put up near 
Columbus Circle. 

It has been settled that Frank B. Carr's 
Unique Theatre in Brooklyn will be 
dropped from the Western Wheel, and 
there may be another Brooklyn house left 
out of the fold. Each wheel announces 
two new houses in Brooklyn, the details 
of which are delightfully vague. 

From all appearances the Western men 
purpose going ahead with no expectation 
of a merger, and the change, if any, will 
come after next season. 



WHAT WILLIAMS OFFERED. 

Percy Williams recently received a let- 
ter from a man who wrote on a livery sta- 
ble letterhead as follows : 

Bernardsvllle, N. J., March 14, 1906. 
MT. Williams: 

Dear Sir — I have JuHt opened a theatre at this 
place and would like to pull off a show every two 
weeks. What can you do for us, say about eight 
people in a company? We don't want anything 
too loud, for the town people won't stand for It. 
Waiting your reply, yours, 

r. B. BALLENTINE. 

This is what Mr. Williams wrote in an- 
swer: 

Ballentiae Bros.: 

Gents — Yours received. I could pull off this 
show April 1st, If not too loud for the Bernards- 
vllle town people: 

The Two Vestas, 

Tilley and Victoria. 

In a Refined Boxing Bout. 



De Vrles and Roberts, 
Costume Wrestling Match. 



Homans' Herald Square Quintet. 
Introducing "There's a Dark Man Coming With a 

Bundle." 



Lykens and Levy, 
Pie Eating Contest. 



The Morris Vaudeville Guards, 
Presenting Their Holland Building Stair Climbing 

Feats. 



Terms: CO for troupe; 4') for opera house. With 
use of your livery stable for one dress rehearsal. 
Yours truly, 

P. G. WILLIAMS. 
P. S - Is your Orchestra a union man? 



MRS. BROWN-POTTER SURE. 

M. S. Bentham, the agent, received a 
cable the past week from Herman Oppen- 
heimer, who was commissioned by Mr. 
Bentham when leaving for the other side 
to secure Mrs. James Brown-Potter at 
any price. Mr. Oppenheimer said that 
Mrs. Brown- Potter had been signed and 
would shortly appear provided the week- 
ly salary of $2,500 be forthcoming. It is 
understood that a few managers have 
agreed to pay that much for twelve 
weeks anyway. 



MANAGERS SUED. 

Toledo, March 23. 
As a result of the arrests made here a 
week ago Sunday of artists who appeared 
at the Empire, Arcade and Burt's theatres, 
George H. Ketcham, Moses T. Bloch and 
Charles Potter, the managers of the re- 
spective houses, have been sued in three in- 
stances for $25,000 for false arrest. 



ANOTHER FOR WESTERN WHEEL. 

Chicago, March 23. 
It is understood here that Sid J. Euson's 
Theatre, where stock burlesque is now be- 
ing played, will be taken into the Western 
Wheel for next season either with or with- 
out Mr. Euson. 



MORE FOR INTERSTATE. 

The Interstate Circuit has added two 
new theatres to its string, which will be 
known as the Majestic theatres. The 
one at Little Rock will open April 2, under 
the management of Charles Clair. This 
house cost $65,000. It is of Romanesque 
architecture. At Birmingham the opening 
is set for April 9. The manager has not 
yet been appointed. 



MOZART DENIES. 

Edward Mozart, who controls a four- . 
house circuit in Pennsylvania, was in town 
this week, and took occasion to declare 
that there is absolutely no foundation for 
the report that his theatres may be ab- 
sorbed by the Keith people. 

"A. Paul Keith and J. K. Burke were in 
Lancaster, where I have my headquarters, 
some time ago, but the visit was entirely 
a friendly one," said Mr. Mozart. "My 
houses are doing nicely and are not on 
the market. I am sufficiently satisfied 
with my proposition to be willing to ex- 
tend it. I am building in one city, have 
secured a site in another and hope before 
may seasons have passed to be interested 
in nearly a score of vaudeville theatres. 
They will all be within a limited territory 
and be accessible one from the other bv 
trolley car.' 



n 



SOME KEITH NOTES. 

A rumor from Pawtucket says that 
the Keith house there will be open for 
vaudeville again next season, it playing 
stock at the present time. Pawtucket is 
near Providence, "almost" on the way to 
Boston. 

A report around town that B. F. Keith 
had entered into an arrangement with 
Cahn & Crant to play the latter's circuit 
of combination houses in New England 
with the Keith bookings probably arose 
from the arrangement still in effect at 
the Lowell Theatre, which Keith recently 
lost. A few future bookings were accept- 
ed by Fay Brothers & Hosford to relieve 
the Keith agency of any embarrassment. 

The Bijou Theatre in Binghamton is 
coveted by Keith, and some negotiations 
are under way. 

One of the two theatres in Manchester, 
N. II., a city of about 00,000, will be 
turned over for vaudeville under the 
Keith direction before the season closes. 
Vaudeville is about the only thing left 
for Manchester, that town being notori- 
ously a poor one for legitimate shows. 



Maud Courtney is here, having per- 
formed the sad duty of bringing her 
mother's remains to this country for 
burial. 



VARIETY 



WR1ETY 

A Variety Paper fer Variety People. 

Published CTery Saturday by 
THE VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
1402 Broadway, New York City. 

Telephone 18:17— 38th St. 



8IME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 
22, lftOB, at the post office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Aunual $* 

Foreign • 

Six and three months In proportion. 
Single copies fire cents. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent address 
or aa per route, as desired. 

Copyright 1906 by Variety Publishing Co. 
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION. 



Vol. II. 



No. 2. 



VARIETY announces "fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. That's 
VARIETY. 

Fleurette Dc Mar and Tom Fortune, in 
'•My Sweetheart," have been booked for 
<»ne year solid. 



Van and Maddox intend to put out a 
minstrel organization composed entirely 
of girls, carrying thirty of them inclusive 
of a female orchestra. 



Edna Collins, wife of Stuart Kollins of 
l'olk and Kollins, is coming over. Miss 
Collins is now in London. M. S. Bentham 
will direct the engagements. 



John J. Iris lasted a week at Myers' 
Doric in Yonkers. Mr. Iris says that was 
plenty, and his only regret is that he 
received only three days pay for his 
services. 



De Witt, Burns and Torrance sailed 
Wednesday for South Africa, where they 
will play the Ilymans houses for three 
mother's remains to this country for 
African time. 



At Sutherland's "County Fair," with 
Xeil Burgess, is reported by Mr. Suther- 
land to he playing to big business through 
the one-night stands of New England. 
Air. Sutherland has no intention, though, 
of giving up vaudeville for the legitimate, 
this venture having been what is known 
as a "flyer." 



William Morris is offering thirty-two 
weeks for next season. 



Seymour and Dupre will leave for Aus- 
tralia on May 7 for a tour of five months. 



Violet Rolls, of "The Earl and the 
Girl" will soon leave that piece for 
vaudeville. 



Edmund Day is writing a new sketch 
for Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Crane. 



Roast, the foreign animal trainer, will 
send over another "musical" horse, open- 
ing at the Hippodrome April 16. 



Hoey and Lee have in construction a 
new act to be produced later in the sea- 
son. One more person will be added and a 
special setting provided. 

Barney Gerard, the manager of Miner's 
Bohemians, has been commissioned to 
turn out several musical pieces and bur- 
lesque numbers for next season. 



Al Mayer will give this year's annual 
benefit for Jake Lubin, treasurer of 
Miner's Eighth Avenue, to-morrow night. 



The Keith Agency is offering forty 
weeks for next season, that covering the 
Western time including the Orpheum 
circuit, et al., which is not (as yet) di- 
rectly controlled by Keith. 



Cliffe Bersac will be one of the season's 
features at the Hammerstein roof this 
summer, playing the entire three months 
the aerial resort is open. 



Polk and Kollins and the Carmen Sis- 
ters were put in the bill at the Colonial 
Monday afternoon to replace Therese 
Renz, who Ls suffering from tonsilitis. 

When Lee Harrison makes his reentry 
into vaudeville he will have as a vehicle a 
sketch by W r ill D. Cobb. Harry Herm- 
sen will take Harrison's part in the Weber 
burlesque. 



Anna Boyd, who never seems to forget 
that she was the Widow in "A Trip to 
Chinatown," is going to try vaudeville 
again. Jack Levy will manage her. 

Proctor's Twenty-third Street Theatre 
has its headliners secured for the next 
eight weeks. 



Anna Fitzhugh has returned from Chica- 
go, and the announcement is made that 
she will presently be seen about the 
Eastern vaudeville houses in a new sing- 
ing act. 



McWaters and Tyson have been booked 
solid until December. While playing the 
Alhambra recently Miss Tyson sprained 
her voice, taking the following week to 
heal the bruise. 



Yvette Guilbert, the French "diseuse,'* 
will open at Proctor's Twenty-third 
Street on April 16. 



Delia Fox, who has worked ninety out 
of the last ninety-three weeks, will soon 
leave vaudeville to form one of the quar- 
tet of operatic stars to appear later in the 
season at a Broadway house. 



LEO GARRIUUO'S CARTOON OP THE WEEK 




WELL? 



It is claimed that Julian Hose is using 
a parody medley of patriotic airs which 
he obtained through the employment of a 
stenographer, who jotted the words down, 
after the privilege of singing the song had 
been denied Mr. Rose. 



Recently an act was offered twenty 
weeks of Keith time for next season. The 
salary was satisfactory in consideration of 
the time furnished, hut the agency was 
asked for a guarantee over Mr. Keith's 
signature. This was refused and contracts 
were returned unsigned. 

Tlie New Family Theatre of Brooklvn 
has opened it- 1 doors to the public as a re 
fined vaudeville house. The new theatre 
is under the management <»t* Al G, Flour 
noy, well known In San Francisco and Chi- 
eago as one of the hustling managers of 
the Sullivau-Considine .staff. The prospects 
of this theatre seem bright nnd rosy. 



Alma Moor, a former chorus girl of the 
"Buster Brown" company, attempted sui- 
cide at Topeka, Kan., while a member 
<>f the Gaiety Stock Company there. She 
will recover. A love affair is supposed to 
he responsible. 



The Hodginis will open at the Hippo- 
drome on December 24. 



Qua Sun will open a vaudeville theatre 
at Chillicothe, 0., April 23. 



i 



So well pleased is Tom Miner with the 
showing made by the Bohemian Bur- 
lesquers on their recent Western trip that 
he announces that next season he will 
feature Andy Gardner, Ida Nieolai and 
Will 11. Ward in Harney Gerard's latest 
musical comedy. 

A wreck on the Rio Grande Railway in - 
the Wesl late last week caused much 
fear at the Orpheum Theatre in Denver 
that Lew Sully was seriously injured in 
it. ;is he did not appear when due. Mr. 
Sully canceled, however, hut, would have 
heen on the train otherwise. The Six 
Salvaggis replaced him on the Orpheum 
lull. 



Vest a Victoria will have all new songs 
when she conies to the Colonial next week 
for her farewell engagement. 



Two of the girls who appeared in James 
Forbes/ "Poster Oirls" have decided to do 
;i sister act, and will be known as Malveen 
and Thomas. 



Tom Kelly the tenor will give a vaude- 
ville entertainment and reception at Am- 
sterdam Opera House on Sunday evening, 
April 15. 

(tertrude Fori of "Aladdin's I^amp" is 
going i" i»e t'e center of a comedy sketch 
in vaudeville under the management of 
Oorge II- Brown. 



VARIETY 



Wttf the Vaudeville Artists 

of America Should Organize 



BY EPES W. SARGENT. 



The most prompt and emphatic solu- 
tion to the vexed question of organization 
among artists would be the formation 
in this country of a branch of the Inter- 
national Artisten Logo of Berlin, could 
such an arrangement be made. Twice an 
effort has been made to induce the I. A. L. 
to establish a branch here for the benefit 
of the American artist, but the committee 
has decided that this would not be wise, 
and the best thing to be done would be 
the establishment of an organization upon 
almost similar lines. 

The I. A. L. was founded to overcome 
contract and other abuses in the German 
theatres. Even at their worst the condi- 
tions here were better than those prevail- 
ing in the German houses, where the con 
tracts were so framed as to practically 
release the manager from all responsibility 
for any action he might take while af- 
fording the artist no protection whatever. 

Conditions finally became so bad that 
there was immediate need of a reforma- 
tion and the I. A. L. became a fact. 

At first there was a disposition to fight 
the artists, but the leading managers early 
perceived that the benefit would be mutual 
and fell into line, thereby forcing others 
to do so. 

The fundamental principles of the Loge 
are first the adoption of a contract form 
equitable to both parties to the agree- 
ment, and afterward the enforcement 
of such contracts whether the offender be 
artist or manager. 

To that end a law committee was 
formed composed of the Legal Director 
of the Loge, together with certain of its 
officers and members. Artists with griev- 
ances were required to appeal to this com- 
mittee, stating the case in full. 'Hie 
manager's side was heard and then, if 
the committee decided that there was just 
cause for complaint, the artist assigned 
his case to the Loge, which prosecuted for 
him. 

Under German law both parties in a 
suit are not permitted to give sworn tes- 
timony, the presumption being that such 
a procedure would encourage perjury. 
The judge decides which litigant should be 
sworn and the other is only permitted 
to make a statement. In theatrical cases 
it was usually the manager who was 
sworn, but there was no bar to a sworn 
deposition from the artist if the Loge 
was the plaintiff, and by this means a 
great bar to success was removed. 

Before bringing suit every effort is made 
.to adjust matters, but once it is found 
impossible to settle matters out of court 
the case is pushed to the limit, and once 
the points of law have been decided it 
seldom happens now that the manager 
holds out for a suit, knowing that he no 
longer fights a single performer or act, 
but the entire profession. 

But where an artist breaks a contract 
with a manager the manager also pos- 
sesses the right of appeal to the Loge, and 
the artist being found in the wrong he 
i.» compelled to make amends or forfeit 
all of his rights. 

In addition to the legal features there 



M a benefit branch and performers ad- 
judged worthy may obtain loans, often 
*a ving an engagement through, being pro- 
vided with the funds with which to move 
a large troupe a long distance. 

For the benefit of members traveling 
abroad centers were established in each 
country, one artist serving as executive 
member ^djJd being practically president 
of that branch. Weekly meetings were 
held, the reports and comment being 
transmitted to the Central at Berlin. 

The London branch has finally developed 
into a prosperous affair with an office with 
a secretary in charge and is in affiliation 
with the Music Hall Benevolent Fund, the 
Music Hall Artists Railway Association, 
the Water Rats and the Terriers. 

For a time after the establishment 
many cautious members who had joined 
the society in Berlin dropped their mem- 
bership in the fear that the English man- 
agers would resent the appearance of a 
belligerent organization of artists, but 
the affairs were skilfully administered 
and not only has this membership been 
regained, but hundreds of other repre- 
sentative artists have since added their 
names to the roll. 

It was some three or four years ago that 
the New York branch petitioned the Cen- 
tral to establish an office here. The mat- 
ter was discussed at length and was favor- 
ably considered until it was shown that 
the Loge did not meet the requirements 
existing on this side of the water. The 
American legal representative, William 
Grossman, made a trip to Berlin a couple 
of years ago for the purpose of discuss- 
ing the matter with the heads, and it 
was half promised that one of the ex- 
ecutives would visit this country for the 
purpose of looking over the ground, but 
the idea was abandoned. 

The Loge admits to membership only 
the owners of troupes and actors owning 
a part of an act in their own right. 'Hie 
set fees are but seventy-five cents monthly 
and it was argued that protection and in- 
surance could not be given here on any 
such income, while if the rates were raised 
to the amount required it would entail a 
hardship upon those members of the I. A. 
L. visiting America. 

There is no question but that an or- 
ganisation framed along the same lines 
and composed of American artists would 
be welcomed bv the I. A. L. It is more 
than probable that arrangements could 
be made whereby prompt assistance could 
be given Americans abroad, and vice 
versa, each body reimbursing the other 
for such outlavs as might be made at its 
icquest. 

This would be by far the best solution 
of (he problem which confronts the actor 
to-day. He would have the advantage of 
t he experience of the older body, he would 
be working along lines already shown to 
l»c successful in such widely varying 
countries as Germany and England and 
above all he would have the cachet of 
established success and affiliation with a 
body of general continental influence. 

It would be in no sense a fight organiza 



tion, it would offer protection to manager 
and performer alike, it could bring about 
a revolution in the booking business and 
make one of the most important amuse- 
ment ventures in the country something 
other than a mass of abuses. 



HOW STANDS LAM KIN? 

No one seems to be fully aware how 
If. H. Lamkin, of Toledo, stands. Mr. 
Lamkin manages the Arcade there and 
has had weekly vaudeville bills booked 
through the office of William Morris for 
some time. 

About a year or so ago Lamkin called 
on E. F. Albcc, the Keith general man- 
ager, while the latter was in Cleveland 
on one of his periodical trips, and offered 
to come into the Keith Agency, provided 
•!. K. Burk received no more bookings 
from that source for his Toledo Park. 
Mr. Albee would not agree to the propo- 
sition, anil no more was heard until this 
week, when it became known that some 
acts were being booked for Lamkin's 
house through the Keith office. 

At the St. James Building it was said 
bv a Keith minion that the exclusive 
booking had not been received; that acts 
often were booked through their office 
for Lamkin, but elsew r here it is gen- 
erally understood that Lamkin has 
"switched," induced to do so by the 
threatened invasion of Toledo by Keith 
through the Valentine Theatre there. 

If Keith has Lamkin, it is likely that 
he also has acquired the Valentine Thea- 
tre, which will be useful in keeping Mr. 
Lamkin in line, his indecision in the mat- 
ter of bookings having become noted in 
vaudeville circles. 

KEITH MAKING OVERTURES. 

It is understood that Weber & Rush 
were recently approached to place the 
bookings of their several houses through 
the Keith Booking Agency. Several 
highly colored promises accompanied the 
proposition. The firm are at present hav- 
ing their bills arranged in the offices of 
William Morris. 

AN ANIMAL ODDITY. 

Vasile Papeacu, for some years Hagen- 
becfc'i chief trainer, and who was the first 
to induce a lion to appear comfortable on 
an elephant's back, is now under the man- 
agement of M. S. Hentham with a new act. 
A black bear has been trained to ride a 
white Arabian steed by Mr. Papescu, and 
the dumb duo will be seen shortly, either 
in vaudeville or at the Hippodrome. 



FRED WALTON'S OWN SHOW. 

On April 30, at Hyde & Behman's 
Adams street theatre, • in Brooklyn, 
Fred Walton, the English pantomimist. 
will head a bill composed only of feature 
acts. The bill as then appearing will be 
fl travelling vaudeville aggregation of 
-tars, playing the larger cities Fast for a 
limited time. 



THE "HIP" RETRENCHING. 

Commencing next Wednesday, the 
"plunging horses" will be reinsated at the 
Hippodrome, occupying the time now 
Kiven to the jungle .scene. Various reasons 
are ascribed as the motive for the move. 



BOWERY. 

May Howard has been an unfamiliar fig- 
ure in Eastern affairs the past few years, 
she having been kept out of the burlesque 
field here by the combination of managers. 
The Western Wheel has given her the op- 
portunity to shine once more and the boys 
are glad to welcome her return. One 
thing may always be said of the Howard 
show, it is more tastefully dressed than 
any other organization on the road, for 
she possesses a taste in design and color 
effects that could be put to good use in 
more pretentious lines did she so elect. 
There are half a dozen sets of costumes 
for the chorus that are markedly effective, 
one of them, the last used in the after- 
piece, being a dream in subdued colorings. 
In the first part she is so busy changing 
her dress that she has small time for the 
stage, but comes on long enough to show 
four gowns handsome enough to deserve 
the title of creations. There is a good 
olio and the farces are no worse than the 
rest of this season's output. The last is 
mercifully short because of the extended 
olio ; the opening is reminiscent and 
lengthy. Several men appear to be con 
sidered comedians without any very just 
claims to such classification, but before 
the audience is bored the girls come on and 
sing. May Belle (without her jewelry dis- 
play) is there to remind of the old Sam 
T. Jack stock and it seems that the only 
blown-in-the-bottle Ed Morris is with this 
show. He was announced last week as 
with the Grieves outfit. The Grieves 
Morris is more like the Ed Morris who 
used to play at what is now the Princess 
than the Ed Morris who did, for Morris 
has grown careless in his work. Ruby 
Marion and Amy Thompson invade the 
first part with cornet duets. It is brief, 
its best point. The regular olio is better, 
Russell and Locke do some dancing that is 
really good and the Musical Craigs have an 
instrumental act that is better than the 
average. Price and Edwards in a comedy 
act should be left out of the olio and con- 
fined to the burlesque, but Lavelle and 
Grant do a strong man acrobatic act. 
showing real work and a couple of new 
ideas. They could cut out the muscle pa- 
rade, which no longer interests, with profit 
to themselves, for they can make more di- 
rect appeal with their acrobatic work. 
Yuma is made the feature. He does an 
act similar to Zutka and is said to be that 
performer under a new name. He works 
the automaton feature awkwardly but re- 
deems himself with a ring specialty that 
possesses far more interest than the aver- 
age performance of this sort. There are 
living pictures badly draped sandwiched 
in between the numbers. Taken in all it 
is a show that pleases, its principal need 
being stronger comedy. Chicot. 



Rae and Benedetta will joint the Orrin 
Bros.' circus on April 22. 



LILLIAN RUSSELL BACK. 

Lillian Russell, at one time known as 
;i prima donna, arrived into New York 
last Wednesday and dropped into Rector's 
in the evening, where she held a levee, 
even holding the waiters spellbound by 
the gorgeousness of her get-up. 



CHERRY SIMPSON SINGLE AGAIN. 

(heridah Simpson, who was the leader 
of the disbanded City Girls, will go on 
alone now in vaudeville, opening in a 
week or so. 



VARIETY 



Dean of Vaudeville Celebrities 



Last Thursday Tony Pastor celebrated 
the forty -first anniversary of his assump- 
tion of management by appearing on the 
stage of his own theatre. The reception 
accorded him left no doubt in his mind 
of the esteem in which he is held by the 
artist and his audiences alike. 

But someting more was celebrated; the 
birth of what is now called "vaudeville," 
for it is to Tony Pastor that credit is due 
for the alteration of a specialty perform- 
ance from a thing gross in conception and 
catering only to men into a perform- 
ance possessing the varied interest of the 
old form of entertainment with the added 
brightness that cleanliness induces. 

To Mr. Pastor is not only due the credit 
lor developing the business, but since his 
first connection with the profession he has 
been ever ready to lend a helping hand to 
the artist struggling to gain recognition. 
It is the custom to recall that it was he 
who gave an opportunity to many of the 
Broadway stars while ignoring the fact 
that many of the stars of the next decade 
will be glad to ascribe to Mr. Pastor's 
sympathy their initial start. 

The little house on Fourteenth street 
that bears his name is still the home of 
many debuts not now considered important 
but which will be recalled when the pres- 
ent beginner has gained a position of 
prominence, and there are hundreds of 
actors who remember with gratitude his 
ready sympathy and assistance when they 
were endeavoring to place their act before 
the New York managers and agents. 

Mr. Pastor first came into public notice 
as a church singer when in the old Dey 
Street Church in 1843 he sang duets with 
Christian B. Woodruff, afterward a State 
Senator and politician of note. 

His work in this capacity attracted the 
attention of the Barnum management and 
the following year found him singing at 
Barnum's Museum billed as a child prod 
igy. His next engagement was with Ray- 
mond & Waring's Menagerie, where a 
stage performance was given in connec- 
tion with the exhibition of a collection of 
wild beasts. He appeared in burnt cork, 
playing tambourine and singing in the 
minstrel first part. 

He was then apprenticed to John L. 
Nathans, and made his sawdust debut in 
the fall of 1847 at Welch's National 
Amphitheatre in Philadelphia. Circuses 
were small enough in those days to per- 
mit the performance of afterpieces and in 
addition to riding in the entree and doing 
tumbling he played juvenile parts in these 
farces. 

When summer came he took to the road 
with Welch, Delavan & Nathan's cir- 
cus, spending the following winter in Bos- 
ton at the Federal Street Theatre but 
going back to the tents when the red 
wagons started out. 

He finally became ringmaster and did 
"Pete Jenkins," a rural character who en- 
tered the ring apparently intoxicated but 
who finally stripped to ring costume and 
did a riding specialty. The winter of 
1852 found him at the Bowery Amphithe- 
atre acting as ringmaster and playing 
parts in the drama and the next year he 
was doing "bones" with a minstrel show 
in town. 



Then he developed his specialty as a 
singing clown and in 1854 traveled with 
Mabie's circus, going the following year 
with Levi North's circus. 

His real New York career may be said 
to date from 1801 when he opened at the 
Broadway Music Hall, subsequently going 
to the American Theatre — the famous 
"444" Broadway. Here he remained for 
four years, with occasional trips to the 
larger towns. 

March 22, 1805, saw the birth of "Tony 
Pastor's Own Company" at Paterson, N. 
J., whence he went on tour, winding up 
with a four weeks engagement in Boston. 

Mr. Pastor then joined hands with Sam 
Sharpley, an old time minstrel manager, 
and together they opened Tony Pastor's 
Opera House at 201 Bowery, the site of 
the present People's Theatre. 

Sharpley soon retired leaving Mr. Pas- 
tor in full control. With no partner to 
consult Mr. Pastor determined to put into 
practice a theory he had long held. He 
announced that the house would cater 
particularly to women and family parties. 
It was a daring innovation in a day when 
few women attended such an entertain- 
ment and those were of a type who had 
small reputation to lose. 

Friday nights were designated as ladies' 
nights, when women with escorts were 
not required to pay, and there were ladies' 
matinees on Tuesdays with a prize rang- 
ing from a ham to a silk dress or a sew- 
ing machine. The shows were kept free 
of any offensive line or bit of business and 
before long the stag audiences had be- 
come a thing of the past at Pastor's. Mr. 
Pastor little realized then that he was 
building the foundation of a business in 
which millions of dollars would later be 
employed. 

It was ai his house that the first pro 
duction of a farce comedy as it is now un- 
derstood was performed under the title of 
"Fun on the Stage"; at the same house 
was offered the first condensed opera and 
here was first seen Hoyt's initial success, 
• A Rag Baby." 

Among those who were helped to suc- 
cess by Mr. Pastor are Lillian Russell, 
the Sappho Hansel Troupe, May Irwin, 
Nat Goodwin! Evans and Hoey, the French 
Twin Sisters, Francis Wilson, Ward and 
Voices, Weber and Fields, Denman Thomp- 
son, William J. Scanlan, Jennie Yeamans, 
Harry and John Kernell, Pat Ilooney, Wil- 
liam Harris (the theatrical manager), Har- 
ridan and Hart, Hallen and Hart, Harry 
Miner, Daniel Sully, Gus Williams, Neil 
Burgess andjnany others. 

He also made known to America a 
goodly list of English artists, including 
Vesta Tilley, Vesta Victoria, Jenny Hill, 
Bessie Bonehill, Bessie Bell wood, Pacquer- 
ette and the Orrin Brothers, who now man- 
age the circus bearing their name in the 
City of Mexico. 

Mr. Pastor is the most active advocate 
of the Actors' Fund in the vaudeville 
branch and has accomplished great good 
for that excellent charity, while his an- 
nual treat to the stage children at Christ- 
mas is one of the mast unique celebrations 
at that period. From his first assumption 
of managerial power he has worked for 
others as well as for himself. No one will 



ever know all the good he has done, for his 
charity is without ostentation, but he has 
helped literally thousands and no man 
by his accomplishments, his personality 
and his friendships has made a more last- 
ing mark in vaudeville or history. May 
lie be spared to celebrate his golden jubilee 
and beyond. 



AFTER THE AGENTS. 

The law governing employment agents 
in general, and vaudeville agents in par- 
ticular, came up in the Legislature at Al- 
bany this week when a hearing was had on 
a proposed amendment before the commit- 
tee to which it had been referred. 

The question of commission was thor- 
oughly discussed, and the servant employ- 
ing people protested against any one ex- 
cepting themselves receiving over five per 
cent An attempt will be made to have a 
clause inserted in the law prohibiting over 
that amount being hereafter charged ; also 
that no manager may accept or demand 
commission for booking acts in his own 
theatres, and that any manager booking 
acts for other than his own theatres, charg- 
ing commission therefor to either party, 
shall be deemed an agent and required to 
comply with the provisions of the agency 
law. 

The amendment seems to have been 
aimed at the Keith Booking Agency in this 
city, which has avoided the issue up to 
now by claiming it might be called any- 
thing, but not an agent. This has re- 
sulted in saving Mr. Keith $25 yearly be- 
sides the liability incurred by placing a 
bond with the city authorities. 



NEW COPYRIGHT LAW. 

The new copyright law now under con- 
sideration in Congress will prove of espe- 
cial interest to authors and composers if 
finally passed by that body. 

It specifically provides that a musical 
composition may be copyrighted at any 
time, either before or after production, 
and such protection afforded by the copy- 
righting to remain effective for fifty years 
after the author's death, if the heirs or 
assigns of the deceased desire to claim 
that option. 



A PHILADELPHIA THEATRE TO 
LEASE. 

With the uncanny ambiliou of vaude- 
ville managers to secure new houses, 
whether in exclusive territory or oppo- 
sition, the field in Philadelphia appears 
to have been altogether overlooked. 

There is a house on Chestnut street in 
Sleepyville which may be leased for $40,- 
000 yearly, said to be a moderate figure. 



COMING BACK. 

Thomas Q. Seabrookc cannot get over 
his infatuation for vaudeville. For a time 
he has been appearing in "Mexicana," but 
in about two weeks be will pack his som- 
brero away with moth balls and take to the 
two-a-day again. It is not announced 
exactly what form his relapse will as- 
sume. 



ILLUMINATION. 

1 dreamed of a light that should come to we 

From a source I knew not where; 
But a far-off land It nil aure to be, 

Ami I longed to meet It there. 
I dreamed of holding the light up high. 

When It had become mine own; 
And culling to pilgrims passing by 

To worship it where it shone. 

So long I waited mjr eyes grew dim, 

Till at lust I could not see, 
lu my despair 1 looked within. 

l>». the light bed come to me. 
1 cannot call to the pilgrims tho* 

As I once desired to do, 
For I know the light that is sbiulng so, 

Is shining in their hearts too. 

Earle Remington Hints. 



SLIVERS' PANTOMIME COMING ON. 

Ixmis Wesley announces -on behalf of 
Frank Oakley, professionally known as 
Slivers, who is now at the Hippodrome, 
that tWO lata of scenery are in process of 
construction for his forthcoming vaudeville 
debut in pantomime. Two people will l>e 
employed in the offering, including the 
English clown. Mr. Wesley has a well 
known contortionist in mind for the sec- 
ond place in the sketch. 




CLARK AND LA PETITE. 

Another of the Wesley announcements 
is that Alexander Clark and La Petite 
Adelaide will presently be seen together in 
a new sketch under his management. 



MORE YET. 

NeVa Ay mar, who was the prima don- 
na for the Roger Brothers, intends to go 
into the varieties', It has been decided 
that with a good single singing act she 
will win out. 



LOOK OUT, LESTER! 

(ieorgc Cohan has threatened to obtain 
an injunction against Harry 1J. Lester, 
now with the Eight Mascottes, enjoining 
him from giving public performances of 
o copyrighted song used in the production 
of "George Washington, Jr." 



FROM TRAPEZE TO HOSPITAL. 

After working the Saturday matinee 
performance at Keith's last week, Mrs. 
Smith of the Aerial Smiths was removed 
to the hospital where she was found to 
be suffering from appendicitis. Her last 
performance was given without a hitch 
in spite of the suffering she must have 
endured. 



EARL REMINGTON'S BEREAVEMENT. 

Earl Remington J lines is mourning the 
death of her father, which occurred last 
week. The loss will probably still further 
retard her recovery from a nervous break- 
down^ for which she is being treated by 
the hydropathic treatment. 

This means a further delay in the pres- 
entation of the new act, 'The Manicure," 
which will be shown some time this spring. 



GOING ABROAD. 

Fred Niblo and Josephine Cohan will 
>ail for Europe May 19 on a pleasure trip. 
Clifford Fischer sails next Tuesday. 
l'». Obermeyer is also going shortly. 



LISTEN TO THE "CRICKET." 

Florence Saunders, who recently ap- 
peared in a sketch at Hurtig & Seamon's. 
which did not last beyond its initial week. 
i* to be put out in a straight singing act. 



Alter keeping out of vaudeville for two 
years, LaYeen and Cross nre going to re 
turn with a new act, carrying their own 
netting. 






Ml/ > 



VARIETY 



~ 



Grace Von Studdiford. 

Songs. 

Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 

After appearing in Proctor's Newark 
Theatre Miss Von Studdiford comes to 
Twenty-third Street for her first New 
York appearance in vaudeville. With a 
reputation established in comic opera, the 
soprano vocalizes with confidence. The 
three selections given are not sufficient to 
satisfy the house. Miss Von Studdiford 
acknowledges the applause, however, by 
taking curtain calls only. More generosity 
on her part would not be amiss. Miss 
Von Studdiford has proved a drawing card. 

Sime. 



MEW ACT8 OP THE WEEK j 



with more talk about "shop." Mr. Nichol- 
son gives no imitations, but plays the part 
of a seven-dollar-a-week counter jumper 
perfectly straight. Miss Norton has good 
lines of which the most is made. The 
sketch safely made a hit, for it is original 
in construction and conception. Mime. 



V 




Peter F. Dailey. 
Musical Sketch. 
Orpheum. 

Dailey is using a sort of semi-musical 
comedy sketch, lifted in large part from 
"Newport," in which he was seen last 
year. He is supported by six girls, four 
of them ex-members of YVayburn's Min- 
strel Misses. Dailey is a detective em- 
ployed by one Mr. Bankroll to get him out 
of a scrape with a woman. Mrs. Bank- 
roll employs him for the same purpose. 
He recovers the letter — but what's the use 
of talking plot. That detail does not fig- 
ure perceptibly. The backbone of the act 
is the well known style of comedy in 
which Dailey stands unique. The girls 
enter only for one medley of the, coon 
songs Dailey sang during his stay with 
Weber and Fields. They are an even half 
dozen of tiny, dainty girls and they wear 
first short skirts and then the "Dinah" 
pantalettes. The pretty light effects that 
used to add so much to the old time Dailey 
choruses were missing and should be 
brought into play. Miss Brennan, an ex- 
Wayburnian, as Mrs. Bankroll was as 
pretty and graceful as the specifications 
called for. . Rush. 



Polk and Kollins and the Carmen I Sisters. 
Banjoists. \ 

Colonial. M 

The illness of Mme. Renz enables this 
new formation to present itself before a 
New York audience. It was first tried out 
in Utica some five or six weeks ago. Both 
acts are well known. The Carmens in- 
crease the volume of sound but decrease 
the technical average. It is far more showy 
than either of the double acts and makes 
its greater appeal through this. Each of 
the men has a solo and there are two con- 
certed numbers ; the first of these, an oper- 
atic overture, is taken at too fast a tempo. 
The last is the old fashioned style of play- 
ing and makes a good impression for a 
closing number. Chicot. 



\ \ 



Norton and Nicholson. 
"Ella's All Right." 
Pastor's. 

A purely comedy sketch, showing the 
home life of a young married couple who 
are employed in department stores. "The 
flat," consisting of one room containing 
bath, dining room, bedroom, kitchen, and 
parlor, but no wardrobe, is the setting, 
and much legitimate comedy is brought 
out. It is called "a study from life" by 
Miss Norton, and is well conceived. This 
is the first week, and there are unlimited 
opportunities for humorous dialogue that 
■may be developed. The old time jokes in- 
troduced in a burlesque manner could be 
improved by replacing the superfluous talk 



J. Warren Keane ~ — 

Magician. 

Keith's. 

After a long delay Keane is at last able 
to get a showing for his act here in town. 
Among his novelties is the screen used by 
Mine. Herrmann and an original idea in a 
crystal bell that taps out the number of 
pips on a card chosen and answers when 
the proper suit is called. It is first worked 
on a support, but to show that it is not 
connected with any mechanism the bell 
is transferred to the magician's wand and 
is brought down into the audence where it 
answers question! before and after being 
shown. It is clever in its simplicity and 
one of the best minor tricks brought for- 
ward in some time. Keane is one of the 
cleverest of the card palmers and has put 
together an act that is worthy of atten- 
tion both for novelty and deftness of 
work. Chicot. 



'\J 



Capt. Keller's American Zouaves. 

Drill Evolutions. 

Keith's. 

In spite of the "American" these girls 
are mostly English and wear sailor 
suits instead of the zouave dress the bill- 
ing calls for. Four young men are em- 
ployed in the act, which fact the drill mas- 
ter explains by saying that it is so diffi- 
cult to hold his girls that he has occa- 
sionally to impress his sons into service 
until new ones can be trained. At the 
same time it is observed that these young 
men are divided so as to hold the girls in 
line and it is they who do the hardest part 
of the wall scaling with which the act 
closes. They should be dropped out, no 
matter what the cause for their employ- 
ment, for two of them are spotted the 
moment they appear on the stage and the 
others soon make their sex apparent. It 
detracts from the value of the act and 
even though the girls might not do as 
well without them, it would be best to 
make it purely a girl act. As it stands it 
is a bad second to some other turns. 

Chicot. 



,.Ss 



Audrey Kingsbury. 
"The Garden of Melody. 
Keeney's. 

The program particularly mentions 
"staged by Al Holbrook," but that this 
singing sketch needed any staging did not 
become apparent. A back drop, probably 
belonging to the theatre, representing a 
garden and one lonesome swing composed 
the equipment Miss Kingsbury with Oc- 
tavia Broske sang three songs, one a duet. 
Both have soprano voices, Miss Broske's 
being a shade superior, and she presented 
a comely presence in boy's clothes. The 
lonesome swing holding Miss Kingsbury, 
who sang a solo while swaying back and 
forth, propelled by her "assistant," did not 
create the furore expected. For an encore 
a military number was offered, wfth cape 



coats thrown over the costumes. It may 
have been intended for a burlesque, but 
furnished a poor finale. If the title is to 
be carried out, flowers and plants should 
be profusely placed on the stage. Instead 
of a novelty or even a big act, the sketch 
at present simply stands as a fair singing 
turn. Sime. 




Six Proveanies. 

Cyclists. 

Keith's. 

These performers are new in name only, 
for they are a part of the big troupe re- 
cently appearing at the Hippodrome. No 
men are used in the act save an assistant 
who is handy in case of trouble with the 
wheels. Two of the younger girls are 
clever riders and one of them suggests 
Ralph Johnson in the daredevil features 
of her work. She is as agile as a monkey 
and works with a sureness that adds to 
the effect. Some of her work is new and 
she does a great deal to save the act. 
The others are good in the team work and 
the act ranks well up. In the suits worn 
Monday afternoon the color difference be- 
tween the stockings and knickerbockers 
was so marked as to be unpleasant. They 
should have them dyed to match the 
knickers. Chicot. 



\i 



Harris and Beauregarde. 
"The Country Judge." 
Pastor's. 

It is some time since this team has 
made its appearance around the city, and 
this week at Pastor's it appears with a 
girl, the daughter, in the sketch. The 
young woman has a "freak" baritone voice 
of good quality, while Mr. Harris plays a 
farmer without exaggeration. The sketch 
is patterned somewhat after Cressy's 
"Village Lawyer/ 1 and with the girl al- 
lowed another song it would be an enter- 
taining number anywhere. Sime. 



Three Zolars. 

Acrobats. 

Colonial. 



n 



Two men and a woman are employed. 
The woman wears a page's suit and helps 
to the extent of carrying a parasol and 
wrap off the stage and bringing on a tray 
with two cups thereon in the furtherance 
of the idea that the two men are in a 
cafe garden. One of the men makes up as 
a most impossible woman. They perform 
a number of hand to hand tricks which 
have been seen before. It serves well 
enough in its place as the opening number. 
It will not get beyond that at present. 

Chicot. 



\ 



Max Welson Troupe. 
Rope Artists. 
Colonial. 

This troupe offers Spanish ring work, 
employing rope grips instead of metal 
rings. They accomplish a number of 
smart tricks notable for clean cut work, 
neatness of costume and sureness of per- 
formance. Their work does not differ 
markedly from other ring acts of the mus- 
cular sort, but ranks with the best of 
these. Four men are employed, all of 
whom are workers, the act not being 
padded out with apprentices. The final 



trick is one in which one man carried the 
others from the stage, one on a harness, 
the others on his arms, all doing hand 
stands. The best feature of the act is ■ 
nice sense of arrangement in the laying 
out of the group tricks. Chicot. 




Carroll and Baker. 
Singers and Dancers. 
Pastor's. 

One of the team essays the character 
of a Hebrew comedian. Both are good 
dancers, and they dance too well to risk 
comedy. The reception given by the Pas- 
tor audience was cordial, for several new 
dance steps were shown. 



Sime. 



\i 



Williams and Pullman. 
"Are You a Lobster?" 
Pastor's. 

This sketch is believed to be new in the 
sense that another woman is in it. Wil- 
liams can dance. If he did that and that 
alone without a partner, the title might 
be discarded and not be indicative of a re- 
verse state of affairs. Sime. 



OUT OP TOWN 




Eddie Herron and His Show Girls. 
"At the Stage Door." 
Orpheum Theatre, Utica, N. Y. 

One of the brightest offerings seen here 
this season is the act of Eddie Herron 
and his Show Girls in "At the Stage Door," 
a one act musical coined v. The act moves 
with a smoothness that in most cases 
only time gives, and the single appear- 
ance of newness was on a luick drop at 
the rehearsal scene. Herron, the country 
l»oy in the original "Way Down East," 
is a good comedian. In this act he is a 
stage door Johnny who succeeds in getting 
into a theatre while trying to meet a sou- 
brette and is mistaken for the new come- 
dian the company is waiting for. 

Several songs with catchy music are in- 
troduced. The four girls are pretty, neatly 
dressed and dance well. The book and 
lyrics are by Herbert Hall Winslow, music 
by Ernest E. Brace and staged by Jack 
Mason. Sctab. 



1/ 



"In the Swim." 

Novelty Act. 

Trent Theatre, Trenton, N. J. 

Three clever people have put their heads 
together and brought forth one of the best 
girl acts seen in the history of this house. 
Harry Williams of song writing fame 
originated the idea and wrote several 
catchy songs to the tuneful music written 
by Max Hoffman, while Gertrude Hoffman 
has put on the very clever dancing num- 
bers. "In the Swim" consists of six chorus 
men and six prettv girls and also a tramp 
juggler who works closely after the fash- 
ion of W. C. Fields. The act consists of 
several clever singing numbers, a little 
dancing, some good comedy juggling and 
finishes with an original fan effect which 
is supported by the twelve members and 
upon which there is thrown from the bal- 
cony a series of flags of all nations, while 
the entire company sings one of Mr. Wil- 
liams' catchy airs appropriate to the scene. 
The music is all original and written es- 
pecially for this act and the costumes are 
beautiful. While the tramp juggler is 
clever, he is on the stage about four 
minutes too long. Other than this, the act 



VARIETY 



- ... .. . 



could be considered an excellent girl act 
and a novelty which no doubt will make 
the vaudeville patrons in other houses sit 
up and take notice. /. M. W. 




Stanley and Murray. 

"A Little of Everything." 

Gloversville, N. Y. 

This clever duo have an act which 
cannot fail to be a success from the start. 
Miss Burle Murray, late of ''Babes and 
the Baron" company, not only makes a 
first class feeder for -Mr. Stanley, but 
also proves her ability as a soloist by a 
delicious rendition of two numbers. Dur- 
ing the act John Stanley gives a travesty 
on opera which has been done before but 
in a less original manner. He also im- 
personated Eddie Foy and George M. 
Cohan in a way that proves the careful 
*tudy he has made of these two. The act 
is snappy, full of vim and is a go from 
the word. Mil ford M oners. 




Frederick Hawley & Co. 
"The Bandit." 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

This act, originally called 'Held for 
Ransom," made its first appearance in 
a big circuit house at the Orpheum this 
week. It is a thirty-minute chunk out of 
a far Western melodrama. Mr. Hawley 
is Cochise Ramondo, the bandit king; 
Miss Frances Haight is Marie, his captive, 
and H. E. Rowe is Jose Trevenie, body* 
-ervant to Ramondo. Kamondo's band 
has captured Marie and holds her for 
ransom in revenge for injuries done their 
leader by Marie's uncle. There is much 
talk and gunplay tn the act, the finale 
finding Ramondo accidentally killed by 
his servant and Marie on her way to her 
own people again. The ability of the 
trio of players easily overcomes the 
superabundance of dialogue, the gunplay 
makes good with the gallery and with 
four or five minutes cut out of the act it 
promise* to make good all over the house. 
The Orpheum audiences "ate it up" at 
the Sunday opening. Chopin. 



BROTHER AGAINST BROTHER. 

The deep heavy rumbling that Atlan- 
tic City mistook for the brewing of a 
northeast storm early last week it would 
now appear was nothing more than an al- 
tercation on Young's Tier, where Henry 
Myers is holding forth as a vaudeville 
manager. According to the story that came 
to the booking offices hereabouts several 
days after, it happened something like 
this: 

Polk and Collins went to the Myers 
palace of entertainment on what they 
understood to be a net salary. It devel- 
oped upon arrival that certain commis- 
sions were to be deducted therefrom. 
Whereupon there was talk. Then it be- 
came discussion. Discussion grew into 
language, and it ended, so reports a ve- 
racious witness, in a clash of arms in 
which there were no rules and no holds 
barred. 

There's another point about this story, 
but don't let Theodore Kremer hear of it 
or he'll convert it into a play called 
"Brother Against Brother." Henry Myers 
also controls the Doric in Yonkers, while 
B. A. Myers, his brother, books for an op- 
position house in Mount Vernon. Now it 
is reported certain performers have come 
to understand that the acts that play 
Mount Vernon are not wanted in Yonkers. 
And so the bitter battle wages. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 

" The Artists' Forum " It for the artists exclusively. Any lust complaint any artist may 
have or considers ha has will ba printed In this department. Or any comment that an artist 
may desire to make. 

Also any artist or act that disagrees with a reviewer on Variety In his review of the artist's 
work or act may have his criticism of the criticism printed in this column, and it will be 
nswered by the reviewer. 

Confine your letters to 150 words and write on one side of paper only. 



New York, March 15. 
Editor Variety. 

Sir:— Your articles in Variety on "Why 
Artists Should Organize" remind me of 
the difficulty of showing a new act under 
the present system. 

I invested over $2,000 last summer in a 
new act, and when I tried to get an open- 
ing to show it was informed that I might 
get a hearing at a burlesque house for a 
consideration. The consideration being 
$HX> and the theatre not having the facili- 
ties to properly stage the act, I concluded 
to put it in storage, where it has remained. 
1 cannot see my way clear to invest such 
an amount and then pay for the privilege 
of working it. 

Vaudeville is all right, but the system is 
evidently wrong. The cry for new acts 
cannot be sincere, as artists with the abil- 
ity and means get no encouragement to 
get up a new act, as without a "pull" it 
cannot get work, and those with a pull 
don't need a new act, so what's the use? 

Artist. 



Company, and now with the Empire 
Musical Four. Mr. Dunn holds the cham- 
pionship of Kentucky and has tried to lo- 
cate Montgomery for over two months. 

We will place a forfeit with any one he 
names and at any time and for any 
amount over $100. 

Hoping you may be able to help us 1 am. 

Arthur Wainwright 

12 East 23d St., New York, N. Y. 



New York, March 14. 
Editor Variety. 

Sir: — I have been a constant reader of 
your paper Variety and see its fast grow- 
ing popularity in the profession. 

I would like to place a challenge through 
yoiir columns for a match on the harmon- 
ica with Marshall Montgomery, "champion 
harmonica player of America," for his 
title. I am speaking for George Dunn, 
many years with the Jolly Grass Widows 



I In the February 10 issue of Variety in 
this column appeared a letter signed "Mar 
tin W. Fox," commenting upon a proposed 
testimonial to John If. Amnions, the man- 
ager of a circuit of theatres in Indiana, 
on the occasion of his birthday. Mr. Fox 
at the time was correspondent for this 
paper at Frankfort, Ind. The letter ridi- 
culed the manner in which the subscrip- 
tion for the testimonial was being raised, 
and having come from an accredited corre- 
spondent, it was published. On informa- 
tion furnished us later in the matter Mr. 
Fox's connection with Variety was severed. 
Under date of March 10 Variety is in 
receipt of a communication from Mr. Am- 
nions, too lengthy to print, wherein he de- 
nies all statements made by Mr. Fox, 
adding that the Fox letter was actuated 
by a personal grudge. That he (Am- 
nions) had no knowledge of the birthday 
present (diamond pin) until it was re- 
ceived, and his standing in the theatrical 
profession does not allow any person 
knowing him to place any credence in the 
Fox letter.— Ed. 1 



MORRIS WELL SATISFIED. 

J. H. Morris claims passing attention 
long enough to observe that his theatres 
in Gloversville, N. Y., and Frankford, Pa., 
are doing nicely, thank you, and that he 
is prepared to extend his holdings in two 
other cities in the East, exact locations 
not being disclosed. 



BUTTERFIELD IN JACKSON. 

W. S. Butterfield has closed a deal for 
a new $2."),000 theatre in Jackson, Mich. 
The house will have a seating capacity of 
one thousand and will be devoted to vaude- 
ville. It is expected that it will be read} 
to open by September. 

ANOTHER TREASURER'S BENEFIT. 

Joe Smith, treasurer of Miner's Bowery 
Theatre, will take a benefit Sunday even- 
ing, April 15. A large number of tickets 
have already been sold, "Skinny," the mas- 
todon head usher, having charge of that de- 
partment. 



STUNG AGAIN. 

Although but a very slight strain is 
put upon the child and her work is clearly 
within the exemptions of the Gerry so- 
ciety, Ida Marcereau was taken out of the 
Fred Walton production at the Fifty- 
eighth street this week. Will Archer was 
put in and again the Gerry man came 
around only to meet the old familiar re- 
frain of "see my eldest son about it." 11 
the Gerry Society ever get Archer properly 
classified it is going to be a severe blow 
to the press agents. 



WILL DO DUTCH IF— 

Jess Dandy says that in spite of many 
absurdly large offers from vaudeville man 
agers, it is not his intention to play vaude 
ville dates if he can help it. In case he 
does decide to go in he will offer Dutch 
instead of Hebrew comedy. 



DAVIS CROSSES WATER. 

Harry Davis announces he has purchased 
a location in Allegheny for a theatre and 
will go ahead with the erection of the 
building at once. The theatre he says 
"will be ornate, commodious and will 
offer high class vaudeville attractions." It 
will be ready for the opening of next. 
season. 



KEITH WANTS HIM. 

One of the Keith people has been try- 
ing to induce the treasurer at the Trent 
Theatre, Trenton, to give up his job and 
take a similar position at the Keith house 
in Syracuse. There will be no change in 
Trenton for all of that. 

WHAT IT IS. 

That bulge in Henry Myers' right hand 
breast pocket is a blue print of the plans 
of a new house in Atlantic City. 



CORKS ON ORGANIZATION. 

Smiles that won't come off were on the 
face of the Human Corkscrew as he took 
his accustomed place at the table and made 
the high thirst sign, for word had gone 
forth that the bock was ripe. 

"I had a chuckle," he announced as he 
set down the empty seidl and drew imagi- 
nary ditto marks on the table. "I got one 
of those Varietys where they asked the 
actors to come on in and talk about or- 
ganization. 

"That was three or four weeks ago and 
there ain't been a letter from an actor yet. 
Huh? No. It's not because they don't 
want to, it's because they're scared. 

"You perambulate some and you'll hear 
enough hot air in a day to fill all the gas 
tanks in the country and help heat hell be- 
side*, but that's on the sidewalk; not in 
print. 

"There's about five hundred actors what 
would rather talk ahout that than eat, 
but every dod gasted one of 'em is so 
scared for fear Alhee'll see his letter and 
not book him or that Hill Morris'll get 
mad that he has to tie his hands behind 
his back for fear he might get the nerve 
somehow to speak up. 

''It ain't because they don't want it. 
It's because thev want the other fellow to 
do the work that they're holding back, and 
I'll bet they'll still be holding back when 
the smash comes, and instead of telling 
what they want for a salary they will have 
to hold their hats in their hands while 
they ask the agent what the manager is 
willing to give. 

"It takes a man like George Fuller 
Golden, who gets so darn mad he don't 
(are what happens, to make the first 
break. Then thev flock around and tell 
how they did it all. 

"I'll bet you the seidls that the first man 
to come out and say he's willing to start 
something will have the whole crowd going 
as soon as they see he knows what he's 
about, but they are all waiting 'round to 
>ee who's going to make the first break 
because they're scared to make a jump 
themselves. 

'"I don't care a whole lot, myself, what 
happens, but all the same I like to act 
sometimes and I'd be working for Bob 
Grau exclusive if I spoke up big, and there 
ain't much profit in that sort of an en- 
gagement. 

"I know darn well that I'll never be a 
big man because they don't appreciate real 
art in this country and I can't put a 
slapstick in the act because it's too hard 
on my real Eve with only a picture suit 
on. if there was an organization we 
eould get some work. Now they won't 
even come to see me. You fellows was 
the only ones to have a look and you 
laughed so much that I was ashamed of 
you," and Corks drowned the remembrance 
in the seidl thoughtfully passed him by 
the head of the table. //. W. 8. 



MEERS WILL GO HOME 

At the expiration <»f his present hook 
iligs Alfred Meers will return to Eng 
land for the purpose of building and per- 
fecting a new single comedy act. Meers 
declares that il is so much easier to gain 
openings for a new act across the pond 
that it will more th.in repay the cost of 
the trip 

Sam Collins has been booker] for eigh 
teen weeks over the Orpheutri Circuit, 
opening in April. 



-^ 






8 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Sime 



PASTOR'S. 

The main feature on Fourteenth street 
this week is the forty-fust managerial an- 
niveraary of Mr. Pastor. After that, 
nothing matters, although a bill is pre- 
sented at Pastor's Theatre that pleases 
each audience. 

Four numbers appearing are listed under 
New Aets, including Norton and Nicholson, 
unque s tionably the hit of this week's hill, 
while of the others Leona Thurber and 
her pickaninnies run a close second. There 
seems to be a new colored youngster in 
the bunch and the act was well liked. 

The Americus Comedy Four, Mons. Ell- 
wood and company and Rice and Elmer 
also occupied prominent positions on the 
program. 

Potter and Hartwell in head balancing 
have a couple of new tricks, the girl of 
the team proving herself an acrobat of 
no mean ability, while the man is a con- 
tortionist who forces himself through a 
barrel which does not appear large enough 
at the openings to admit of that being 
accomplished. The act is well set up, 
likewise dressed. 

Willie Gardner on roller and ice skates 
did some dancing, having the wheel skates 
especially under complete control. The 
work on the pedestal was liked, and with 
more room and a showy setting Mr. Gard- 
ner would have his act appearing as much 
larger. 

John Zimmer is juggling hats and balls 
the same as ever, but loses confidence if 
a slip occurs, others following rapidly. 

St. John and Le Fevre gave their songs 
and dances and the man has difficulty in 
keeping regular time, changing at his 
own pleasure. The girl believes she is 
an imitator and probably is under the 
impression that "mugging" earns her that 
distinction. 

John and Mamie Conroy are a corking 
dancing team, and it only needs Mr. Con- 
roy to realize that his comedy makeup as 
well as the talk are holding them back 
from taking rank with any similar couple. 



KEENEY'S. 

Brooklynites are at least loyal, and 
with Sue Smith, the singing flower girl, 
at Keeney's this week her friends are 
out en masse to attest her popularity 
among the populace of her native town. 
Not content to silently listen to Miss 
Smith's vocal efforts, three helped out on 
the songs from a box. Miss Smith showed 
'em what vaudeville will do. She dis- 
played thirteen diamond ornaments be- 
sides a pearl necklace, and wore the 
dressiest of dresses, so dressy that she 
was overdressed, and it added twenty 
years to her looks. Her soprano voice, 
somewhat above the ordinary, seemed to 
delight the audience, for Sue sang five 
songs, one selection having passed the age 
limit of popularity. 

George W. Hay in blackface has changed 
his talk and songs around considerably. 
The potter is somewhat improved but 
Day hurts himself by being the first 
to frankly and' brutally mention the pos- 
sible results of the I.ongworth Roosevelt 
wedding. 

Swift and Buckley deserve credit for 
having the ability to '"lake" more music 
out of their instruments than would seem 
possible. The audience is deceived by the 



pretense at comedy. Both work in black 
face, but one could appear in his natural 
color. The cork helps to hide the blushes 
of the "comedian" for the stuff given 
out, about the worst of which is the milk 
bottle. That does not smack of humor, 
hut of idiocy. 

Kellv and Kent seem assured of encores 

■ 

on the tough finish of the singing and 
dancing sketch they appear in. Kelly 
attends to the songs and dances while 
Miss Kent pleases the house with her 
Bowery girl. 

Tod Sloan with his monologue (and Tod 
Sloan) fared reasonably well. His stories 
were laughed at and he received two calls. 
While not a howling success, he is far 
from being termed the yellow skinned 
variety of fruit — at a proper price. 

Wise and Melton opened the bill with 
seine evening dress clothes. Evidently 
they are uninformed that opera hats do not 
top tuxedo coats in the ultra fashionable 
tvi. The boys dance well, following the 
style of the Reiff Brothers, but sing two 
songs, one too many. Both are clean look- 
ing, but apt to smile when applause is re- 
(i ived. 

Mazuz and Ma/.ette just beat the pic- 
tures out in closing the show. 



CIRCLE. 

Harrv Brvant has given "Scottv, the 
Cowboy." the opening piece of his bur- 
lesque show, a melodrama setting, and the 
sketch resembles a well burlesqued act cut 
out of one of the Third Avenue "thrillers." 

It may be a trifle too legitimate for the 
regulars who long for the slapstick, but it 
passes thirty minutes rapidly. 

No favoritism is shown, nor does Bryant 
himself (who appears in it) "hog" the 
comedy. There is a "villainous" quintet, 
sufficient to scare the audience, with the 
leader, William Bush, as "Rattles the Kid- 
napper," giving a weak impersonation of an 
ice cream salesman instead of adding the 
necessary touch of grotesque rowdyism to 
the character. 

George Wilson, Walter Terry and Wil- 
liam Wells have sj>eaking parts which 
Speak for themselves, and Bryant is the 
pst'udo "Scotty" in the guise of a tramp 
who joins the band, saving the girl from 
the railroad train by allowing it to run 
under the bridge he forms. 

Gladys Sparkle is the girl, played 
by Edith Bryant, and Florence Cnsmore 
is Mile. Oldham. That may be inten- 
tional on the part of the program man. 

The girls are kept on the jump and have 
four changes, the stockings not agreeing 
as to color in any. They work well to- 
gether, which is the most notieeable 
feature of the entire crowd. 

Darmody, a club swinger, opens the olio 
with some very simple juggling, and Terry 
and Elmer follow in a sketch. Four of the 
girls are used as pupils in a dancing 
school, and Terry does well enough until 
he slaps one of the young women where 
he hadn't ought to. That is "raw" and 
was probably ordered cut by the house 
manager after the first performance. 

The Vorke Comedy Four have too many 
comedians, with singing not acceptable 
enough to stand off the efforts of the trio. 
Ih«- Hebrew impersonator overworks him 
self and the voices do not blend well. 

George X. Wilson is the center of one 



of those dreary German affairs, with no 
head or tail, and missing the German 
dialect. Miss Camille De Monville is a 
part of the sketch, which has a rather fair 
finish through some good "business" intro- 
duced in connection with the chorus of a 



song. 



The Bush-Devere trio introduce illus- 
trated pictures with both singing and the 
brasses, giving the usual patriotic finale. 
The pictures are poor, much more so than 
the music, and if more attention were 
given the slides or appropriate moving 
films used instead, something might be 
made of it. 

"Stella's Reception" is the concluding 
number, but rather than have the good 
impression left by the opening ruined it 
was passed up. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

A heavy bill of names is offered at 
Proctor's Twentv-third Street this week. 
Grace Von Studdiford (under New Acts) 
tops it, with dames J. Corbett — almost 
equally featured following close, both on 
the program and in the applause received. 

Corbett is worshiped by the upper part 
of the house and in his latest sketch, "A 
Thief in the Night," attempts serious act- 
ing as a light comedian. James J. has 
still to overcome a certain ungainly grace 
which marks his efforts, but that is par- 
tially hidden by the excellent performance 
of Miss Tully as a trained nurse. There 
are three other characters listed on the 
program, and they do not get much beyond 
that. 

Josephine Cohan and Company in "Fri- 
day, the l.'Uh," present the sketch played 
throughout the season, and for which five 
persons are credited as responsible. Had 
one only attempted the job of turning out 
this misfit, something tangible might have 
resulted. 

For pure laughter Charles F. Semon, 
opening the second half, is entitled to the 
blue ribbon. There is a personal magnet- 
ism about Semon that brings him into the 
audience, and everything he offered was 
greeted with uproarious applause. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Crane in "A 
Yankee's Love for Dixie" gave a war play- 
let by Ruth Mitchell with just sufficient 
pathos, melodrama and comedy inter- 
twined to hold the interest. It is quite the 
be.-t sketch of its kind shown this season. 
Mrs. Crane, as a Confederate sympathizer, 
has acquired the broad, soft, Southern 
twang, adding that charm to her well 
played part, and Mr. Crane gives a heroic 
touch to the Northern army captain. The 
small character bit of Christine Hill, as a 
colored Auntie, is made prominent through 
brevity, and the miniature war drama 
pleased immensely. 

Vet tie Vesta in songs was a pleasing 
picture on the stage, singing her selections 
in the early part. 

The Sisters Macarte gave their dis- 
jointed performance and Black and Jones, 
colored, cling to two old stories in prefer- 
ence to something of later date to fit in 
with their songs and dancing, the latter 
having improved lately. 

Fred Niblo and Vinella's Horses filled 
out the program 

Manager Butt of the Palace, London, 
Kngland, came to town this week. 



THE OFFICE BOY ON ACTORS. 

The Office Boy had such a large smile 
spread over his face that his head looked 
like a hole in the wall when I dropped into 
the agent's office. 

"Gee, say!" remarked the Boy, "wait a 
minute till 1 pull myself together and 
111 let you in on this laugh. 

"We just had in one of those actor 
boys, the 'legits.' You know. They're a 
scream to me. This guy asked me 1 what 
I thought of his chances in vaudeville (he 
said 'vood-e-ville'), and after I looked the 
lobster over I commenced to snicker, and 
can't get over it. 

"It's a joke, anyway, how the hams that 
can't make good anywhere thinks it's a 
walkover in vaudeville, the hardest place 
to make good in. They walk the streets 
touching friends, and do everything to 
'keep out of vaudeville' according to them 
>elves, and when they come in the agent'* 
office the first crack out of the box is: 
'Well, I ought to get about $f>00. I heard 
So-and-So got almost as much as that.' 
Why, they think they can con a man who 
knows into l»elieving that this same fellow, 
who bragged about the seventy five he was 
getting in a company that closed the first 
week, after rehearsing for six. is a stun 
ner. 

"Few of these legitimates are any good 
for vaudeville anyway. They are all right 
maybe to fill in a minor rede in a play, 
but this bluff about vaudeville hurting 
their reputations after they have carried 
a list of agents around for a month makes 
me dizzy. 

"One thing the Wisenheimer is dead 
sure of. That a vaudeville audience is 
only a part of an idiot asylum, and the 
idea of paying over $35 for a sketch is 
ridiculous. If he i> a legitimate comedian 
he says to himself: 'Well, I'll hand 'cm 
that stuff I pulled on the Lambs Club and 
they'll never stop laughing.' 

"He gives it, and they laugh, but he 
doesn't know enough to know why he 
can't get any more engagements after the 
first week. 

"The same with the emotional actress 
and the ingenue. Say, but I'm stuck on 
that word 'ingenue.' It's right to me. 
Have you seen many of the actresses who 
try vaudeville? They never know what 
acting is until they are back in the hall 
room front thinking it over. 

"These legitimates are a bunch of four 
Aushers, both in acting and talk. By the 
time they will know enough to come into 
vaudeville as they should, vaudeville will 
have no need or use for them. It has art 
i*ts who have got the actors skinned a 

mile." Sime. 

DIDN'T GET THE HOUSE. 

There i.- a curious bit of historv re 
garding the lease of the Imperial Theatre 
in Brooklyn to W. T. drover that has 
not vet seen the light. 

When it was understood that G rover 
wanted the house i'ercv Williams made 
the suggestion of Hyde & Bchman that 
owing to the small rental it might be 
profitable to those managers and himself 
to lease the house and keep its doors 
closed. 

The G rover political pull seemed to be 
in better working order than the others, 
and there was no opportunity to test the 
merits of fhe idea. 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



— — — ■ 



By Chicot 



COLONIAL. 

Three new acts on the bill are to be 
found under that classification. Of the 
others the hit was the Hag girls of Frank 
D. In van, a number first serving in bur- 
lesque but which bears none of the ear- 
marks of that class of performance. The 
girls are trim in outline and quite the best 
formed lot seen in a girl act this season. 
The flag idea is novel but there is a de- 
< ided lack of invention iri"fHe"UgllW march- 
ing. The girls have been taught two 
marches, one for each song, and they re- 
peat these simple figures for each verse. 
The effect becomes tiresome. Bryan's own 
work is good. As a quick changer he 
shows skill and he has an act running 
over with "kind applause" features with- 
out tiring. Charles E. Evans and his as- 
sociate players scored strongly with "It's 
Up to You, William." It is an act that 
scores because of its lines and it is well 
played throughout. Macart's Monkeys 
formed another good feature. One of the 
comedian monkevs does his best to break 
ii p the show. Once he was rather clever 
in his interruptions, but like some of his 
human fellows he is overplaying a good 
idea and should be curbed. There are 
plenty of good ideas in the act, the bell 
ringing being the best. The barber shop 
i< so poorly done that it should be left out 
until further developed. Kelly and Vio- 
let te have their singing specialty and 
made good with the audience. Miss Vio- 
let te is showing some handsome gowns 
but seems to feel that this is all she is 
railed upon to do. The act was better 
when they sang more. Mr. Kelly should 
leave the advertising of one of his songs 
to its publishers. Violet Dale has her imi- 
tations, of which her Templeton is good 
and the rest not so much so. She woifld 
do better as a singer of sprightly songs 
than as an imitator. The Orpheus Com- 
edy Four work hard and to good effect. 
They are carrying a special drop with a 
tableau frame for one of the songs and in 
other ways evince their enterprise. Now 
t hey should make further improvement by 
causing the Buster Brown to keep his 
trousers down to the knee. He seems to 
feel that he is favoring the audience by 
making them into trunks. His legs are 
not in the Frankie Bailey class and he 
should be taken over into a corner and 
talked to. It is a blot on an otherwise 
good act. There is a very short and 
stingy motion picture this week. It dis- 
proves the adage that the best goods come 
in the smallest packages. 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

Henri de Vries holds over for a second 
week at Hanimerstein\s and is making a 
real hit. Here, if anywhere, he might be 
expected to fail to score, for the llammer- 
stein patron has been trained to the light 
and frothy specialties and girl acts. None 
the less the sombre t rayed v of "A Case 
of Arson" held the attention and it was 
noteworthy that while his earlier changes 
were applauded, the audience became so 
interested as the case progressed that the 
scene in which John A rend confesses his 
crime was played with no applause at the 
finish, the audience being too absorbed in 
the play. It is a splendid piece of detail 
acting Mr. de Vries does in this scene, 
simple, tense and convincing. It Ikis no 



appeal of noise but scores through sheer 
sincerity. Rostow, who used to be called 
Sadi Alfarabi, does capital hand balancing 
and teaches native acts a lesson they will 
not learn through the equipment he em- 
ploys. Everything he uses is bright and 
dean and dresses the stage. The Rappo 
Sisters do several Russian dances but do 
not repeat their remarkable performance 
of half a dozen years ago at Koster & 
Bial's. They have a snappiness of work 
t hat is French rather than Russian. 
George Fuller Golden was one of the real 
hits of the bill. He changed his last offer- 
ing a trille to get more points out of the 
fact that he is on the same bill with De 
Vries and made more of a hit through 
t hat. He has the best monologue offering 
he ever had, though less intensity and 
a little more burlesque in his protean act 
would increase the effect of that portion 
of his performance. Ward and Curran 
presented "The Terrible .Judge" to the 
usual good effect and Marguerite and Han- 
1< y showed some good work. The Bard 
Hi others offered their excellent acrobatic 
work. This is one act that proves that 
Americans are able to do as good acrobatic 
work as the imported turn if only the 
same attention be given to detail. In 
dressing, formation and tricks they take 
a back seat to none of the visitors from 
the other side of the water and they stand 
repeat engagements better than most, since 
t hey are always welcome. Frank Lynn 
moved up here from Proctor's. He has 
changed one song to good effect but he 
should cut out that appeal in which he 
expresses the wish that he may be able 
to go home and tell his friends that Ameri- 
cans can appreciate British humor. The 
trouble is that many of his jokes were 
worn out here before they were taken 
across the pond. The Two Pucks please 
when they sing and dance but even a 
matinee audience cannot laugh at the 
boy's monologue. The jokes should be cut 
out. The children do some clever work 
but in monologue the youngster is becom- 
ing rutted in a bad style and if he con- 
tinues will not be able to handle joke 
material when his maturer years might 
enable him to do so. There are pictures 
as usual. 



KEITH'S. 



Rather better than usual is the bill at 
Keith's this week. There is novelty in 
spots and except for two song acts in a 
rear end collision the turns are well laid 
out. The 1'roveanies and Keller's Ameri- 
can Zouaves are new here, the rest are 
mostly familiar, though J. Warren Keane 
<»llers a new program and is also found 
under the New Acts classification. One of 
the hits of the bill was Bobby North in 

his Hebrew monologue. North is apt t<> 
depart from his dialect at times when 
Ire grows excited about the point of a joke, 
but his monologue is good and possessed 
of philosophy as well as humor. Hi- 
parody rings in operatic airs in place of 
the popular songs and is as good as his 
talk. They made him come back after the 
next number had been posted. The Dillon 
Brothers were more willing and sang 
straight through their music books. They 
have too many songs with a trick refrain 
to preserve proportions, but the airs are 
all catchy and ^vwn or eight had to be 



sung before they could get away. They 
have a quiet but effective delivery and 
deserve to score. Emmet Devoy and com- 
pany have worked out "The Saintly Mr. 
Hillings'' into a lively sketch of action 
and pleased with it; the honors going to 
a small negro child used in the finish. A. 
\V. Asia showed his billiard table work 
and the Harmony Four paid more atten- 
tion to their comedy than they did to 
their music and with better results. Car- 
ter and Bluford had their international 
songs but were placed too far down on 
the bill and could not come up to what 
the audience expected at that hour. They 
still carry two sets of scenery one of 
which is very unnecessary. "Senator" 
Frank Bell sang one song and delivered a 
short stump speech of the old fashioned 
sort. He had the good sense to make his 
act short and refuse an encore that was 
sincere, with the result that he did not 
tire as his stuff would have done had it 
been longer. Brazil and Brazil did some 
acrobatic work that was fair and seemed 
to find it necessary to put in a sketch. 
They are more clever with their tricks 
than as performers and they would do 
well to leave the acting end alone. Mur- 
phy and Andrews have some very old 
jokes and wind up with a medley of grand 
operatic airs with words that would shock 
the original composers. They kick the 
poor old Miserere, now that it is down, 
and drag it from the rest that kind friends 
seek to secure for it. The Miserere is only 
good for parodies now. If they could get 
their dialogue up to the standard of their 
parody thev would he better than thev 
are. The Sawadas are Japanese, four in 
number, two of them being youngsters 
who are merely exhibited without being 
compelled to work. There is a little com- 
monplace juggling and some pedal work, 
the woman doing the latter. 



HURTIG & SEAMON'S. 

May Holey and her girls find the top 
place at the uptown house this week, 
though the Zancigs hold over and are one 
of the talked of features. The best thing 
about the Zancigs' work is that they (lif- 
ter from all others in sending a wider 
range of objects. Instead of confining 
their list to a couple of hundred familiar 
possessions they send names, dates and 
numbers as rapidly and without any ap- 
parent signaling. This enables them to 
run the act to the full time limit and 
hold the interest to the last. Miss Boley 
has an excellent offering. The girls who 
work with her are personable and clever, 
the act i> diversified and Miss Boley her- 
-elf as the cut-up has the sort of thing 
vaudeville wants. 

Howard and Howard are rather new and 
are almost clever. One of the men does 
Hebrew comedy as a messenger boy and 
.with a little more care in his characteriza- 
tion would have a new type the younger 
Hebrew. Hallback and Parquet te are 

a couple of negroes who have a very 
limited idea of coined v and vet essav it. 
Thev do little dancing and the offering is 
badly put together. The Smedley Arthur 
sketch club is made one of the features, 
The Smedley youngsters will be out of 
the Fauntleroy class very noon and should 
he giving thought to a new offering to re 
place this. Their deepening voices belie 
their golden curls and their height is an- 



other bar. They take the usual number of 
encores but cannot continue to hold out 
much longer. Tom Hearu had them howl- 
ing with lii.s work, although crockery 
breakage is no new idea. His personality 
gains the laughs rather than his tricks, 
though his physical culture ideas are good 
and one or two are more than ordinarily 
clever. Loui.se Brehany shows poor taste 
in the selection of her songs and sings 
such as she has without brilliancy. She 
seems to take no interest in her work and 
this, combined with a rather cold per- 
sonality, militates against her. 

Deltorelli and Glissando have the same 
old ideas that have served so long. To those 
who have not seen them before the ideas 
are clever, but there are few in any audi- 
ence to whom their work is not familiar. 
Their best trick is playing the sleigh 
bells with their feet while they lie on their 
backs upon tables and hold newspapers 
between their eyes and the bells. 



FIFTY-EIGHTH STREET. 

Fred Walton is the headliner at Proc- 
tor's house on Fifty-eighth street and busi- 
ness has been big this week. Walton's 
comedy is of a sort to appeal to all floors. 
There is a wide range from the slapstick to 
the best of his work, but it is all good and 
most of it impresses the gallery as well as 
the orchestra patrons. Will Archer replaces 
the child used in the act surprisingly well 
and many accepted the girl's name on the 
program without question. The most 
noticeable difference was the alarming way 
the bed sagged when "Cissy" was tucked 
in. Mr. Walton's is an act that one may 
witness often and not tire of. Higo was 
one of the features, but was a bigger name 
on the program than on the stage. 

Wilfrid Clarke and his clever players 
scored their usual whirlwind hit with 
• What Will Happen Next?" and were one 
of the leaders in point of favor. Stuart 
Barnes won the house with some of his 
old jokes, but still sings a song that never 
was a good one even when it was new six 
or ei^ht months ago. He usually has a 
nice taste in songs. The Dollar Troupe did 
some acrobatics for n closing number and 
the Italian trio played favorites, giving the 
intermezzo from "Cavalleria" and "The 
Palms." The intermezzo was beautifully 
sung, hut later they strained slightly after 
effects and lost some of their skill, though 
tiny did not shriek as badly as most who 
do operatic numbers. Prclle's dogs were a 
good matinee feature, but did not get the 
night houses strongly until after the open- 
ing. The riders gained the first real Inugh. 
and after that the net made up lost 
ground. \llie Gilbert and her Summer 
Girls are doing better as regards the girls, 
but Miss Gilbert is apparently suffering 
from a cold, and her singing is an inflie- 
tioti. She should let the girls do the 
singing until such time as her own voice 
does not annoy the audience. She should 
change her songs if she desires to score n 
real hit. This is the present bail feature 
of the act. Tlie Heltons do a hand-bal- 
ancing act that would carry more weight 
did they cut out most of the comedy, 
none of which is of a vcrv high class. 



l.i ii" - E IMiinkett, the vaudeville 
ngerit. will put "Panhandle Pete" on the 
road next Reason with a well known 
vaudc\iH< comedian in the title role. 



10 



VARIETY. 



Shows of the Week 



By Rush 



ORPHEUM. 

The Kilties Kami bonds an unusually 

expensive bill here this week. M follows 

tin- intermission and holds the stage for 

what appeared to be close t<» an hour. The 

stirring Scotch bonier ballads were en- 
thusiast ieally received but there was a 
jarring incongruity in the appearance of 
the stalwart companx in their highland 
uniforms playing the popular jingles that 
are being whistled by all the New York 
office boys. The band closes with the 
national anthem. Tuesday night the 
audience executed the manoeuvre s.» un- 
common to American bouses of standing 
until the end. Earlier on the program 
a male person of vague musical ear and 
education paid the same solitary tribute 
to "Auld Lang Syne,"' an effective bit «»t 
comedy that the manager of the Kilties 
might grab off as a permanency. 

Edmund Day and Company have a good 
dramatic playlet in "The Sheriff.' 1 There 
are some inconsistencies, but sufficient 
things of interest happen to make it en- 
tertaining. As the Arizona sheriff Mr. 
Day has provided himself with some 
native Western humor. Also he roils a 
cigarette with one hand and in all thing* 
shows close attention to detail. 

Rice and Prevost have put a new com 
edy stunt or two in their turn. The new 
business is in the vein of the rest of the 
turn and funny enough to stay. 

Eddie Mack's noveltx dancing is really 
novel. His clog shoe exposition of a base* 
ball game is extremely entertaining. The 
Milani Trio look the street minstrels and 
their music, instrumental and vocal, makes 
good hearing. , 

Mayme Remington followed the Kilties. 
The chocolate kiddies fixed up as a bur- 
lesque band scored at the go off. 

Melville Ellis did well to apologize for 
his voice, but there was nothing else in 
his single turn at the piano that called 
for apology. His playing was brilliant in 
his straightaway numbers and the polite 
conversation with musical accompaniment 
of a gossiping woman was clean cut and 
laughable. One number he called a musi- 
cal omelet, a composite of five well 
known selections from opera mixed up 
with ragtime and popular songs. 

The Globe of Death didn't thrill Tues- 
day evening because the motor cycle was 
out of sorts and refused to chug-chug. 
Mr. Clark was compelled to bow his apol 
ogies and retire. But the audience had 
a look at the formidable apparatus of the 
act and took its thrill on faith. 

Peter Dailey closed the first hall with 
his Dinah < 1 iris act, which will be found 
reviewed elsewhere. 



GOTHAM. 

Adelaide Herrmann is featured in East 
New York this week as "Cleopatra, the 
Egyptian Sorceress," which max he in 
tended as an indication of the period of 
world history from which inosl of her 

Sf 

magic comes. All of Mrs. Herrmann's il 
lusioris arc old, but she has secured a con 
siderable degree of skill in her sleight of 
hand work. Her mechanical tricks go 
smoothly and except that thev lack 
novelty are calculated to entertain any 
but the wise audiences. The Herrmann 
name aids her as n vaudeville attraction. 
Ned N\e comes iii for the next si/e of 



display type. He has four Rollicking 
t .ills and the Retd Sisters with him, the 
turn being a girl act of the usual sort. 
The rollicking girls are rather heavy for 
the purpose of the skit, but they sing 
HOmewhal better than the average run of 
vaudeville choruses. The Reid Sisters 
have a lively acrobatic dance, but at the 
end of the turn reappear in the costumes 
they wore at the opening. Nye affects 
the slow and stately humor of the late 
Dan Daly, also sings in imitation of Daly's 
\oiee. The impersonation is fairly faith 
I ul and Nye resembles Daly in appearance. 
Altogether the act is one of merit, with 
motion, music ami color enough to make 
it entertaining. The besi thing the girls 
do is a swing song. 

The man of Katie Rooney and comp:ui\ 

* s * 

has a Buster Brown costume not conspic- 
uously funny, lb- needs some new music. 
This also applies to Miss Rooney. Some 
new musical numbers would help her a lot. 
Her work i* clever. 

Emerson and Omega have a broad bur- 
lesque sketch with German dialect accom- 
paniments, just the sort of thing the 
Gotham audience-; want. 

Cook and Madison's early talk i> funny 
and the burlesque sharpshooting won a 
continuous performance laugh. Harrx 
Madison injured his hand Wednesday night 
and the tumbling had to be cut out. 

Aldo and Amour in comedy bar work 
are good enough in their acrobatics but 
their attempts at comedy occupy too 
much time. They might retain the knock- 
about stunts, eliminating much of the rest. 

Mark Sullivan Offered a bunch of songs 
and impersonations, which might be rated 
a. little better than fair. 

The Majestic Trio of negro singers was 
funny in places, but a sentimental bal- 
lad is used which unintentionally borders 
uii the burlesque. A good coon song would 
l.e better. The two men do a comical bit 
of business with a roll of stage monev 
that suggests something of Williams and 
Walker. New material would probably 
help the turn. 



AMPHION. 

the Six Ulinserettis and Edna Aug in a 

partly new singing and dancing sketch 

are the features of Mr. Grover's Williams 

burg house this week. The acrobats have 

;• brilliant specialty, having developed the 

turn over from the bounding mat ending 
in the two and three high position to 
a degree closely approaching perfection. 
the work of the men is sensational, but 
they- injure their otTering by wearing 
la \ender costumes which clash violentlv 
in color with the crimson of their para- 
phernalia. 

K&telle Wordette and company's farce 
-ketch "A Honeymoon in the Catskills" is 
funny in a vein of broad comedy, the 
points <>f which were effective even with 
Monday's blizzard frozen audience. 

The juggling of Huston and Dallas and 
the surrounding of their act have a Euro- 
pean flavor. The work of the pair is 
-mouth but not very pretentious. The 
comedy is effective at all times, and ap- 
pear-, to have been worked up with con- 
siderable study. 

Raymond and Cavcrlv call their act 
'•Twiddle Twaddle" in a plain effort to 
imitate 'he Woberfleldian style. The iniita 



tion is weak, however, and the act does 
not rise above the average of a sidewslk 
German comedy. 

Miss Aug goes back to the scrubwoman 
act w hich has been familiar for several 
years. The songs she uses in the early 
part of her turn are well done, but rather 
too familiar to attract great attention. 
There is too much talk interpolated. Miss 
Aug is an exceedingly clever comedienne, 
and such trilling defects as appear in her 
offering could easily be remedied by judi- 
cious editing and a substitution here and 
t here. 

George Felix of Felix. Harry and Barry 
might improve his comedy acrobatics 
by making absolutely no sound be- 
tween his entrance and his first spoken 
line, This bit of business is one of the 
best features of the turn and its develop- 
ment would well repay careful thought. 

Cabaret's dogs were placed early on the 
bill, but for a dog act won its proper 
share of Williamsburg's approval. John- 
ny Johns has brushed up his blackface 
monologue, adding new matter to replace 
some talk of questionable merit. The turn 
has gained by the slight revision. 

Motion pictures closed the bill, of course. 
Hue of the reels was done in colors, but 
with little more success than usually 
meets the effort to put anything but black 
and white on the canvas. The colors are 
necessarily crude, probably for mechanical 
purposes, and lend little of value. 

HYDE & BEHMAN'S. 

Junie McCree has it all his own way. 

The Dope Fiend," for vaudeville purposes, 

i* an offering of merit and novelty. Mr. 

\|c( ree in all the particulars of makeup. 

deportment and the delivery of his lines 

does a bit of really high class character 

acting in a position where a less finished 

comedian might too easily overplay. The 

text of the sketch is unusually bright, 

some of the slang deserving popular use. 

The act closes with a short quiet line 

which adds an artistic touch of sentiment 

and round- the sketch off delightfully. 

The support is uniformly good in the per- 

sons of Zella Frank, John 1'. Wade and 

Harriett 1 !o->&. 

Sabine, o'Neil and \ era is made up of 
two parts fair Irish dialect comedy and 
<-ne part graceful darning by the woman 
of the combination. The woman does a 
lot oi German dialect that might well be 
eliminated, but the two Irishmen are Well 
drawn types and their work is decidedly 
entertaining. 

Edw in Keough in "A Vaudeville Surprise'' 
goes all the way from Greek tragedy to 
a song and dance. A quick scene change 
is well done, but the intervals for the 
costume changes are poorly filled ill. 

Daisy Hurcourt is English soubrettc 
from side combs to heels, but good English 
ol the Vesta Victoria sort. Her ballads 
have the London 'all mark, too. The scenes 
from a London pantomime are well worth 
while. Besides »he is fair to look upon and 
very shapely. 

Joe Maxwell and his firemen's quintette 
show no changes. Their comedy is weak, 
but they make music with which no one 
could find fault. One of the best number- 
is a collection <»f the jingles which children 
sing in their street games, set into a 



charming medley. The act has a good 
setting and the groundwork of a much 
better offering. The substitution of some 
really pointed talk would materially im- 
prove it. As it stands the lack of these 
things make it seem stiff and labored. 

The Four Musical Avolos may be the 
first xylophonists, as they assert in the 
billing. At least, they hammer out sounds 
which suggest music in a way. Both 
women wear jeweled collars with decollete 
gowns and thus destroy the graceful lines 
of well formed shoulders and necks. 

The Wilton Brothers do a good comedy 
bar act with a bounding mat and James 
H. (Allien sings a quartet of songs. The 
songs are good but old and Cullen does 
not use them to the best advantage. 



FAMILY. 

The Sullivan -Considine house in darkest 
Harlem is handing out value received this 
week. 

Elliott and Neff are in their proper 
class. The best that ean be said of them 
is that they dress well and work hard. 
A much better act is that of the Seeker- 
Wilkes company, who have thrown to- 
gether a singing and dancing turn very 
closely following that of Greene and Wer- 
ner, in two parts, the latter a jungle scene. 
They have one pick, a very small girl 
with a good voice, considerable dancing 
ability and a lot of ginger. The costum- 
ing of the three, however, is bad. In the 
first part the frocks of all are dingy. 

Thomas Hay, singer of illustrated songs, 
was the hit of the bill. ^T4re Family audi- 
ences like their slides with the color laid 
on thick, also they prefer that sentiment 
be introduced no less positively. Kay did 
all of this and for good measure introduced 
t..c dear old ilag and soldier boys from 
time to time. Ray appears to know just 
what the Family wants and gives it to 
them. 

The man of Allen and Delmain as a 
simulated ''drunk'' in a farce sketch called 
for no apparent reason "A Tin Wedding" 
was decidedly good. The comedy of the 
act consisted in the woman of the pair, 
a husky giantess — supposedly the wife of 
the inebriate — throwing the husband about 
the stage. Many of the lines had a real 
laugh concealed in them on their own 
merit arid independent of the horse play 
that accompanied them. This man was by 
far the best comedian on the bill and got 
his due appreciation from the audience. 

Alice Hansen and Mollic Wilson made up 
a sister act of the well known sort. 
Their voices were pretty powerful and 
not too musical, but they dressed well, 
apparently having expended much thought 
and study on a pair of showy pink dresses. 
They would do well to put more action 
and less dignity into their dances. 

Lowande and Wilson's "Bijou Circus" 
had two clowns, a badly dressed woman 
and a pony and a dog. By the standard of 
higher class animal acts the dog and pony 
did very little, but the elown.s put over 
some rather rough comedy that struck 
the house as being funny. 

The show opens and closes with motion 
pictures which were mechanically as good 
as any to be seen in the city. The clear 
ness of the moving figures showed that 
an expensive lens was used and that the 
apparatus was of the best. 



VARIETY. 



ii 



SOME MUSICAL NOTES. 

Remember the famous "Oak Room" at 
Witmark's, rendezvous of the best song 
writers and singers of the day? Dropped 
in last week, oak room still there, but 
no song writers, no singers, just two idle 
"ivory ticklers." 

Reaching the street, 1 overheard a child 
speak thusly to its parent: "Papa, why 
do they call music publishers auarchists?" 
"Because they do not believe in royalty, 
my son." 



"Harmony Hollow" is amusedly watch- 
ing the song publications of the rival Von 
liizers, "King Henry and Prince Albert." 
When Al starts "teasing," Harry immedi- 
ately begins "sneezing." Should Harry's 
new ditty be "I think it's going to rain," 
Albert's new title page reads "I believe 
it's about to snow." It used to be "Never 
introduce your donna to your pal," now 
it's "never put your brother in the busi- 
ness." 



A short while ago I received a present 
of a Boston bull terrier from my friend 
Maxwell Silver. Preparing for an emer- 
gency a day or so ago I bought me a bot- 
tle of Doctor (J lover's Mange Cure for 
horses and dogs. On reading the wrapper 
around the bottle. 1 read among other tes- 
timonials: 

"Dear Doctor: After several applica- 
tions of your Mange Cure on my scalp, I 
have grown an almost entire head of new 
hair. Yours truly. 

".10 PAIGE SMITH." 

Can this be our Jo? 



The English music publishers have a 
queer idea of the rights of an American 
song writer. The American writes his 
song and when it is an assured hit, our 
English cousin secures the English rights 
and the words not quite suiting him, he 
changes an "if" to a "should." a "but" 
to an "only," and John Smith of New- 
York's song becomes in London: "By 
John Smith (microscopic type), revised by 
(type a foot high) H. Fitz-Roy I* Vere." 
"Revised" is good. 



Have read the advance sheets of Ren 
Shield's new joke book, "Local Stuff," 
which is labelled "A Sister to 'Buy 
Jingo,' " his former laughing success. Be- 
sides containing enough material for a 
half dozen different monologues, the hu- 
morous original "ads" of variety artists 
makes it a bet not to be overlooked. 

The Rounder. 



POOR VAUDEVILLE HAS FAILED. 

The craze for vaudeville which spread 
over the count ry a year or so ago is see- 
ing the beginning of the end in the small- 
er towns and villages where barns, vacant 
stores and the like were converted into 
"theatres" and vaudeville given by inde 
pendent managers without any knowledge 
of it for the least price that could be 
charged. 

At one time when a man "went broke" 
he took up the real estate business. Vaude- 
ville suggested a new line, and people 
all over the country opened a "vaudeville 
theatre" with the expectation that a for- 
tune awaited them in no time. 

There are numberless places throughout 
the country which come under this cate- 
gory, the manager acting independently 
or in conjunction with one or two. other 



houses, and had the impression that a bill 
costing from $150 to $200 weekly would 
attract $500 in business, netting $200 each 
week after the expenses were paid. 

In the villages two shows nightly are 
given with a matinee generally on 
Wednesday and Saturday. Some houses 

* * * 

placed bars in the "theatres" to help in- 
crease the revenue, but the inexperience 
in this line had the same result as with 
the vaudeville. 

The result has been that no patronage 
can be commanded. The people see the 
bill one week. That is enough. No $150 
show any place can draw business, and 
there is approaching a financial crisis with 
the small managers all over. Those not 
already "gone broke" are trying to sell 
out to some victim, and before the sum- 
mer arrives the vaudeville field will be 
depleted of the poor shows which have 
injured the legitimate vaudeville. 

The countrymen after once viewing a 
bill of this calibre avoid the real article 
when visiting a larger city, and it has 
had also the reverse effect upon the home 
trade, for a resident who has once seen a 
real vaudeville will not attend the local 
house upon his return to the burg. 

The houses affected are mostly in the 
Middle West. They book from Chicago, 
but are not connected in any way with the 
Sullivan-Considine Circuit, which gives a 
practically high grade bill at the same 
price in the larger places. 



VAUDEVILLE IN TOWNS. 

In presenting vaudeville in the smaller 
cities of from G0,000 to 80,000 population 
great Care must be taken in the selection 
of the acts, from the fact that the audi- 
ences as a rule are far more critical than 
in larger cities, but very appreciative when 
an act is liked. No matter how much ad- 
vertising you do, your audience is the best 
advertiser, and their criticisms do more 
good than anything else. Good singing, 
dancing- and comedy are what are wanted. 
Sketches as a rule are not liked, and we 
play but very few of these. The former 
idea of having the cheaper act open the 
bill is being done away with, as the first 
impression an audience gets usually grades 
the show, as to it being good or bad, and 
we are starting our bills with the higher 
priced acts. Colored teams with very few 
exceptions are well liked in the smaller 
cities, and are generally sure fire hits, 
very often making a better impression 
than acts which co«t almost double what 
the colored act receives. Headliners for 
the smaller cities are hard to secure, as 
the high prices asked hardly permits one 
to get up a bill within any figure where the 
house will come out even, and many times 
where a headliner has been a hit in cities 
like New York, Chicago, Boston, etc., come 
into the medium towns they do not make 
as good as the second rate act. An an- 
swer to all this is, An act that has the 
poods can always be sure of success, no 
matter what city it plays in, and it does 
not always follow that the name in big 
type will be better liked than the act in 
small type who gets the medium salary. 

Joe L. Weber, 
Manager Mohaick Theatre, Schenectady, 
X. V. 



THE KNOCKED. 

A crowd of performers were utamUng one day 
In a group, In the sun, on the street. 

Hall fellows well met. each one full of play, 
They would chaff each performer they'd meet 

They told Jokes and 6torles. recited and sang, 
You could hear them all over the block. 

Till one. of their number brought a cloud In the 
sky, 
He was the first one that started to knock. 

He told little things that had happened on bills 
And of managers and what they had said. 

Of a Boubrette that mashed him on a bill last 
week 
And said that she ought to be dead. 

He knocked every act that was getting along, 
Said they stole every gag that they did, 

And the only thing that saved So and So's act 
He did it when only a kid. 

He said that the agents had all - gortiTfiI~»oTe 

Because he wouldn't give up ten per cent., 

And as to that guy up on Twenty-eighth Street. 
Why he helped bin to pay his rent. 

And so lie raved along nnd swore 

And told all the lies he knew. 
Rut the crowd had slowly drifted away 

Until there were left but two. 

The one was a real old timer. 

With age his head was bent, 
His clothes were worn and greasy, 

And he didn't have a <ent. 

But he placed his hand on the knocker 
And said, "Walk with me up the street. 

Perhaps we may meet a friend of yours. 
And we can both get something to eat. 

"Say, friend, you've got a damn bad habit, 

You're a knocker; I once was the same as you. 

Now I haven't a single friend In the world; 
You can see what It's brought me to. 

•So clve It up, pal; It do< sn't pay, 
A good word has a wonderful charm. 

And If you can't say a food word for an act. 
Don't do it any harm." Fred Kay. 



TEN CENT PIONEERS. 

It is becoming apparent that the ten 
cent theatre through the West is spread- 
ing the propaganda of vaudeville. Par- 
ticularly is this the case in the South 
west, where from time immemorial a 
variety theatre has been regarded as the 
entrance way to the path that leads to 
perdition. 

Even the Orpheum in New Orleans, with 
its splendid reputation, had a hard time 
at first in getting the people to come to 
their shows, but for the past two or three 
years the best people in the town have 
been regular patrons, and there is no finer 
appearing audience anywhere than is to 
be found in the theatre on St. Charles 
street. 

In other parts of the Southwest the 
same antagonism prevails and it will be 
long before the bars will be taken down, 
but a ten cent show can live. where the 
extravagant Orpheum bills would fail, and 
they will pave the way for a more pre- 
tentious house in towns where such can 
live. 

In the Middle West they are more 
ready to receive vaudeville and already 
it is being shown that in some of the 
places a larger house and more ambitious 
bills will pay. Morris Meyer field and Mar- 
tin Reck are ever on the lookout for these 
place*, and the position they have won 
west of the Mississippi is not apt to be 
assailed by the smaller ventures, while on 
the other hand these cheaper shows will 
pave the way for the more costly kind. 

They are pioneers and as such should 
be respected. 



Gertie DeMilt, for a long time with 
Fred Irwin's Majesties, has agreed to lead 
the singing act to be called The Postal 
Telegraph Boys. 



MYERS & KELLER ON BROADWAY. 
Following the trend of vaudeville in 
ii> progress towards 'limes Square, Myers 
\- Keller, the agents, have decided to 
leave their present offices on Thirty-firs! 
street and will shortly locate around 
Broadway and Fortieth street. 

(lamped quarters in their present loca 
lion necessitated a move and new offices 
will be selected with sulli- tent apace for 
a permanent address for u long rime \>> 
'<>me. 



THE HEAD OF THE HOUSE. 

I stood in the hall about to light a 
cigar early in the morning when the Head 
ol he lions,, appeared in a bath robe. 

Why, how do you do?" says she. "Are 
you going put or coming in?" 

"That's a nice Utile cute remark," says 
I. "I have been standing here for an hour 
trying to make up my mind." 

"It would be better," says she, "if you 
.stayed at home and made up with the 
butchers." 

. ^What's the matter with them?" says I. 

"Well," says .she, "since I saw you last 
one has failed, and the other doesn't know 
me any more." 

"I ought to stay home and keep a look- 
out for you," I says, wondering how any- 
one could go broke when I was not around. 

"It wasn't on my account," says she. 
"It was caused by our joint meat account." 

"There's enough comedy happening 
around these diggin's twice a day without 
you trying it out also," says I. 

"Stop talking," she says. "Stay in or go 
out, but leave some money." 

"If you are home so much you don't 
need money," says I. 

"I don't need anything," says she, "ex- 
cept to know it* there's any continuous 
vaudeville show in town that keeps open 
until four in the morning." 

"None that I know of," says I, "10.30 is 
about the limit anv one can stand." 

"Perhaps you eat all night," says she. 

"Nope," says I, "just a sandwich or so." 

"Of course," says she, "I'm not suspi- 
cious and I'm not a lawyer, yet there is a 
difference of about four hours that you 
don't figure out." 

"What do you think?" says I. 

"I don't think," says she, "I'm alone so 
much that I've given up the habit." 

"You don't suppose/' says I, "that if I 
had nothing to do, I would go any place 
except home," 

"That's true enough, all right, I guess," 
she says, "but which home would you go 
to?" 

"What do you mean?" ?avs I; "that's 
pretty (love to an accusation." 

"Oh," says she. "I'm not the dub I used 
to he. When a girl has nothing to do, she 
reads, and there'* some looks that explain 
n whole lot of things I never understood 

before." 

"Not May Irwin's cook book," I says, 
growing fearful. 

"No, no cook book," says she, "there are 
others, though, that tell about warm 
things." 

"You had belter go in the country for 
a few weeks," naj's J t "this thing is work- 
ing on your mind." 

"I think I'll go Ion; just, for the experi- 
<i ice," says she, "I have too much time on 
my hand- anyway." 

"What's the use of going crazy?" says I. 

"How about the butcher bill?" says she. 

"Find another." I says, "who isn't too 
curious." 

-What do I get," she .ays, ''if I do?" 

"Anything you want." says I, "if you 
will also keep on sleeping when you hear 
me come in." 

'•That's » pood offer," says she, "I'M 
take a divorce.'' Sime. 



I i. ink «c Parry, circuit manager of the 
Interstate Company, and /<>.i Matthews! 
were married in Dallas recently, and will 
reside in t hat TeXan town. 



12 



VARIETY 



SUMMER PARKS 



BIG PARKS IN SMALL TOWNS— WHY THEY CANNOT PAY 

BY FRANK MELVILLE. 



The byword of park construction those 
days seems to be concentration. It is 
strange how misguided some. managers 
become in building a park by sticking to 
the concentrated idea and eliminating all 
natural beauties. There is nothing in this 
world surpassing nature "itself; we'TaiT 
bring out the best points of nature, but 
we cannot improve on them. What is 
more beautiful than trees, flowers in 
bloom, and a natural stream of water, ami 
yet in building playgrounds for the people 
to-day, what is more neglected? The man 
who intends to build a park in a locality 
where all natural advantages are to be 
had takes a trip to Coney Island, makes 
a mental sketch of the pleasure resorts 
there, returns home and builds a five or 
ten acre affair, covering almost every 
known amusement device, crowded closely 
together. The only spaces not being used 
for show purposes are the concrete walks 
surrounding the concessions. 

The Coney Island resorts do not elim- 
inate natural beauties because they are 
undesirable, but for the reason that their 
limited space and the great value of the 
property causes them to utilize every inch 
of space for show purposes in order to 
get all the additional revenue possible 
after the admission fees have been paid. 
There are no natural amusement parks 
near New York on account of the high 
value of land, but there are a few located 
in other parts of the State that would 
make a fortune each year for their owners 
if they were as near to New York as are 
the Coney Island resorts. 

It is not my intention to underestimate 
the value of amusement devices, their 
value and importance are beyond dispute, 
but imagine entering a beautiful park 
with all the advantages that nature and 
landscape gardening can give it, and in 
the background tall buildings, towers, and 
movable devices with their thousands of 
electric lights. The impression would be 
similar to that of a combination of a cor- 
ner in Central Park with that of the con- 
centrated amusement park. This will be 
the park of the future, and the natural 
amusement park will be patronized when 
the merely concentrated idea will be a 
thing of the past. More attention to 
nature would mean a larger attendance 
in the afternoons, a time when the up-to- 
date (?) parks, especially on hot days, are, 
practically deserted. Conditions in build- 
ing must of course be governed by the lo- 
cation and population of the cities where 
they are to be constructed. 

In this connection it is interesting to 
watch the development of modern parks, 
noting success in some places and utter 
failure in others. 

The value of park property must be up- 
praised by the earning capacity in each 
case, and a point to remember is that it 
does not cost anv more to build in a large 
city than in the smaller towns. Almost 
any town can support a park of some 
kind, but it is ridiculous to suppose that 
a large plant is practicable in the smaller 
places. The reason of this is that in one 
season every amusement device in a park 
has been liberally patronized by the na- 
tives of these towns, and even the out-of- 
town patronage is more or less the same 



throughout the season. The next season 
the patrons are looking for something new. 

In the smaller towns it is not profitable 
to reconstruct any material part of the 
plant, as the revenue derived throughout 
the season does not justify any great ex- 
jienditnre: All of the same shows will not 
pay again because every one has seen them. 
The man who intends to offer a metropoli- 
tan proposition to residents in the sub- 
urbs is confronted with difficulties that 
could have been avoided had he shown 
more judgment. Big amusement parks 
can be built in small towns, but they can- 
not be made to pay permanently. They 
may struggle through a season or so, but 
disaster usually meets them in the end. 
It is no more reasonable to attempt to 
build a White City in a suburban town 
than it would be to duplicate the Metro- 
politan Opera House in a city of ten or 
fifteen thousand inhabitants. When the 
novelty wears off (and this does not take 
very long), a theatre of such magnitude 
would undoubtedly be turned into a stor- 
age warehouse or something similar. 

The construction of a few amusement 
devices, .such as Figure 8, Old Mill, chutes, 
theatre and dance hall is ample, but 
the line must be drawn on some of the 
large propositions. There is no more 
chance of drawing satisfactory business 
in these smaller places when building on 
too large a scale than there is to regulate 
the weather. Poor judgment in this re- 
spect placed several parks last year in the 
hands of the sheriff, and there will un- 
doubtedly be more the coming season in 
the same position. There is no limit to 
the amount of money that can be profit- 
ably expended where there is a big draw- 
ing population, but the high operating ex- 
pense of the modern amusement park 
makes it impracticable in cities too small. 
It seems remarkable that managers do 
not profit more by the experiences or lack 
of same in others. Because an amusement 
proposition may be successfully accom- 
plished in New York or other large cities, 
it does not signify that it can be dupli- 
cated in smaller places, and were a little 
more judgment displayed before parks are 
built (and for that matter afterward) 
there would be fewer failures to record. 



The White City in Indiana pedis, under 
the management of W. H. Lnbb, will open 
on May 19. About $180,000 will have 
been spent on the resort by that date. 
Nothing but big open air acts will be 
played. 



Former Chief Hale of Kansas City, the 
originator of fire shows, will make a tour 
of the country with "Hale's Fire Fighters" 
during the coming summer season. Nearly 
a hundred vaudeville and circus acts will 
appear in the production. 



That the Starland Company, threatening 
at one time to place in Montreal a sum- 
mer park of magnitude, was only a flimsy 
bubble at best developed when it became 
known in the Canadian city that W. R. 
Scharton, the promoter of the enterprise, 
had mMenly left town and many debts 
behi ml. Scharton made a splurge in Mon- 
treal financial circles when he first ap- 



peared upon the scene. He is a German- 
American and supposed to be a lawyer 
by profession. A very plausible talker, 
little difficulty was met by him in inter- 
esting capital, and had he been experi- 
enced the venture could have been floated, 
lie preferred, however, to rent the conces- 
sions of the proposed park, receiving a de- 
l»osit on account, and lost the confidence of 
his hacker* through more oral predictions 
than actual developments. 



The Jockey Club Park at Louisville will 
continue the former policy this season 
under the management of Col. W. J. Winn. 
Only the larger bands will be contracted 
for. 



A report from Louisville says that 
Kiverview Park there will be considerably 
improved for the coming season and take 
its place in the Southwest as a live amuse- 
ment resort. Many new attractions will 
be placed, and a skating rink, 150x300 feet, 
will be built. 



A. C. Steuver, president of the Tark 
Realty Company, operating Fontaine Ferry 
Park, announces that $50,000 will be spent 
in installing new amusement devices and 
improving the park in general. Among 
the new attractions this summer will be 
a skating rink, and Hall's Tour Vaudeville 
will run same as last season, under the 
management of Col. John D. Hopkins. Sea- 
son opens early in May. 



W. J. Dusenberry of Duseuberry & 
Dusenberry, the owners of Olentange Park 
at Columbus, Ohio, says that he will open 
on April 20, with the theatre to have its 
first performance on May 13. It is also 
the intention to have a skating rink. Some 
of the best acts in vaudeville will be 
played and Mr. Dusenberry adds that the 
reputation of Olentange Park will be fully 
maintained. 



Colorado looks forward to a very profita- 
ble summer in point of transient attend- 
ance at Denver, thirty-five conventions 
having already been booked. Excursion 
tickets read to Pueblo without extra 
charge, and Minnequa Park there antici- 
pates its banner season. No vaudeville in 
parks throughout the State will be given 
excepting in Denver. Minnequa will have 
a stock company with the usual conces- 
sions. It will open in May, running 
through the summer without opposition. 



Syracuse is going to have a White 
City. Local capital has interested itself 
to the extent of $50,000 in the summer re- 
sort located on Onondaga Lake and known 
as Long Branch. It will be rebuilt, and a 
complete amusement field opened for the 
Syracuse public on Decoration Day. It is 
expected by the promoters that as Syra- 
cuse is in a deplorable condition at present 
for want of a proper place of recreation 
during the hot spell, this will become pop- 
ular immediately. The railroad people are 
supposed to be the principals. 



The officials of the Carl Hagenbeck 
Trained Animal Shows have arrived in 
Cincinnati, prepared to take up their du- 
ties. C. N. Thompson is general superin- 
tendent; Frank Burns, superintendent of 
construction; Herbert Maddy, press repre- 



sentative; S. G. Williams, purchasing 
agent; James McAvoy, superintendent of 
canvas; B. W. Bowman, manager side 
shows ; W. W. Scott, superintendent horse 8 j 
\\ T . Gillette, superintendent cook house ; E. 
Houghton, superintendent transportation: 
L W. Marshall, chief electrician, and J. L. 
Kuch, superintendent properties. 

The Hagenbeck show this year will have 
the largaat spread of canvas- of any circus 
and many new features unknown to circus 
equipment have been introduced. One of 
the special arrangements is a platform 
with 3,000 folding chairs. There will be 
750 people carried and a train of 49 cars. 
The three advance cars are very artistic. 
The opening date will be in Cincinnati on 
Thursday, April 5, at the Cumminsville 
grounds. 



The Frank Melville agency is putting 
ut a breezy little circular headed "The 
Methods of Illegitimate Competition." A 
quotation says: "The prisons of this 
State to-day hold so-called agents who 
have not done the right thing in the 
past, and there is still room for more." 



<> 



Dr. J. O. Orr, general manager of the 
Toronto Exposition, opening August 20, 
left this week for Europe to secure for- 
eign attractions. Most of the bookings 
for the exposition will be made through 
the offices of Albert Sutherland. 



Felix Reich of Plunkett & Reich has 
the bookings for twenty fairs this sum- 
mer in New York and New England. 
Some large open acts are controlled ex- 
clusively by the firm. 



Fred Follett, connected with the Mur- 
ray Hill Theatre in this city, will be in 
charge of the incubators at Luna Park, 
Pittsburg, for the coming season, taking 
command May 7. 



The Central Park, Center Square, Pa., 
opens May 28. All the latest amusement 
features have been installed. This season 
the park will be managed by the Standard 
Amusement Co., Will C. Sites, general 
director. The park draws from 200,000 
people. 



The Fonda, Johnstown and Gloversville 
Railroad Company are making prepa- 
ration for the summer season at the two 
resorts owned by them : Scandaga Park, the 
Gem Itesort of the Adirondacks and Moun- 
tain Lake. Prouty's band and orchestra of 
Boston, Mass., have been reengaged to 
furnish music at the park the entire season. 
The Rustic Theatre will be booked by J. 
W. Gorman and high class vaudeville will 
hold the boards throughout the summer. 



Crescent Park at Pawtucket, R. I., will 
be a summer resort this season. 



, A new summer park to compete with 
Celoron is planned by the Warren and 
Jamestown Street Railway Company, at 
Jamestown, N. Y. The Fenton farm, con- 
taining about 250 acres, has been pur- 
chased. This is midway between the cities 
of Jamestown and Warren. All that goes 
to make up a successful summer park will 
be provided, and a theatre will present high 
class vaudeville. Jule Delmar, now with 



VARIETY 



13 



Keith in New York, who has been manager 
of the Celoron Park Theatre and ground* 
since this resort was built, has not yet 
announced whether he will return this sea- 
son. 



and as the matter now stands the Won- 
derland people must take what is offered. 



Band business promises to boom dur- 
ing the coming summer at Minneapolis. 

The Twin City Rapid Transit Company, 
which has begun work looking toward the 
establishment of a White City, or some- 
thing similar, at Uig Island, in the center 
of Lake Minnetonka, will get as far this 
year as a dancing pavilion, chutes, lagoon 
and picnic pavilion, and possibly a circle 
swing. Although eighteen miles from the 
city, Lake Minnetonka is the summer 
home of the well to do, some 30,000 living 
along its 300 miles of shore line. The 

Twin City Rapid Transit Company com- 
pleted its trolley line to the lake last fall 
and is now building a rleet of ferryboats 
to run from Excelsior, a village of 5,000 
and the terminus of the trolley line, to 
Hig Island. The round trip fare will be 
;")0 cents and the time consumed about an 
hour each way. In going into the show 
business the company has engaged as gen- 
eral passenger agent A. W. Warnock, a 
local newspaper man, to whom communi- 
cations relative to this park should be ad- 
dressed. The company proposes to special- 
ize in band concerts this season and if the 
outlook encourages them to build several 
concrete structures next season. 

Campbell and Danforth are the promo 
lers of a now park to be opened near ()sh- 
kosh, Wis., May 31. The stockholders 
have subscribed $50,000 and the park will 
be one of the best of its kind, and will 
connect with Fond du Lao and the Fox 
River Valley cities over an electric rail 

Sf 

way. Outdoor feature's and vaudeville 

St 

w ill be given there. 

Celoron Park will open as usual in May. 
This summer resort just out of Jamestown, 
X. V., will be livelier than ever this sea- 
son. The theatre will play high class 
vaudeville. The .Jamestown team of the 
Interstate League will use the grounds 
at this resort for all the ball games played 
at home. The railroad officials held meet- 
ings recently and arranged for many ex- 
cursions during the sca-«n. 

Frank Melville while away recently 
closed contracts for nine parks in four 

<l;l vs. 



The new Glen Haven Park at Rochester, 
\\ Y., will be supplied with acts through 
Mr. Melville, who will have use for about 
2.">0 vaudeville specialties each week during 
the summer. 

The Ingersoll people are placing a great 
ileal of monev into their Luna Park at 

St 

Pittsburg, but do not consider that they 
are overinvesting, claiming that Smoky- 
ville is the best park city in the country. 



Mr. Ponderfoot, general superintendent 
of the N. ¥., N. H. & II. trolley lines, to- 
gether with Mr. Blake, amusement man- 
ager, spent some time in New York dur- 
ing the past week relative to the parks in 
their territory. 



There is some talk that the new park 
being promoted in Indianapolis may not 
materialize this season. 



The directors of Dreamland (Coney 
Island) held a meeting last week when 
plans for the summer were laid out. 



There may be shortness of light at 
Wonderland, Revere Reach, for a while. 
The order for machinery was delayed in 
reaching the General Electric Company, 



NOTES FROM LONDON. 

They have already started work upon 
Thompson & Dundy's new Hippodrome 
for London. The site is at the junction 
of Tottenham Court Road and Great Rus- 
sell street certainly a good one. The 
workmen are now actively engaged upon 
the excavations for the foundations; and 
negotiations have already been made for 
some startling English and continental 
novelties. Meanwhile, considering the 
acute competition among London places 
of amusement, people are asking ''how is 
it going to be made to pay?" Personally 
I think it is only a question of giving 
|>eople the right goods. If Thompson & 
Dundy can go one better than the others, 
they will get the audience, sure enough. 

Arthur Prince and daintv Ida Rene have 
had a very warm welcome back to Lon- 
don, and both speak highly of the in- 
telligence and quick appreciation of Amer- 
ican audiences. On Arthur Prince's open- 
ing night at the London Pavilion a num- 
ber of American friends, who had come 
over with him on the Baltic, did not 
forget to make their presence heard. Ida 
Rene is at the Pavilion and her husband 
is working that hall and the Palace The- 
a t re. 

The various societies of artists in Eng- 
land, which are now banded together as 
one federation for the betterment of their 
lot are -as you may have heard — petition- 
ing the big syndicates and tours on this 
side for an amelioration of the 'barring 
clause." Rut so far their requests have 
been received with an unbending at- 
titude by the powers that be. As a matter 
of fact, the time is scarcely a favorable 
one for any such appeal. At least, I do 
not think so — and for this reason: The 
managers are having such a stern tight, 
owing to the competition of their neigh- 
bors, that they do not feel inclined to be 
particularly lenient to any one. 

Many of our big stars, who have been 
away in the provinces fulfilling pantomime 
engagements, are now coming back to 
town again; and business at the big West 
End halls— notably the Oxford, Tivoli. Al- 
hambra and Empire is really big just 
now. At the meeting of the Empire share 
holders the other day the chairman com- 
plained of bad trade during 1905, but 
said the prospects for this year were 
greatly improved — which is no doubt 
quite true. 

In looking down the "calls" of the Most 
tour the other day I was reallv aston 
ished to note the number of American 
acts Under management. It goes to show 
that we appreciate American ''goods" on 
this side, and it is also very pleasant to 
think that our English numbers, when 
thev come to New York, have a cordial 
reception. 

At the Palace Theatre, where so many 
American acts open, they are producing 
a number of novelties just now. In fact. 
the energetic voung manager of that 
house, Mr. Alfred Putt, has been making 
several hours both on the Continent and 



in the English provinces in search of nov- 
elties. Rut he tells me that thev are 
very hard to timl. This is undoubtedly a 
fact. London managers all complain of a 
dearth of the right stuff. 

The Dunedin Troupe of cyclists left 
London last Saturday en route for Amer : 
ica. They are booked for a long spell with 
the Bingling Brothers show. 

There is great talk just now about the 
difficulty a new act has in gaining recog- 
nition in London. There is no doubt at 
all that it is becoming increasingly diffi- 
cult for new talent to push itself to the 
front. The chief cause of this, without a 
doubt, is overbooking ahead on the part 
of the managers. And they, it must be 
granted in fairness, arc forced to do this 
by excessive competition. 

In an interesting letter which I have 
received from South Africa this week I 
hear that the Messrs. Hyman are having a 
new and much larger music hall built in 
that city, which will be open shortly. My 
correspondent thinks there are big oppor- 
tunities in the amusement line in this part 
of the world— for some big syndicate, for 
instance. 

Mr. Frank Maenaghten, the controlling 
spirit of the Maenaghten circuit of halls in 
this country, has just started upon a tour 
of the world, in which he will combine 
business with pleasure. 

Mr. Rransby Williams, who is due to 
open in Xew York for a season next Oc- 
tober—at the Colonial, I think — is just 
now making a remarkable hit in panto- 
mime. This clever character actor should 
have no difficulty in coining to terms with 
American audiences. His impersonations 
of Dickens' characters are particularly 
good, and in monologue work he is good 
also. Harry Harper, 

Editor the Entr'acte. 

London, March b\ V.HHL 



The Chas. K. Harris Ceurier 

Devoted to the interests of Songs and Singers 

Address all I olllinuniea UollS to 

(.'HAS. K. HARRIS, 31 W. 3l8t St.. N. Y. 

1 Meyer Cohen. Mgr.) 



'Trice and Revost" (not Rice and Pre 
vost) are at the Canterbury. 



A novel feature at the Lyceum is a "bar- 
rel organ dancing competition/' open to the 
street dancers of London. In addition to 
money prizes the winners will have a week 
in Paris free of all expense. 

At the A 1 hambra large audiences are l>e- 
ing played to. "Parisians," the principal 

item, the ballet, i.s a magnificent spectacu- 
lar product ion. Mile. Jane May portrays the 
principal character. The floral decorations, 
dances, etc.. are all on a .sumptuous scale, 
but whether the ballet i.s a.* popular as ever 
can easily be answered in the negative. 
Herbert Clifton, a young mimetic artist, 
gave several jjood imitation* of well known 
professionals. Isabel Joy and Harry Lan- 
der being two of his best. Alice I Manila 
gave what is termed on the program a 
"zoological revue." It certainly answers 
the description of the act, as seven mon- 
keys, three dogs and two cockatoos make 
up the performers of one of the cleverest 
animal acts it has ever been my lot to .see. 

Sain Klton was here and went through 
the s.mie act he has been doing for years. 

Charlene and Charlene, Urban! and Son. 
Lata Selbeni, The Five IVhiteleys, and the 
usual pictures on a machine called "L'r- 
banora." all contribute to three hours' en* 
tertainmenl without any dull moments, A 
word of praise i.s due to the orchestra of 
over forty musicians under the director- 
ship of George \V. Byhg* 

li< rt Edward*- 



Vol. 1. 



N« w York. .March 24, 1!»<M5. 



No. 6. 



"THE BELLE OF THE BALL.' 

What a pleasure it Is to I 



bear an artist like MA- 
DAME SLAPOFFSKI. 
one of the greatest 
singer* on the vaude- 
ville stage, sing the 
above song, which sh" 
has added to her 
repertoire and w ill use 
In connection with her 
operatic ■elections, to 
Which there Is no 
equal, in her line. 

BILLY CLIFFORD, who 
»h playing the Keith 
Circuit, has bees win- 
ning praises from l>oth 
the press and public 
In connection with his 
singing of "Mother. 

Pin a Roac on Me." 

There has not h e I n 
one performance at 
which he has not had 
to sing from six to 
eight verses. 

"Sister," the great 
march song, which Is 
helng sung by DIA- 
MOND & SMITH. 
IIF.NKY & GALLOIT. 
and hundreds of o til- 
ers, continues to be 
the only march song 
that looks like a sure 
winner for the coming 
Bummer. Illustrators 

' and singers of march 
songs should lose no 
time In getting this 
song. 



HANK I). BRYAN and 
his AMERICAN 
GIRLS at the Colonial 
Theatre tht* pa at week 
are repeating the suc- 
cess they made at the 
other theatres of New 
York with their rendi- 
tion of Mr. Bryan's 
own song, entitled 
"IT M A K | S ME 
THINK OF HOME. 
SWEET HOME." In 
fact, at every per- 
formance at which it 
Is sung, It tilings an 
ovation from the au 
dlence. 

I NT ONE WORD OF 
CONSOLATION Is be- 
ing featured by Made- 
line Burdett, Agnes 
Rayless, Casino Com- 
edy Four, Al Camp- 
bell, Dorothy Dean, 
Oenrge Dale, Etta 
Elliot. . . THE 
Btf L L E OF TH B 
BALL Is being success- 
fully sung by Flor- 
e n c e Emmet t. Char- 
lotte George, Minnie 
H ifTinan. Marie Han- 
1 a n, Mabel Hudson, 
R iby Hart, Isabel Lu- 
cas. Carl Stumpf. . . 
MOTHER. PIN A 
•ROSE ON ME Is be- 
ing sung by Harry 
Brean, Harry Fantell. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

BOHEMIANS IN ONE NIGHTERS. 

We are now trouplng through the State of 
•Show Me" and Kansas. Sunday we relieved 
I'ueblo, Col., of all available loose change ana 
made a big hit In the home of the amelterers. 
Pueblo is the home of smelting Interests and Is a 
great little town. Everything was nice and con- 
genial. The Dig Scream manager, author and 
producer, Barney Gerard, Is now the owner of one 

more title, having become an "actor." No a< nt 

on the last syllable. Will II. Ward, the Dutch 
tun man, laid off for this week, and Barney 
jumped In and played the part. And he cert an ly 
made good. He and Andy Gaidner got 
together and pulled off some ludicrous stuff 
that never found space In the show be- 
fore. All. Hunter and All also took u vacation 
and Charlie O'Connor, .limmie Mahoney aud Bessie 
Gilbert Jumped In and played the parts to the 
(Queen's taste. Jimmy did a funny tramp and 
Charley a "blooming" Englishman, and they cer- 
tainly looked and acted the parts. Bessie Gilbert 
surprised even her most nrdeut friends. From 
Pueblo we went to St. Joseph, State of "Show 
Me." and after two nights and one matinee we 
cleared out. We made them holler. After we 
''shotted" them they pronounced us "the goods." 
Leavenworth, TOpeks and Lawrence, Kan., the 
"State of Carrie Nation." will have our company 
the last three da.vn of the week, and, flags and 
banners are now being hung In honor of our ar- 
rival in those towns. I hope Carrie Nation comes 
and looks us over, as we are using a hotel for the 
second act and mix drinks, and If Carrie gets 
nixed up with us. "more work for the under- 
taker." It is snowing real snow, and I'll tell you 
if makes us yearn for dear old Frisco snd its mild 
climate. We ran Into a snowstorm coming Into 
St. .b»c, and were held up several hours, conse 
qitently we had to spend some extra time trying 
to n»!i each other in a friendless poker game. The 
Big Scream was trying to think of a new Joke 



while awaiting the arrival In St. Joe am] he dug 
one up. "Where Is the best place to find happi- 
ness?" Answer: "In the dictionary." Is It any 
good 7 I think It sounds like an old one. Harry 
Vow man, the vnnng fellow with the gray hair. Is 
looking after Oera,rrt's Interests In the front while 
Barney Is back on the stage trying to be a funny 
man with the Itlg Scream show. The Itohcmlans 
almost did record business In Denver, a severe 
snowstorm Interfering. 

Next week Kansas City, and I am offering a Yld- 
di-b prayer that we are not welcomed by a cy- 
clone. The "mild" ellmatf In Kansas City Is apt 
to gn M ff ( ,n ii bat any day, and I trust !t will [>owt- 
po'ie any outbreak until after our departure. Andy 
Gardner has just purchased n new summer home 
in Joe Indian Pond In the Adlrondacka. 

I have Jus* learned that a legal holiday will be 
declared the day the Big Scream and the 
screamers return to New York, which win not oc- 
cur until May 23. 

No more until we arrive In Cvclonevllle. Be 
good. THE Bid BOREAsf. 

ATLANTA. OA. 

SIM! i.I. R, Thomson uiL'r. t Week <>', March 
1!», one of th«' best hill* shown IMs reason, and as 
a result ep'wded tvti-es are greeting evert |s»r 
forniance. I, emit Irving, songs, gofsl; Pederson 
Dr"S.. aerial rln^-^, Introduce a novelty which won 
: 1 1 • I • 1 ' • ' i -• • - Rogers snd I.avlne ii.'ned.v. fair: the 
f( rip's I tei'v. f.-tnale Inioei ator, a bit. Golden 

and Collins, rsp'd tire rnnversattonallsts. got many 
|rt nabs; Ru*«eI1 and Raymond, eotnedv sketch. 
"The Nrrlval of Kavallsk." went well: closing 
with [d«tnris and the hnrlewpie, "Our Seminar J 
Girl*." U'DITORICM f.I P. Anderson. rogT.l 

Special attraction week Via eh IP. "La Clgale." 
the Fire Da-nee* i IT Rsrah l»«rnhnrdt packed the 
Continued - n page 15. 



M 



VARIETY. 



CLIFFORD ORGANIZES. 

(Special to Vnrltty.) 

Denver, March 21. 

.1. E. Clifford, malinger of the Kmpire 
Theatre here, has organized the Clifford 
Amusement CompaQy« which will build a 
:j;2ril),(Mfl> theatre and hotel in Paterson, 
N. J., to open in September next. Clifford 
is the president, with Ix>wis Watson of 
Paterson secretary and A. V. Faust of New 
York treasurer. 

Mr. Clifford is also in negotiation for 
the franchise of two houses in J Ohio on 
the Empire eireuit. Noland. 



AN AFFLUENT "GRIP." 
The stage crew at the Trent Theatre, 
Trenton, boast of having among their 
numbers the richest stage employee in 
America. His name is Warren Dawson 
and he is a depositor in nearly every bank 
in the city besides owning extensive and 
valuable real estate. Recently Dawson 
created a sensation and brought to light 
the fact that he was well endowed with 
this world's goods. At the beginning of 
a matinee performance the report of a run 
on a nearby bank caused Dawson to turn 
pale and rush from the theatre. He with- 
drew his cash and was compelled by the 
irate teller to accept the entire amount in 
silver. He returned to the theatre carry- 
ing two thousand dollars in specie in two 
large galvanized iron fire buckets and ob- 
tained the permission of Stage Manager 
Wrighter to be released from his duties* 
until he could go home and place the 
amount in his "strong box." Dawson's 
wealth was accumulated in the wholesale 
fish business and he is now a theatre em- 
ployee because he says he likes "show 
business." 



HARD BUT EASY. 

The mutual desire of the opposition 
factions in vaudeville to obtain promising 
acts exclusively led one of the booking 
agencies recently to give contracts for 
an extended period at an increased salary 
to that specified in an agreement pro- 
duced by the artist calling for his ser- 
vices on the other side of the fence. 

The contract was "phony," but that 
was not a matter of general knowledge, 
and the result is that the deceived man- 
ager will be mulcted out of $75 weekly 
in consequence. It is hardly a creditable 
transaction nor would it add to the busi- 
ness reputation of the manager who was 
a party to the agreement if his name 
were made known. 



"CHERRY" DENIES. 

Miss Cheridah Simpson denies that 
when she appeared on Broadway a few 
days ago with a man's walking stick and 
a pathetic limp sh<> was attempting to 
attract the attention of the newspapers to 
a new fad. 

"It's anything but a fad." complained 
Miss Simpson, "I fill down stairs at home 
"the other day and hurt my foot. I car- 
ried a walking stick only because when I 
went into the store they were all out of 
crutches and I took the best they had for 
what was the matter with me." 



SCR ANTON? MAYBE. 

J. Austin Fynes was reported from 
Scranton the early part of the week. Mr. 
Fynes said he had not acquired a house in 
Scranton. He did not say that he did 
not intend to. It is said that he has an 
option. 



SCHAFER WILL KEEP AHEAD. 

A pretty 10 year old chorus girl bride, 
a frantic mother, a distracted sister, a 
perfidious advance agent, a designing man- 
ager and a deep laid plot with plenty of 
exciting situations form the nucleus of 
a heart rending tale unfolded by Mrs. Ida 
Belle Hall, the comely wardrobe matron 
of the Casino Cirls company, which plays 
St. Louis next week. To tell it brietly, 
Mrs. Hall says Edwin Schafer, one of Qui 
Hill's agents, had the temerity to do all 
the "fixing" for the elopement of her 
daughter, Ethel May Hall, and Max Ann- 
strong. The latter is one of the Arm- 
strong Brothers, cycle performers. Last 
Sunday, according to Mrs. Hall, her daugh- 
ter left her in a hotel in New Orleans, 
ostensibly to take a walk. Then through 
the machinations of the aforesaid Schafer 
she took a train to Gretna, Louisiana, 
where she met Armstrong and with the 
aid of a Presbyterian minister who was 
engaged beforehand married him. 

Armstrong, who is 22 years old, 1iad 
asked the mother for the girl's hand. He 
described the result as a veritable Vesu- 
vius. The young couple were kept under 
close surveillance. Schafer was looked 
upon by the mother as opposed to the 
union, when in reality he transmitted the 
love messages between the two lovers and 
finally fixed things for the nuptial knot. 
He is now two weeks ahead of the show 
ami from present indications will stay as 
far ahead as possible. Izatta Hall joins 
with the mother in denouncing the elusive 
Edwin. In the meantime, however, the 
girls continue to work together. 



TUCK IN PITTSBURG. 

Samuel L. Tuck, who was formerly a 
member of the theatrical firm of Hurtig 
& Seamon of New York, and who for sev- 
eral seasons successfully managed the 
tour of Williams and Walker, and who has 
handled other important enterprises, has 
been engaged by Manager Harry Davis of 
Pittsburg as an addition to the latter's 
business staff, Mr. Tuck, who is a Mystic 
Shriner, a thirty-second degree Mason, an 
Elk, an Eagle and a member of several 
clubs, has a wide acquaintance and will 
be welcomed bv the theatrical colonv of 
Pittsburg. 



NOT NEW. 

Some of the daily papers regard with 
surprise the announcement that Klaw & 
Erlanger are seeking a vaudeville circuit, 
the first two houses of which have al- 
icady been settled upon in Cincinnati and 
lndiana]>olis. 

Half a dozen years ago Klaw & Er- 
langer ran a circuit for several weeks, but 
made the error of putting in charge men 
from their own staff who had had train- 
ing in dramatic instead of vaudeville 
work. With the advances since made it 
is probable that more will be accomplished 
this time. 



MAYER MOVES, TOO. 

Al Mayer lias outgrown his present 
suite of offices in the St. James Building. 
After next week he will be established in 
room No. 810, on the same floor, same cor- 
ridor, but a little north by northwest from 
his present position. The reason of the 
change of bu-dness residence is the simul- 
taneous necessity for more room by Mayer 
and the moving of the former occupant of 
the new quarters. 



ONE OF THE REASONS. 

With the waning of the winter the 
vaudeville theatres receive the benefit of 
that tired feeling, given to the theatre- 
going public by a surfeit of 'productions." 
The influx has begun earlier than usual 
this season, and the explanation is found 
in the few musical successes that have ap- 
peared on Broadway • 

In the early fall, after a light summer 
diet, the wanderers return to town intent 
upon seeing any and e\\?ry thing that bears 
any resemblance to a "show." This is 
kept up until the appetite for gaudy sce- 
nery and glittering choruses is appeased 
when a diversion is sought in the variety 
houses. 

The continued run of failures of the 
lighter legitimate offerings have turned 
the crowds in the direction of the variety 
theatres, and one may see any evening 
before the 1 eading vaudeville theatres 
automobiles, carriages and omnibuses, 
emptying their contents into what is to 
the most an entirely new entertainment. 

'The White Cat," "Yeronique," "Babes 
and the Baron," "The Press Agent" and 
"The Rogers Brothers in Ireland" are a 
few samples of "the first aid in vaude- 
ville." 

•The Vanderbilt Cup" and "Twiddle- 
Twaddle" (at Weber's) are about the only 
musical entertainments of the comedy 
brand drawing patronage. The New York 
Theatre has been obliged to play "Little 
Johnny Jones" three different engage- 
ments since Labor Day in order to keep 
that house open. 

The most glaring legitimate failure of 
the season thus far has been "The White 
Oat/ 1 billed as a pantomime, but which 
was so totally ignored by the public that 
it was taken off two weeks before Christ- 
mas, for which holiday season it had been 
especially prepared. 

The dramatic plays have no bearing 
upon the vaudeville attendance. It is the 
musical and spectacular productions which 
are watched by the vaudeville managers 
with interest. 

A failure not alone means an increased 
attendance in their theatres, but also a 
rush of most of the principals for vaude- 
ville time after the "show" closes. 

It is simply a question of time, and 
not so very long, that a producer in the 
legitimate will think several times before 
he will invest in a play which is intended 
to amuse, but does not succeed nearly as 
well as the present day vaudeville, which 
may be seen for one-half the price. 

The public is finding it out, and while 
the public does not know that sometimes 
the salary of two acts in a vaudeville 
bill more than equals the weekly cost of 
a Broadway cast, it is seeking the most 
entertaining and diversified entertainment 
to be found, and finds it in the varieties. 



WELL ADVERTISED BEFORE AND 

AFTER. 

George Fortcsque, whose thick and thin 
portraits pre familiar to readers of anti- 
fat advertising literature, will be seen in 
an operetta April 2 under the manage- 
ment of George II. Brown. 



WEIGHING IN. 

By Earl* Remington Hinea- 

"JIOW did 1 coine to Iom? uiy arm'/ 

it a u ink* I've uever told, 
lor there are bouie things, pardner. 

lliul a follow likes i<> boHl. 
11 hi. .en away Inside bis bemt, 

\\ ilt'lv Uoliollj e.i li ,mv, 
And no one knows the real truth, 

Lxccpliu' (..oil ami me. 
Dul 1 llkf you, there's soiucthiu' here 

Tells me you are all real; 
Seems Just like talkiu' to myself, 
* To tell }uu now 1 feel. 
'Thus just leu years ugo this spring, 

And 1 was the rlsiu' star 
Of all the Jockeys on the track, 

And known Loth near and fur. 
Was stoppin' at the Waldorf 

Au' llvin' on the best; 
One day 1 suw a young girl 

A dinin' with the rest, 
An' 1 fell soniethin' give away, 

'Twas worse than any fall 
I ever got upon the truck — 

1 loved her, that whs nil. 
I used to watch tn-r come an' go, 

And every day it seemed 
That she whs grow in' part of me; 

An' all night long 1 dreamed 
We two was off together 

Away from all the crowd. 
(Of course I never spoke to her. 

Her folks were rich an' proud.) 
She had a fellow with her, 

A sickly looking dude 
U'on't think she ever noticed me - 

A Jockey must be rude), 
An' although she might have heard mx name 

Called out as I walked through 
The dining room, she never once 

Let on as if she knew* 
Tlint I was livin'. Welt, to make 

The story short, one day 
She and his nobs went drivln' 

And got in a runaway. 
I saw the horses com In* 

A ml leaped in front to save 
Tlie girl 1 loved, who but for me 

Now would be In her grave. 
I don't remember nothta' 

'Opt that she was safe from harm 
And I was at the hospital. 

Where they took away my arm. 
She wanted to do somcthln'. 

Her an' the dude, for me, 
Itut I'd accept no favors, 

Mjich less her charity. 
And so I drifted 'round the town 

And went nil to the bnd; 
My rldln' days were over 

And the bars got all 1 had. 
So I says, "Jack, it's up to you 

For a finish, * so I took 
Old Barleycorn sn' on him 

Was niakln' my last hook. 
But, what do you think, the other day 

I met a duck that said. 
'There was no use in dyin', 

'Cm ate you never could be dead: 
You Ju»t come back to this old earth 

For time nnd time again. 
Same as the sea goes to the clouds 

And falls iti showers of rain.' 
An' so I'm goln' to swear off 

An' take another truck. 
For I don't Want ter he like this 

The next time I come back. 
He said. 'That one unselfish deed 

Hone for some loved one's sake 
Will outweigh a whole life of prayers 

Them hypocrite gnya make,' 
For net ion N what's wanted. 

Not four fiu.-diin'. so that when 
We two meet mitin day equals 

There'll be 'somethin' doln' then.* " 



'■ 



L, J. liOring. for the past five years with 
the Nellie Mellenry Company, playing the 
Tudge in "M'liss," will give a trial per- 
formance soon of the new sketch he in- 
tends entering vaudeville with. It is 
named "Two Old Vets." 



WANT SOME LABELS? 

The following letter, which has been 
sent to property men in vaudeville houses 
throughout the country, will explain how 
some acts never seen in Europe send their 
baggage into a theatre covered with for- 
eign labels. The letter is given with the 
text unchanged: 

DEAR S1H: 

The newest nnd latest fad Is to have one's 
trunk, suit case or grip covered with European 
labels, leaving the impression that the person hus 
Just returned from an extended trip to Europe. 
To supply the demand for such people we have 
made arrangement! with our foreign office to col- 
lect for us a large quantity of these labels, which 
are Issued by the principal hotels, railway and 
steamship lines of England nnd continental Europe. 
We hnve concluded that one of the best means to 
distribute these labels is through the property 
man of some of the principal theatres of tha 
country, as they hnve nu opportunity of meeting 
nil the actors that come to their house, and as 
well they generally have a large circle of ac- 
quaintances outside the theatre. To show you 
how readily they will sell we enclose you a sin- 
gle label r.f "Hotel Cecil, London," See how 
easily you can sill It for twenty-five cents. The 
lnliels come twelve In each set. and. when pssted 
on a suit case look like the enclosed picture. 
Without any trouble you enn sell the labels at 
from fifty cents to one dollar a set. We mnk* 
a price to you of four sets for one dolls r. which 
will leave you n handsome profit. To give you 
an Idea n property man In a Philadelphia theatre 
■old lflO sets of lnliels last week at fifty eenti a 
set. leaving him a clenr profit of $40. He did 
not confine himself to theatrical pe°ple alone, but 
sold them eenernlly. He writes us saying that 
nine people out of every ten he showed them to 
bought a set. We will upon receipt of one dollar 
send you postage prepaid four sets of the labels 
%nd vill fill your future orders at the same price 
In any quantity. Youra truly, 



VARIETY 



IS 



Continued from pug* It. 

house playing "Cuiullle." UNDER CANVAS— 

Ymii Auiberg's Circuit begins iwoou of loon heft 
on April 5. BB1X. 

BATTLE CREEK. MICH. 

niJOU (W. S. Butterflold. nigr.)— McCune and 
Grunt, comedy acrobats, are clever. Bessie Cham- 
pion, Illustrated songs, la a l(x*al singer, and has 
a very highly cultivated sweet voice. Chinese 
Law son dues some tulking and coujurlng ami 
plays some musical Instruments well. Tom Lan- 
caster, blackface comedian, has some new stuff. 
Woodford and Mnrlhoro huve a little sketch, "A 
Timely Lesson," which pleases everybody. Pic- 
tures close the show. N. RITCIIIK. 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

POLI'S (K. I, Mitchell, mgr.)— Bill March 19, 
Jewell's Maiinikins are a big hit; Delmore and 
Lee In a fine revolving ladder act; Neff and Mil- 
ler are the hit of the bill; Frederick and Leska 
Farm, very good; Leo Camlllo, good; Carter, 
Waters and Company, fair; McLean Sisters, fair; 
electrograph. Coming, March 20, Cliffe Berzac. 

W. J. BYRNE. 



BURLINGTON, IOWA. 

GARRICK (Vic Hugo, mgr.)— Bill for week 19 
was excellent. Business is go»sl. Ferry in Fairy- 
land was the feature. Miss Frankly n, cornetlst, 
pleased. Kippy, a comedy juggler, clever in sev- 
eral new stunts, Ada ma and F.dwards In a Ger- 
man comedy, "My Dear Old Mother In I,aw," 
scored heavily. Vesta Montrose Is still popular 
with her illustrated songs. Picture* close. 

d. y. o. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
STANDARD (G. M. Arnold, mgr.) -Jersey 
Lilies* Extravaganza Company. The performance 
is weak in spots and not up to the standard of 
shows that have preceded it during the past five 
or six weeks. The opening burlesque. "The Dis- 
puted Cheek," with Dan Cracy In the leading 
comedy role, was pleasing. The olio, however, is 
excellent. Paul and Arthur Bell, musical artists. 
made a hit In their artistic rendition Of many well 
koowil popular airs. The Chamereys, acrobats, do 
a nice turn, the female partner performing some 
wonderful feats of strength. Ada B. Burnett, coon 
singer, made a good Impression; Howell and 
Kmeraon, singers and dancers, do an ordinary act ; 
Wi.shburu and Vedder, female song and dame 
team, were poor; Kara and Stetson, baton ■wing- 
era, have Improved somewhat in their familiar 
tutn, and make good. The afterpiece, "The Two 
Colonels," was poor, and itad a tendency to spoil 
the good Impression made by the earlier acts. Guy 
Kawsoii, the comedian, works bard and gets a 
number of laughs, Next week Weber and Rush's 

Parisian Widows' Company. COLUMBIA (M. 

C. Anderson and H. M. Zeigler, nigra,) -An excel- 
lent bill, beaded by William Gould and Valeaka 
Suratt and Harry Corson Clarke and company, 
pleased large and appreciative audiences. The 
opening, sketch, "A Fool's Errand," as performed 
by Lucy and Lucier. was enthusiastically ap- 
plauded; Alice Lyndon Doll, billed as the most 
beautifully costumed change set in vaudeville, 
made a favmalde Impression; she is young, has a 
fairly good voice, but Deeds experience: Al Law- 
rencp, mimic, had some new joke*. Ills act has 
been seen here before. Clayton Kennedy and Mat- 
tie Rooney In "A Happy Medium." made good. 
These artists made a decided Impression; Marvel- 
ous Frank ami Bob, gymnasts, do a strong closing 
act: the LeBrun Grand Opera Trio. Antoinette 
LeRrun, soprano, James F. Stevens, baritone, and 
Fritz N. Hoffman, tenor. In "II Trovatore." scored 
one of the biggest singing hits of the season. 
Harry Corson Clarke ami company In "Strategy." 
was the bit of the bill, and the applause was 
cyclonic. Next week: Larlnla Shannon, Bessie 
Clayton. Horsky-Bergere ami company. Melville 
and Stetson. Unlaw Trio. Lewis Mcflord and 
company, Billv Van and the Musical Simpsons. 

11. HESS. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

The heavy snowfall throughout the Middle States 
Sunday and Monday delayed the Incoming trains 
Several hours, and as a result many artists did not 
arrive In time for the Monday matinee at the 
vaudeville houses. 'Hie theatres were not affected 
Sunday and Monday when the blizzard raged 
through t lie streets and caused a general tie-up 
lr traffic. Nearly every cab in the vicinity of the 
Sherman House and elsewhere in the downtown 
district! was put into service to take the place 
of surface and elevated cars after theatre. 

MAJESTIC (C. B. Draper, manager for Kohl * 
Castle.) — Mabel f lite, who was seen here with 
"The Girl and the Bandit" company last year. 
heads the bill. She is assisted by Walter Jones 
In a singing and dancing specialty. Miss Illte Is 
a better comedienne than singer. ' The act made 
a good Inmressinn. The Slinon-C.ardner company 
presented Will Cressy's sketch, "The New Coach- 
man," which contains a number of good situa- 
tions, hut It is not up to the usual Creasy stand- 
ard. Nevertheless, the sketch was well acted and 
pleased Immensely. The I'iriscorfls made their 
first appearance here In a novelty juggling act and 
scored a big bit. The troupe Includes three men 
and two women, who In clown and pantaloon dress 
do some difficult Juggling. Havenmin. who is billed 
as the German explorer, gave a daring and en- 
tertaining exhibition of animal training. His 
troupe consists of lions, tigers and panthers. 
Steely, Doty and Coe have a comedy musical act 
that Is entertaining. The Avon Comedy Four 
• gain offered their sketch. "The New Teacher." 
which served as n vehicle to Introduce good sing- 
ing. The comedy Is too bolsteroufl for a good sing- 
ing quartet. Cots Williams returned with a budget 
of dialect stories that amused the audience. The 
Dorla Trio sang selections from operas and scored 
a hit. Lazar and Lazar have a nest "and pleasing 
comedy musical act. Flo Adler sang a number of 
songs and responded to several encores. Howard 
and Rutherford have a good singing and dancing 
sjiecialtv. Mlrzl von Wenzl. Rose and Hill and 
the MadlgatM completed the bill. 

OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, manager for Kohl A 
Castle.) — Martin Beck's Orphenm show is the of- 
fering at Manager Jacobs' house. The bill Is 
headed by Ye Colonial Septet, vocalists and mu- 
sicians, in "An Old-Time Hallowe'en," which 
scored a big hit; Merlan's dogs again displayed 



wonderful canine Intelligence and made a tre- 
mendous hit. Jules aud Ella Garriaou, in a 
travetty entitled "An Ancient Roman," again 
demonstrated their abilities to create laughter In 
large quantities. Winona Wiuter, the daluty 
singer end comedienne, scored a hit with her 
songs and imitations. The dancing of Brothers 
and Sisters Ford won merited applause. Edgar 
Blxley had a number of good parodlea. He used 
his excellent baritone voice to good advantage. 
Campbell and Johnson made a hit with their com- 
edy acrobatic act. Georgia Charters Lewis pleased 
with her singing aud whist Hug. Others on the 
I ill were Harry Sears aud company, illusionists; 
Gloss Brothers, gladiatorial poses; James Lucas, 
nomologist ; Bae aud Stevens, aeriallsts; Wlnton 
aud Wlnton i ml the Marrons. 

HAYMARKLT (W. W. Freeman, manager for 
Kohl & Custle.) — Bessie Clayton moved over from 
the Majestic aud repeated her dancing, which 
scored heavily. Charley Case had a string of 
humor that caused many laughs. Edwarda Davis 
and company came over from the Olympic ami of- 
fered their dramatic sketch, "The Unmasking," 
which held the Interest of the audience. Vernon, 
the ventriloquist, made a hit with his act. Syd- 
ney Grant pleased the West Slders with his mono- 
logue, and Hal Marrltt's drawings and stories re- 
ceived considerable applause. Baron's dogs 
pleased and Downey and Wlllard won favor with 
their playlet, "A Call on the Doctor." Carrie 
Scott was applauded as in the days of yore. 
Others on the bill were the Two Vivians, rifle 
shots; John M. Irwin, monologlst; Ratto Brothers, 
trapeze artists; Art Adair, comedian, a*nd the Cor- 
vey Trio, in operatic selections. 

INTERNATIONAL (W. S. Cleveland, mgr.) — 
Virginia Earl and her Johnnies were retained an 
other week and proved a decided drawing attrac- 
tion. Eph Thompson's elephants scored a tre- 
mendous hit. The performance is without doubt 
the best of Its kind seen here. Bert Levy demon- 
strated his artistic drawings in a novel manner. 
He is assisted by Dorothy Vernon, who posed. 
Ellsworth and Burt offered a comedy sketch, "Do- 
mestic Pets," and made a good impression. Frank 
Mayne and company, in "The Tipster," a semi- 
slang comedy sketch, went well. McCauley and 
Dona van resurrected a number of cast-off Jokes 
that have been heard in vaudeville for many 
years. They should buy new material Instead of 
borrowing it. W. J. McDermitt. who Is billed 
as a tramp comedian, did not look the part, hut 
he had some good par«dies and made a hit with 
a burlesque on Sousa. 

SID. J. El SON'S (Sid. J. Ruson, mgr.)— The 
stock company offered "Dimpled Darlings" and 
"Jollification" with good musical interpolations. 
The olio was good, and included the Pekln 
Zouaves in drills and wall scaling. 

TBOCADERO (I. M. Weingerten. mgr.)— Ro- 
ble's Knickerbocker Burlesquers Is the attraction. 
The company presented a two-act burlesque en- 
titled "Rellly's Speech." which Is well staged 
aud costumed. In the olio are Pete Curley, Lewis 
and Green, William Fatten. Belle Wilton and 
Aileen Vlnc«nt. Business Is large. 

NOTES.— The city authorities demanded $100 a 
day license from the managers of the Hippodrome 
Company, now showing at the Auditorium. As a 
result the question has arisen whether the Audi- 
torium, the home of grand opera. Is a tent, and 
the performance, "A Yankee Circus on Mars," a 
genuine circus or a play. The city's legal depart- 
ment has gone deep Into authorities on words 
and has concluded that a performance where 
clowns, acrobats and animals perform Is a circus, 
and the regular circus license rate of $100 for 
rich day must be paid. It» was explained by the 
mi nagement most emphatically that the perform- 
ance Is a play with a plot and the animals are 
exhibited as actors and play parts. The case is 
now before Judge McKwen. 
booked at the Empire, Des 
week. Two new vaudeville 
week in Grand Island and 
Tossing Austins Jump from Des Moines to Butte. 
Mont., to rill a week's engagement. Maud Rock- 
well is in Mt. Clemens. Mich., for a much needed 
i est. She received an offer by cahle to appear In 
Europe next r easo n. Neola. the Juggler. Is booked 
solid until June 11. Dan McCoy of Scranton was 
n visitor here lpst week. The Rosaires. who do 
a clever wire act, are at Cedar Rapids this week. 
Frank Maple, formerly manager of theatres In 
Minneapolis, Milwaukee and Chicago. Is now head 
cashier of the International Theatrical Company. 
James Connors, a wealthy real estate man of 
Janesvllle. Wis., has opened a new vaudeville the- 
atre at that place. Walter Keefe does the book- 
ing. The Six Musical Cuttys played at the IHJou, 
Lansing, Mich., last week, and Manager D. L. 
Robsofi reports large business. Sloneker and Gor- 
don of the LaSalle Theatre Stock Company will 
appear In a vaudeville sketch next season. Sans 
Soucl Park will have a new theatre this summer. 
A large sum Is being spent In Improving this re- 
sort, and when It opens In May the public will 
find ir.cny additional features and one of the most 
recreative resorts of Its kind In the city. Albert 
Campbell, formerly manager of the LaSalle Thea- 
tre, is negotiating for the theatre privilege, and 
If he secures the lease a musical comedy stock 
(onpany will provide the entertainment gjcre. 
The Empire Wheel burlesque house, the Folly, lias 
not been very successful for the Western compa- 
nies playlnc there this season. Jerome and White- 
side, a new sister team, tried their act last week 
and were booked solid until June. The Four Jug 
sling Ynles are booked until September, when 
they go to Europe. Mile. Vlda. wire artist, is 
now associated with her sister. Alena Kenne, and 
they do a double character change novelty wire 
act. S. R. Simons of Milwaukee, who books for 
the Empire, Des Moines. la., ws* In this city 
bonking some strong acts for that house. Ralph 
Johnson, the trick bicyclist, and the Four Dur- 
rars. were added to "A Yankee Circus on Mars," 
now In Its fourth week at the Auditorium. 

FRANK W I FSB ERG. 



er Maid," 28d. 
"Robin Hood," the 



Kersaudes' 
a. ih. 



Minstrels, IMth. 



Weedon's lions are 
Moines, Iowa, tills 
theatres open next 
Lincoln, Neb. The 



CI.ARK8BURO, W. VA 

GRAND OTER » HOT'SF (R. Rohonson. mep.l- 
Hnman nearts. 27. fair company and business. 
Howell's Pictures. March 1, fair business. "Simple 
Simon Simple." the f>th, pleased: S. R. O. "Mes- 
sage from Mars." 6th. good company, fair busi- 
ness. "Unity Tolty." 7th. pleased; S. R. O. 
Imperial Stock company. 12th to 17th. fair com- 
pany and business "Little Duchess." 10th. 
pleased; 8 R. O. Florence Davis, In the "Play- 



DENVER. COL. 

ORPHEUM' (Murtin Beck, geu. mgr.)— Business 
continues good in spite of the fact that wiuter is 
here in earnest at lust. There wus some stir last 
week over the fact that Lew Sully, who was ex- 
pected, did not show up. There wus a big wreck 
on the Rio Grunde and it was at tlrst supposed 
that Sully was one of the victims. Later It vwis 
learned that he had canceled because of illness. 
The Six Sa haggis, dancers, were sent to replace 
him and did very well, though they show the ef- 
fects of the loss of the leading member of the 
troupe. Watson, Hatchings and Edwards are not 
here, but their sketch, "The Vaudeville Ex- 
change," made a hit commensurate with their 
headline position. Mary Dupoiit has played In 
summer stock here for several seasons and is a 
gtneral favorite. Her appearance in "Left at the 
Post," a new playlet by John W. Cope, was in 
the nature of a triumph. Mitchell and Cain were 
not regarded with extraordinary favor. Mile. 
Flora sadly overworks the property man for com- 
edy. Her slack wire performance is ordinary aud 
only her eccentric makeup appealed. Drury Hart 
and Hume Richardson In "The Tryout" maile a 
weak opening number, but Ferry Convey scored 
a real success, his novel conceits pleasing im- 
mensely. The Klnodrome showed pictures of a 
moose hunt in Canada and formed one of the 
really good features of an ordinary bill. EM- 
PIRE (J. E. Clifford, mgr.)— Week March IS. 
'Hie Baltimore Beauties musical comedy company; 
opening farce Is "A Scotch Highball"; vaudeville 
section shows Zarrow Trio, bicycle pantomime act. 
Martini and Maxlmllllnn, illusionists. Bdna Dav- 
enport, dancer and coon shouter. Glenroy and 
Hughes, comedy skit. Rose Jordan, prima donna 
and Eddie Armstrong, parodies, assisted by Bertha 

Bertram!. CRYSTAL (Ira Adams, mgr.) — 

Manager Ira Adams heads with Mme. Vallecetia 
with her cage of leopards. The, De Graw Trio. 
• eccentric comedy acrobats, billed as Just from 
Orpheum at Salt Lake, are also programmed. Lily 
Mason and company, comedy sketch .artists, and 
Sid De Clairvllle. "the human fly," are other 
features. JAMES R. NOLAND. 



EA8T0N, FA. 

FAMILY (8. A. Myers, mgr.)— Opened 10 to 
S. R. O. business. The patrons expected a strong- 
er bill. Hafry Tyler, fair; Dick art|l Alice McCoy 
in their new comedy creation, "Christmas Eve." 
good; Hoyt and Waller, fair; Banta Bros. 
and Vondell, "A Day In Camp," musical act, 
were the favorites; Bernard Williams, illustrated 
songs, pleased: Jean Edwards, songs, good; Sher- 
man's dog circus Is t xceptionally pleasing. The 
absence of barking Is a noticeable and commend- 
able fp.iture of tills act. The vltograph closed. 

MAC. 



ERIE, PA. 

PARK (M. Rels, mgr.) — Another well balanced 
bill entertained large audiences week IP. The 
Klns-Ners, baluncers of light and heavy articles, 
also equilibrists, had the heavy type and scored; 
Phil and Carrie Russell in "The Singing School," 
have a pleasing act; Ray Maclo and Rose Fox 
proved themselves clever dancers: Harmen, the 
magician, mystified and pleased; Wills and Bar- 
ron in the sketch "Hooligan as the Insurance 
Agent," have a very funny act; Charlotte Raven- 
croft. In a refined musical act. won several recalls. 
Pictures close. L. T. BERLINER. 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 

SHKFDY'S iC. E. Cook, res. mgr.)— Bill week 
19 consisted of the Elinore Sisters, good act; the 
Three Lalghtona, fair; Transatlantic Four pleased, 
as did Dixon, Burt and Leon, Theo JuIIon and 
Hermany's cats. Show wound up with the "Sunny 
South," which Is the same old story of scenic at- 
tractions. SAVOY (Ceo. Albert Haley, res. 

mgr.)- Tills week's bill Is headed by Maggie 
('line, a Fall River native, who Is undoubtedly a 
favorite here. Dorsch and Russell have a g<w>d 
musical act. O. K. Sato Is a fair comedian, but 
a poor Juggler; Burke ami Dempsey caught on 
with the real goods In the comedy line; the Cor- 
don nie Sisters should appear with amateurs; the 
Elton Polo troupe, although the first number on 
the bill, have the most Interesting act In the 
show; closed with Fagan and Byron, weak act. 
Fair show to good houses. Coming. Carlotta tn 
Looping the Loop, Le Roy ami Clayton. James 
Richmond Glenroy, Reno and Richards, Charlotte 
Guyer, George Chris Smith and two Johnsons. 
Woodford's animals, NOTE. — Jules Delmore of 
the Keith office was In town this week, a guest of 
General Manager Hayncs of the Casto Theatre 
Company. We are wondering what it means. 
Wright Huntington Will head a stock company at 
the Savoy this summer, opening early In May. 
BOSTON (('has. &ehle*lnger, mgr. )— The I.owerys 
head their bnriesipie this week with an. olio con- 
sisting Of Fred Caldwell, the Dcltinos, DelsarTO 
and DclmcdO. Good bill and fine business. 

BON TON. 



FORT WORTH. TEX. 

MAJESTIC (('has. R. Fisher, res. mgr.)-- 
Week 12. good crowds. The Bellcinlre Bros., 
"perfectly developed" men, were amazing In their 
feats of strength and saved the bill. Latluls 
Dewltt, cornetlst. played well. Mons. Paulo and 
Mile. Marlow In "A French Frappe," were very 
deter. Arlington and Helston are good eccentric 
dancers, but their singing Is pitiful. Dixon and 
Fields. German comedians, had nothing to recom- 
mend them, while Simmons and Harris, blackface, 
were the worst ever. Illustrated songs am! mo- 
tion pictures. Next week. Otara Family. Boa 
Matthews. Raw Is and Van Kaufman. Howlsnn. 
bird warbler: Conkey. Juggler; Cull and Johnson, 
Klckko and Frigole. TARRANT. 



FORT WAYNE. IND. 
TEMPLE OF VAFDEVILLE (F. C. Stonder. 
mjr»\) — Week 12. the eighteenth week of vaude- 
ville here proves that it Is no vain experiment, as 
s. r. o. business rules. The Eight Bedouin Arabs 
top the hill, supplemented by Noblette and Mar- 
shall, Chapin and Lewis. Will Eske. Nina Bar- 
bour and the pictures. Week of 10, CIsyton, 





March 24. 1906, 


No. 4. 


A We.kly Word With WILL the Wordwrlght 



8END FOR PROF. COPY. 

The Itest storytelling ballad I have ever 
had the luck to write and as sweet a melody 
as 1 have ever had the good fortune to have 
wrutch for me, are happily wedded la the new 

Sure tire, Kid song, success, 

WHAT WOULD YOU TAKE FOR ME, 
MAMMA 1 

Words by Will I). Cobb. Music by Theo. Morse. 
CHORUS. 
What would you take for me, Mamma, 

What am 1 worth to you, 
If the mg 'H M WI came round, Mamma. 

How much a pound 
Would you take for your little Boy-Blue, 

If he was a rich old rag-man 
And you Ju>t as poor as could be — 
Don't cry. Mamma, so, 
I just wanted to know. 
How much would you take for me? 

Copyrighted and published by F. B. Ilaviland, 
. 125 West :17th St., New York City. 

ADDRESS ME THERE. 

WILL D. COBB, Wsrdwrlght 



Jenkins and Jasper. Marlon and Deane, Colton snd 
Darrow, Tom Ripley, Leonhardt and Nina Bar- 
bour. DE WITTE. 



GL0VER8VILLE, N. Y. 
FAMILY (Fred De Boudy, res. mgr.). — Week of 
19, Cenevieve McCloud aud company, Al people, 
active sketch with unsatisfactory finish: Stanley ami 
Murray, see New Acts; demonstration of wireless 
telegraphy, very Interesting; Tommy Dunne, Im- 
personations ami singing, good. The illustrated 
singer should learn his songs before appearing; 
motion pictures gtssl. 

THE AISLE SEAT FIEND. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

GRAND OPKRA HOUSB (E. C. Burroughs, loc. 
mgr.)— Week is. The Four Tennesseeana. a quin- 
tet, is the iH'st act of Its kind seen at tills house 
this season. Wayne Lamar, In a dancing aud 
contortion act, was fair. The Latell Brothers, 
acrobats, have a good SCt. Baael Rice sings 
songs that phased. Hlhhart and Warren. In a 
singing and dancing act, work bard and please. 
Peter J. Smith sings tlie Illustrated songs ami the 

kinodrone has some new rdcturee. SMITH'S 

OPERA HOUSB (Mrs. W. B. Smith, prop, and 
mgr.) Week IS, The Dainty Puree Extravaganza 
company opened to excellent business. 'Hie open- 
ing burlesque, "The Marriage of Birdie," made 
a hit, and the olio Is a gotsl one. The closing 
burlesque, "A Merry Bachelor," while not as 
good as I lie opening, helps to make one of the 
best shows seen at tills house lids season. To 
follow, Fay Foster company. C. II. IIALLMAN. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

HARTFORD OPERA HOUSE (II. IL Jennings, 
mgr.)— Week March 19, Cherry & Bates, comedy 
trick cyclists, did some funny stunts; Rlchy W. 
Craig had an exceptionally good monologue; Baker 
and Baker, dancers, failed to appear, and Miss 
Ashley, in songs und stories, was substituted, very 
good; Nick Long and Idaleue Cotton pleased; 
Louise Allen Collier and company, In "A Wild 
Idea," was fair; Lionel F. Lawrence and his Rlal- 
to (ilrls, In "A 10 o'Clock Rehearsal," gave a 
good, idea of the doings behind the scenes; the 
New York Newsboys' yuartct were considered one 
of the best numbers; Silvertou and Oliver Troupe, 

in a wire act, did some hair raising stunts. 

POLLS (Louis E. Kllby, mgr.) -Week March 10. 
the Three Cart molls, dancers, had some compli- 
cated steps. Eckhoff aud Uordon, In musical 
comedy, pleased, Al Bellman ami Lottie MuOTC, in 
travesty, were good, Dixon ami Holmes made a 
hit in the lighthouse scene from "Shore Acres," 
Gardner and Vincent, In "Winning a IJiiccn," met 
with a rousing reception; Gus Edwards' school 
isiys and girls In 'Primary No. *j:{," was the 
headlliier. The Jo*«ebn Trio, aeriallsts, did not 
have any especially dliflciilt stunts, but the |tosliig 
was tine. Tluf. Elect rograpli, "Everybody Works 
but Father," closed the bill. 

WILLIAM IL RHODES. 



H0B0KEN. N. J. 

EMPIRE (A. M Rruggemann, mgr.)— Bill week 
10, Holcombe, Curtis and Webb present "A Win- 
ter Session." Lillian Shaw, dialect comedienne; 
Hawthorne and Burt, comedians; Woodford's Aid 

ma! Actors, S|>l--el Bros, and Mack, acrobatic 

comedy act; Lizzie Evans ami Harry Mills, llerr 
.savona, Hodges and Launchtncrc, singers and 
dancers, klnetograph. A well balanced bill and 
every ael made fCtmrnV. Next week. The Military 
Octette, Nicholson and Norton, Ford and Wilson, 
Lillian Seville, Wortciiberg Bros., kim-tograph. 
Business big. JOHN J. BRENNAN. 

INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 
'"•\\t> opi'ip M«"'s<: ishater Zlegler, mgr.) 
— The honors of the bill for week 10 were divided 
tit- 1 itii .•.in.ts I. lower-, i he coined I an, and 
Lavinia Shannon, the sctress. J! mho Powers 
more than pleased In Ids sketch, Oi earning." As 
for Miss Shannon, she is such i< ravorlte In India- 
iiapolls that anything she nilgbl e«sa.i behind the 
footlights would i'e greeted here with seclama- 

tlens of delight. Her monologue, .The Matinee 

Girl." proved an entertaining affair, gracefully 
presented, stul local friends and admirers gave 
her a Warm reception. I <<\ and Clark. In their 
latest farce, "A Modern Jonah." scored a hit. as 
did sN.o Billy Van Hie minstrel monologlst, and 
the Five Mows Its, In their clean •cut eiub juggling 
exhibition, Stella Lee, the pretty little dancer, 
was well liked, and the other acts on the pro- 
gram, all of whleh came in for approval, were Die 
Musical Simps his In n good Instrumental spe 
clslty, and t White City Quartet In some well 



i6 



VARIETY 




THEATRES 

5. Z. POU, Proprietor 

Now Booking for Season of 1 906-07 

- 

POLFS NEW THEATRE New Haven, Conn. 

POLFS BIJOU THEATRE New Haven, Conn. 

POLFS THEATRE Worcester, Mass. 

POLFS THEATRE Springfield, Mass. 

POLFS THEATRE Hartford, Conn. 

POLFS THEATRE Bridgeport, Conn. 

POLFS THEATRE Waterbury, Conn. 

POLFS JACQUES THEATRE. . Waterbury, Conn. 

POLFS THEATRE Jersey City, N. J. 

POLFS THEATRE Scranton, Pa. 

POLFS THEATRE Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Artists Are Invited to Send Time and Terms 

Address S. Z. POU or WILLIAM MORRIS 



rmdered songs that came v»t.v near being ruined 
by the poor quality of their comedy efforts. The 
(Jrand will have Walter Jones and Mabel Hlte 
hk headlines next week. LOt'IS WESLYN. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

ORPHBUM (Martin Beck. gen. uigr.)— Week 18 
excellent business with good bill, having Valerie 
Bcrgcre as hcudliner In one act version of •'Car- 
men." Artie Hall sings and dances in an effective 
way. Border and Buckley are entertaining niu- 
alcian*. Bonnie Gay lord does a Sis Hopkins stunt 
that pleated. The Barosrsky Troupe have a novel 
acrobatic act. Jimmy Wall Is a blaceface come- 
dian with some good jokes and parodies. The 
Pelota ane Jugglers of ability. CENTURY (Jo- 
seph Barrett, mgr.) — The Bohemian Burlesquers 
lived up to their bill'ng as a big scream week 18 
to good business. The tlrst part la called "A 
Bohemian Beauty." and was a big go with the 
audience. The chorus work Is excellent. Olio in- 
cludes Ida Klcolal as a tough girl. Orpheum trio 
sing, King and Tremont have a singing and danc- 
ing specialty, the Kiln, with Miss Viola Hunter, 
have an acrobatic and boxing act; Bennett and 
Sterling are nomologists, Frank Wilson Is an ex- 
pert bicyclist. Week 2't, the Yankee Doodle 

i;irls. MAJESTIC (Fred Waldmann. mgr.)— The 

Casino Girl* are the attraction week 18 to fair 
business. The extravaganza Is a two act affair 
railed "An Unwilling King," and, Is above the 
average. The olio includes Allen Coogau, who 
dances in wooden slioes; Belle (Jordou punches the 
bag in an acceptable manner, Fern Comedy Four 
slug. Hal Godfrey and company have an excel- 
lent sketch entitled "A Very Bad Boy." Week 

26, G«y Masqueraders. YALE'S (Lloyd Brown, 

mgr.) — Polite vaudeville with excellent business 
week IS— NATIONAL (Dr. F. L. Flanders)— 
Fair business week 18, with Elsie Hegs, Nellie 
Clifford, James A. Hennessy, Miller, handcuff king: 
Brandon and Harvey. NOTE. — Jim Key, the edu- 
cated horse, appeared at Convention Hall this 
week in the Interest of the Humane Society. The 
horse had a bad fall OD bis way from St. IxhiIb, 
but notwithstanding his stiffness gave a marvelous 
exhibition. FAIRPLAY. 

KENOSHA, WIS. 

BIJOU (John O'Brien, res. mgr.)— Bill March 

19-21. Bannister Sisters, song and dance team: 
Edward IV Noyer, tramp turn, won hearty ap- 
plause; Louise Adams, violinist, took an encore 
every ■how; Be Vere and He Vere made a decided 
lilt in sotins and dances. The feature act. Roher- 
tl'a trained animals, greatly appreciated. Klneto- 
senpe closes show. Coming week 22, Albion Bros., 
Lulu Watts. H. V. Hall. Tully-IIo Duo. 

TKD 8ANFORD 



pleases. Helen Relmer in "Mr. Hulla Balloo," 
good. Will F. Denny, vocalist, takes well. Com- 
ing week 26, Maggie Cllne, Elton-Polo Troupe, 
O, K. Sato, Dorsch and Russell, Fagan and 
Rvron. A . B. C. 



LEXINGTON, KY. 

OPERA HOUSE (Chas. Scott, mgr.)— March 10. 
"'Hie Wizard of Oz." with Montgomery and 
Stone; excellent performance and business. 17, 
Miss Florence Davis in the "The Player Maid," 
supported by Elliott Dexter; matinee' and even- 
inn. 10, Grace Oeorge In "The Marriage of Wil- 
liam Ashe," more pleasing than the book; two 
performances to excellent business. 2(». Dora 
Thome, In melodrama, with interesting climaxes; 
good business. Underlined, Richard Carle, 'n 
The Mayor of Toklo." 



LAWRENCE. MASS. 

COLONIAL (H. Fred I-ees, mgr. L — Week 10. 
( ussy and Dayne In comedy. "Town Hall To- 
Nlght." A good laugh. Bellboy Trio still make 
a lilt. Byers and Herman, spectacular pantomime, 
good. L»> Roy and LeVnnh'ii. comedy bar aero 
bate, good. Young and Brooks, musical act. 



L00ANSP0RT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hardle, res. mgr.)— Bill week 
of lit includes The Hlrschorns, Alpine entertain- 
ers; (Mies W. Harrington, monologlst, sprung 
some ne v ones; •Morrlan Dixon, Illustrated songs; 
Beatty and Price, Ellen Metzger, Kinodrome. etc. 
Fair bill and business. March 20, Mason and 
Mason. Mid hell and Browning, Merrlan Dixon. 
Chat, and Minnie Burroughs, etc. NOTES. — A gen 
crnl "powwow" of the Crystal managers was 
held at Elwood. [nd., 18. Aside from "I'll take 
Hie same" nothing of importance was transacted. 
Next week records the last of dramatic offerings 
at the Dowllng for the present season. Vaudeville 
attractions will be booked through the W. V. A. 
If plans for the new (Jrand mature, the Dowllng 
will remain In the vaudeville field the coming tea 
"on. REV 1 1/). 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

IIOPKIN8 (Win. Relchmann. res. mgr.) — Fanny 
Rice with her dancing dolls Is the headllner for 
this week, and Is duplicating the success of for- 
mer visits. Brown, Harris and Brown acore 
strongly in a very laughable sketch, while the 
Ha uler-LaVelle Trio, with their comedy acrobatic 
cycle act, fare equally as well. Dlonne Twin 
Sisters nre capable performers on the mandolin, 
and altogether their act is pleasing. Clifford and 
Burke, blackface comedians, prove successful, and 
.lames F. Mncdonald, singing comedian and ra- 
conteur, shares well with the others. Pictures 
dose the ahow. PRINCESS RINK.— The Re- 
nowned Rexos nre serving to pack this place to 
its capacity. Tlieir act Is Interesting and worth 
while. They have added many novelties to their 
act since last seen at the local vaudeville house 

a couple of seasons ago. NOTES. — The Majestic 

Amusement Exchange of this city, under the man- 
neement of o. J. DeLgng, la proving a aucceasful 
. nterprise. The Arm Is Itooklng for a numls?r of 
Southern parks, and also represents exclusively 
several big acts. Qlenwood Park at New Albany, 
Ind,, operated by the Iynilsvllle and Southern In- 
diana Traction Company, will this summer be one 
of the finest amusement resorts in the South. 
It is undecided whether vaudeville or stock will 
hold the boards In the theatre. A. 8. 



LYNN, MASS. 

ALDlTOltH M (Harry Katies, uigi i A well 
balanced bill for week of March ll». Jas. Dono 
vnn and Reua Arnold were well liked lu their 
nidewalk con versa lion. Brockton, Mack and Bel- 
mont, in "A Couui on Mother's Account," man 
aged to galu luughs. Archie Boyd and company, 
In a Cressy sketch, "After Many Years," acored 
heavily. The Kaunas, acrobats, did some fair 
lumbllug. but their comedy did not take. A, O. 
Duncan, ventriloquist, fair. The Herald Squaie 
Quartet scored with their comedy alone. Mar 
-eilles, a very clever gymnast, opened the show 

and the pictures closed. NOTE. — James 

I Jimmy) Cow per. a Lynn man, now with the liar 
court Comedy Company, will enter vaudeville with 
Fred C. Stein, stage manager of the same com 
pauy, in a sketch by Stein, called "The Con Man." 
The sketch will be given its tlrst presentation 
about the middle of May at Proctor's 125th street 
Theatre. DAVE CHASE. — 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 

SOI1MKR PA UK (D. La Rose, mgr.) Week of 
18 opened a new bill which was well received. 
Lavlgue'a Baud, Theo, wlrewalker and Juggler, 
took well. Miss De' Lora. contortionist, was ap- 
plauded for her clever work. Barthelmes, pedes- 
tal foot Juggler, made a hit. Arto aud Delmay, 
comedy acrobats, were well received. Two 
Soulier*, French duettists, sang well, and made 

a hit. Fletures closed the show. ROYAL (H. 

C. Egerloji. mgr.) — Week 19, Merry makers' Ex- 
travaganza company opened to good business. The 
Exposition Four ($ Alexanders aud Brady), mu- 
sical artists, singers aud dancers, deserved the 
.i I .plans.. 'lliey have a line act. Brown and 
Robinson, vocalists and comedians, had talk aud 
parodies that went well. St rouse and Young are 
refined duettists. Sherman aud Fuller, comedy 
acrobats, won out with "Bumps and Bangs." 
Mile. Bartoletti, toe da net i*. Introduced a difficult 
act and made a hit. The company, In "Running 
for Mayor" and "The Mayor's Vacation" lutro- 
duced good singing and dancing. The work of M. 
J. Kelly, principal coinediun, la a feature. Next 

week, Williams' Ideal Extravaganza company 

OYMNASE (Jos. Bedavd. mgr.)— Weeks 10 and 2»t 
opened to good business. Corrigan and Hayes, 
blackface comedians, vocalists and dancers, made 
big hit. The feature of the act la introduced by- 
Mr. Hayes In a novelty buck and wing dance, 
while seated in a chair. Gordon Sisters, bag 
puncher*, took well. Al Burke, roller skate 
dancer, won much applause. Rosenla Serpentine, 
dancer, showed a good turn, as well as Miss 
(ieoly, In songs and dances. Kitty Arthur, in 
eliaracter sonus, was also good. 

AL M. PRENTISS. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.)— Agouat 
Family, minus Louise, head the bill, making their 
tlrst appearance and scoring heavily although the 
elieutele of the house bus seen similar work in 
the hands of the Five Plrlskotlis. Loalse will re- 
join the act next week. Uoolman's dogs, cats 
and dovs In a noisy act introduce two or three 
features new to the local public. Paul Klelst re- 
turns with the same musical act aud, although 
he opens the show, was given a big reception 
Sunday. The Great Le Cages have the neatest 
and best dressed aud staged Jumping act seen 
here. E. Frederick Hawley and company, in a 
new sketch. "The Bandit." are among the favor- 
ites of the bill. Bert and Bertha Grant, In a 
fair singing and dancing act; How ley and Leslie, 
and the kinodrome complete the bill. How ley 'a 
clog dancing la good and Mlsa Leslie made a 
great hit Sunday with her "child" songs, but the 
team handicaps itself by attempting a straight 
song at the opening of the act. CHAPIN. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
ORPHBUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Edwin 
Stevens and company, Marvelous Howards and 
Kruno and Russell failed to arrive 19, but opened 
at the Tuesday matinee. Willy Zimmerman and 
Wlllard of Carson and Wlllard helped fill the gap. 
Hose and Pelot, Juggling, good; Rawaon and June, 
boomerang throwers, good; Foster and Foster 
should Ret a new act; Argenantl Trio sang In One 
voice. Business Is good. Bill for 26 contains 
Goolman'a Dogs. Elizabeth Murruy, Keno, Walsh 
and Melrose, Beatrice McKenzle and company, 
Jimmy Wall. Fred and Annie Pelot and the aec- 

ond week of the Argenantl Trio. GREENWALL 

(Henry W.eeiiwall. mgr.). — Sarah Bernhardt 
opened in "La Sorclere" to a half filled house 18. 

Ti adero Burlesquera for Week 25. 

O. M. SAMUEL. 



NEWARK, N. J. 

PROCTOR'l (R. C. Stewart, rea. mgr.). — Week 
10: The storm and general inclement weather bad 
no terrors for the patrons of this playhouse thla 
week, as was shown by the erowda at aU the 
performance... William Courtlelgh made his first 
vaudeville appearance at this house in Campbell 
MaeCi lloch's playlet, "Fnder the Third Degree." 
He was received warmly. The Metropolitan 
Grand Opera Quartet In selections from Verdi's 
Rlgoletto pleased their hearers. Howard and 
North made a hit by Introducing a thread of pathos 
in their act. Green and Werner, who had to can- 
,el their engagement at this house aevcral weeks 
ago owing to Illness, appeared )n the novelty alng- 
itig v hnd dancing act. "Babes In the Jungle." and 
carry a pretty scenic set. Others on the bill were 
the IMcchlanl Troupe. Cellna Bobe, Instrumental- 
ist; Joe Morris, comedian, and Mlsa Cora Lane of 
Fast Orange, who gave cornet solos during the In- 
termission. WALDMANNS OPERA HOFSE 

(W. S. Clark, mgr.).— Week in. The New York 
stars are the funmnkers. Mr. Thelse haa engaged 
a callable company of comedians and pretty girls to 
enact th» two musical comediettas, "Papa's Coach- 
man" and "Easy Doeslt." which shows the full 
strength of the company. Mlsa La Couvler sang se- 
lections In both comedies and had to answer to 
several encores. Those taking part In the olio were 
the Farst Trio, Vic Jerome. Lottie Freemont and 
John Russ. comedy acrobats; Lena La Couvler, 
vocalist: Corbley and Burke, Irish comedians; 
Raymond and Clark In a conversational act. The 
i It of the olio waa the Majestic Musical Four, In- 
strumentalists. Week 26 The Golden Crook com- 
pany. NOTES. — Marguerite Fergvuaon and James 



K. Rome, former vaudeville performers, made a 
lilt with their eccentric dancing with the "Prince 
of Fllaen" company, at the Newark Theatre last 
week. The Todd -Judge Family took the places of 
Harvey and Walker with the Majesties at Wald 
matin's last weeklng owing to sickness. The Arab 
Patrol-Salaam Temple, Mystic Shrlners, gave a 
vaudeville show and dance last Friday evening at 
the Krueger Auditorium. It was one of the most 
enjoyable affairs which has taken place tills win- 
ter. The show was uipler the management of 
Messrs. Leon Stears and J. M. Lederer, and those 
appearing were Dan McAvoy and company. Th* 
Tour Emperors of Music. Mrs. Stuart Robson and 
company. Keller's Lady Zouaves. Fekert and Berg, 
Bailey and Fletcher company. The Ellis Nowllng 
Trio and the Vitagraph. One of J. Austin Fyne's 
"NIeolets" will be opened on Market street very 
shortly and will add to the chain of tils other eii 
tirprlses. He Is also looking around for a suitable 
site In 4Wh oitv to ludldu- vaudeville theatre on. 
When this snow disappears the work of getting 
some of the summer parks fixed up will l»e com 
menced. There are four In and about the cltv 
Flectrlc Park. Olympic Park, Hillside Park ami 
Fairyland, the new park opened by Melville & 
Shulthelser on the Newark-Paterson trollev road 
last summer. JOE O'BRYAN. 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 
HATHAWAY'S (T. B. Baylies, mgr.) Kxeelleni 
bill this week and bouses gcxid. Two of the prln 
elpal act! are favorltea here— O'Brien-Havel ami 
Kffle Lawrence In "Ticks and Clicks" and the 
Village Ciiolr quartet. "Ticks and Clicks" Is one 
of the most popular sketches ever played here and 
never falls to get a good hand. Of the Village 
Choir it Is sufficient praise to say that they are 
singing better than ever. Carroll Johnson's Bar 
torial charms and unctuous humor give him a high 
place on the bill. The Three Roses are pretty 
girla and good muslclana. Hill and Sylvian!, in 
terestlng unlcycle act. Kurt Ih and Busse, trained 
loy terriers, fair. Atlanta Spencer and com 
pany essayed to present a farce entitled "Mr. and 
Mrs. Nagg." The act was canceled after Moll 
day's matinee and Ford and Dot West were se- 
cured to replace It. New yltagraph pictures. 

KNOT. 



NORFOLK, VA. 
acme tWllkeraott * Jnauule, props.; -Week lb, 
lite Dreamland oins neuued bj c buries v. Auder- 
-"II ami Babe Laurie in tUe olio, lieieu Lambert 
in songs, lun, v* bite and Joliusou, Illustrated 
songs, good; Lomua und Adams, society sketch; 
Frank! UTt,' Laurie aud Irunkiuit, wooden shoe 
dancers; Acliie Zaiuan, chaiucicr chunges; Ruth 
Mailland, impersonations, Neluc Rum lord, uiusi 
cui uoveiUee; Cars* Sisters, back aud wing Uuu- 
cera, and Marion, hand balancer aud cuweuj Jug- 
gler; new picture*. Bi.miL (diaries West, 

mgr.). — This resort opeued the week with Carroll 
At Shaffer's Society Bells, introducing May Pen- 
man in songs and dances; May Beil, illustrated 
songs; Dolly Young, contortionist; Elsie ray, con- 
tralto singer; Rose Marline, dancer,* aud .Mill. urn 
Sisters, aeriallsls; moving pietuies; good business. 

AlDlloKHM tJauica Barton, mgr.). — Keuu 

and (ir.int hcuded the bill iu their burlesque en- 
titled '"Wireless Telegraphy," and waa one con- 
tinuous laugh. Others who helped to furnlsii 
aiuuaeiiieut were Minnie l'attersou, the Southern 
nightingale, pleased; Lou lx*oiiurd lu songs and 
dances, lair; Johnson and Sullivan scored a hit; 
Floreuce Edwards and her pickaninnies aud Leon, 
Adeliue and Rice, society Jugglers; splendid busi- 
ness. MANHATTAN iL'rliiuiau Bros, props.). — 

Leo Florence presented her four act corned), "Ma- 
bel Heath." The vaudeville fealurea were May 
Kelly, aiuger; May Moacb, mirror dancer; Edna 
M. Schaar. dancer; Billy Campbell, Hebrew Im- 
personations, was the hit of Hie bill. The ahow 
closed with John J. Maddens burletta iu two 
sceues, "Doughnuts," wblcb Includes Cecelia Mad- 
den, Emma Wallace, Edith Duquesne. May Harvey, 
Mai Pierce und Parker und Ward, tine business. 

WM. P. HOPE. 



PAWTTJCKET, R. I. 

NEW I'AWTUCKET.— Week 10, Matzonl, hand- 
cuff king, held over and still makes good; the 
Alvaretta Trio of comedy acrobats pleased well; 
the Joyces In Irish comedy sketch caught on with 
tlieir singing and dancing; Healy Sisters, charac- 
ter song and dance act. was good; Gertrude Camp- 
hell, whistling soloist, was good; William Beverly, 
singing and buck dancing, was clever; La Belie 
I-eoiiora In Illustrated songs saug In good voice. 
Pictures took well: the show concluded with a 
farce, and large houses are the rule this week. 
NOTE. — A. A. Belden stopped over to see the per- 
formance Tuesday evening; he Is on his way to 
the New York office to report at another theatre 
in New York State. The Zentos, Dan and Myr- 
tle, stopped over and paid a visit to the Mat 
Konll on Sunday last. Mrs. Zento and Mrs. 
Matzonl are sisters. NICK. 



PITTSBURO, PA. 

(JRAND (Hatry Davis, mgr.)— It la difficult to 
name the headllner thla week, although it Is gen- 
erally conceded to be the one-act farce comedy, 
"Chums," presented by Eva Taylor, Jessie Izett. 
Hugh J. Ward and Dennis Harris. ITie piece Is 
very amusing and was splendidly acted. Dainty 
Delight Barscb and her Broomstick Witches from 
"The Isle of Spice" give the best "girl act" seen 
here this season, and the dancing Is particularly 
good. Salerno commemorates his return with 
some marvelous and bewildering new feats. The 
Nichols Sisters are as ever the Inimitable "black 
gals," and their act la most enjoyable. The 
"F.phraim" song was new. The Two Meera give 
a serio-comic wire act that excels anything recent- 
ly seen here. Thercse Dorgevnl Is a French chan- 
tetise with a fine soprano voice, who slugs Ameri- 
can popular songs with chic attractiveness. Nat 
Haines gave a clever blackface monologue. The 
pretty Tobln Sisters gave a finished musical act. 
Kates Brothers are funny In an eccentric acrobatic 
act. Trovollo, the Ventriloquist, was highly appre- 
ciated. Adams and Mack were liked In a clever 
burlesque magic entertainment, and Young and 
Melville give some entertaining songs and dances. 
Harry L. Reed pleased with some old fashioned 
Illustrated songs, and good plcturea rounded out a 

magnificent bill. Crowded boinea. OAYBTY 

(Jaa. B. Orr, mgr.) — The Parisian Wldowa, with 



\ 



VARIETY 



17 



11 



COMING THROUGH THE RYE, JENNIE MINE" 



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4 



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Francis, Day & Hunter 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

WE ARE NOW PERMANENTLY LOCATED IN OUR NEW QUARTERS AT 

15 WEST 30th STREET 

(BETWEEN BROADWAY AND 5TH AYE.). N. Y. 

LARGE AND COMMODIOUS PROFESSIONAL ROOMS 
COMPETENT PIANIST ALWAYS IN ATTENDANCE 
ALWAYS A GOOD SONG TO SUIT YOU. 

If you can't call, write ui, and you will receive immediate attention. 

FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 



01 

■ 

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(ft 

3 



SAM GROSS, Mgr. Prof. Dept. 



1 5 WEST 30TH STREET, NEW YORK 



1 5 W. 30th Street new yorTcity 




" COMING THROUGH THE RYE, JENNIE MINE" 



tbe two skits, 'The Carnival at Monte Carlo" 
and "A* Day in Camp." both written and Btuged 
by Beu Welch, tbe Hebrew comedian, who opens 
wiih the well known "Dago" turn, which pleases 
the audience through the tirst act. Welch is a 
gnat fuvorlte here. John Honan, Pat Kearney, 
Ned Kelton, Sis Kelton, Flossie La Van, Katherine 
Randall, Mildred Valmore, Tom Owley and Mike 
Murphy bad the other leading roles. The chorus 
ilid good work, and was handsomely costumed. 
The olio included the Four Carrols in a skillful 
acrobatic act, which made a hit, and the dog, 
who appeared to enjoy the act immensely, added 
the needed comedy. The Musical Kelton*, a man, 
woman and little girl, displayed real ability, the 
child being tbe feature of this act, as besides 
playing several Instruments her dancing was above 
tiie ordinary. Owley and Randall are fuuuy lu a 
burgling act. and Honan and Kearney gave a good 
comedy turn. The Sisters Valmore are skillful 
dancers. Hen Welch also appears in the olio in 

his characteristic Hebrew Impersonation. 

\CADEMY (Harry W. Williams, Jr., mgr.) — 
The Jolly Girls Extravaganza Company won the 
Academy patrons yesterday in a program of regu- 
lation burlesque. They appeared In a two-act 
farce, "An Honest Politician," with good turns 
In the olio. John Berg, Sam Sidinan, George T. 
Mavis and May Melville were well placed in the 
leading roles. Tbe chorus was up to the average 
and cosluiues attractive. Amy Hawthorne's imi- 
tations of Chevalier were clever and won much 
applause. 'Hie Radium (Jlrls were a decided novel- 
ty, but their dance, Illuminated only by the light 
from their costumes, proved rather ghastly. Mel- 
ville and Ashton were well liked, and Miss Mel- 
ville's monologue went with a rush. LeCla-lre and 
Hart, who have just joined the company, have a 
splendid travesty act with good acrobatic features. 
The Leffcl Trio,' lu a rebounding net ami bar act. 
was appreciated, and (ieorge T. Davis closed the 
olio with illustrated songs. 

MADAME riTT. 



POTTSTOWN, PA. 
GRAND OPERA HOCSE (Wm. Porter, Jr.. 
mgr. ) March 15-17, Miller Bros., Diorama, good; 
Cogan and Bancroft, comedy roller skaters, a hit; 
Mr. and Mrs. Nick Hughes, comedy sketch, intro- 
ducing Ringing and dancing, fair; Eleanor Blanch- 
aid's imitations of stage celebrities, are clever; 
English and Gaudy, comedy entertainers, good. 
The pictures end the show. Rusiuess Increasing. 
March 19-21, Byron and Blanch, with "Matri- 
monial Sweets In Pamlly Jars," carry the bouse. 
Kin-Kaht. comedy Juggler, good; Esher Sisters, 
sinking and dancing, clever dancers; Whnlen and 
West, singers and eccentric dancers, keep the 
audience with them. Klnetograph ends the show. 
( apaclty business. March 22-24. Creo. European 
novelty: Harry La Marr. Pour Shannons. Harry 

Green. Golden and Hughes and others APDI- 

tiiIIUM FAMILY THEATRE (Brown & C.erhart. 
mgrs.) — March 10-24, Tom Almond, singing and 
dancing comedian, made a bit with the audience; 
the Fshers made good in their melodrama: Robin- 
son anil Grant had the audience with them. 
Business is good. J. II. WEITZENKORN. 



POUOHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

FAMILY (R. R. Sweet, res. mgr.)— Gertie Rey- 
nolds and her Twirley (Jlrls head the bill: big 
hit. McCarthy and'RIena. "Coonvllle Courtship." 
also hit. Miss Rlena deserves special mention for 
her perfect negro dialect. Laceutra and Larue, 
comedy musical act, another bit. Josef Yarrlck, 
s<|.yit|n> mysteries, exceptionally good. Leo Renn, 
the English Eccentric, fair. M. J. Walsh Dramatic 
company (local .talent), that's all. Motion pic- 
tures fine. This has been one of the strongest 
bills seen at the Family. Rnslness big. 

W\ C. MATTERN. 



RACINE, WIS. 

BIJOU (Jones & O'Rrlen Circuit; William C. 
Tiede. local mgr.).— Rill week 19. Albion Rros., 
comedy boxing act. caused a .great deal of ap- 
plause; Dorothy Aladonne, vocalist, well liked; 
R. V. Hill, musical act. good; Tally-Ho Duo, 
singing, the hit of the show; Rannlster Sisters, 
singing' and dancing, good act and well liked. 
Loulae Adame, violin soloist, does some good play- 



ing. Fd. De Doyer. acrobatic dancing and sing- 
Ing; \\ illig and Larkln, comedy sketch, good. 
Moving pictures close the show. Capacity houses 
at nearly all performances. 

WILLIAM J. McILRATH. 



READING, PA. 

ORPHEUM (Frank . D. Hil], mgr.)— The bill 
week 19 was very pleasing. The Empire City 
Quartet presented a tine singing act with Just 
enough comedy, and were the hit of the bill. Ed 
Reynard, In his ventribxpilal number, was a close 
second. His Sgurca are the l>est that have lieen 
presented here this. season. Matthews ami Harris, 
in "Adam the Second," were the laughing hit of 
the bill. Francelll and Lewis, in "The Bally- 
Hoo. " pleased. Dixon, Bowers and Dixon, the 
three Ruben, went well. Avery and Hart, a col- 
ored team, registered a hit. Torbay opened the 
show nicely with comedy shadowgraphs and the 
Klnetograph sent them home well pleased. Com 
lug next week. Watson's Farmyard. Monroe, Mack 
and Lawrence, Stuart Barnes, Rooney and Rent. 
Bessie Yaldare Troupe, Village Choir, Couture ami 
Gillette and the Klnetograph. MACK. 



RUTLAND, VT. 

OPERA 1IOFSE (Boyle and Brehmer. mgrs.) — 
Week 12 (five nights), Rcnnett Moulton company 
presented the Two Clertnontos. singers, dancers 
and sketch artists; Fred Dllger, monologue; Ea- 
telle Plunkett, songs and dances; Juniper and 
Hayes, comedy coon and octoroon, ami moving 
pictures. All took well. lTith. De Rue Rros.' 
Minstrels played to good house and gave satis 
faction. The olio Introduced interesting iiiiiiiIhts. 
including Tiie Four Dancing Marvels and Walter 
Hansen*, Bobby and Saw In De Rue, the Musical 
Minstrels: Harvey Dunn. bag puncher; Billy 
De Rue, monologue; Hill and Adams, comedy 
acrobats, and the Ideal Quartet. All took well. 

AL M. PRENTISS. 



SAGINAW, MICH. 

JEFFFRS' 1 Sam S. Marks, mgr.).— The topllners 
week of IS are Tempest and Sunshine, two clever 
young people who do a singing and dancing act, 
and were enthusiastically received. North Rrothers 
still hold the boards and continue In favor, doing 
a different play nightly. Grace Whltcher pleases 
as usual with her singing, and illustrated songs 
by Blanche Swigart were well received. 

NENO. 



SAN JOSE. CAL. 

This week, March ."» to 10, has been a quiet one 
theatrically. Save for Monday night when Ole 
Olson served to get capacity and Wednesday 
night when "The County Chairman" filled the 
house, the Victory has been dark. With Dlda as 
Its headlluer and a good supporting bill the 
Pulque has prospered well. The Redmond com- 
pany at the Jose still are favorites at that house. 
San Joseans are pleased to note that Lionel Law- 
rence is again on Broadway, Lawrence Is a big 
favorite here. Next week VICTORY. 1.1. Flor- 
enep Roberts; 17. "Barbara Frletchle;" 18. "Mv 
Wife's Family." UNIQUE, vaudeville. JOSE. 
Redmond company In repertoire. 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

LYRIC (Win. Gnlney, mgr.) Week 10, T. W. 
IHnklus brought a very good show with him this 
week; He presented the Baltimore Beauties In "A 
Scotch Highball" and "A Busy Night." which 
pleased, and ■ eery food olio. Good business all 
week. NOTE. — Amateur night bns been Inau- 
gurated here and proves popular. -BON 'IV)N (J. 
II. Young, nig.*/* — Week 12. Martin and Martlne. 
the Tlml>er Lady and a Lobster. In song and 
dance; Russell Rros. In dialogue and dance; Cat* 
tlllan Quartet, with their "El Melodioso," were 
the hit of the week; Illustrated songs and the 
klretoseope. Amateur night on Fridays draws 

good crowds. Good sized audiences all week. 

ORPHEUM (Jules P. Blstes. mgr. ) -Week 12. J 
F. Dooley. In »ong and dance, was good; Mildred 
Flora on the slack wire, the Bo*cb Pamlly, the 
De Oraw Trio, O'Rourke Trio and Hart and Rich- 
ardson were all good. Pictures close the abow. 
Good business all week. SALT LAKE (Geo. D. 



Pyper, mgi > —Mai. is and it;, tbe Primrose Miu 
srrels filled the house to two matinees and even- 
ings aud presented a good bill. George Primrose 
is a splendid dancer and he has taught his men 
the trick to perfection. Gus Read, Emile Subers 
and C. N. Reiuhart delighted all with their slug 
Ing. J. L. JOHNSON. 

SAN DIEOO, CAL. 

PICKWICK (Palmer & Fulkcrsou, mgrs.) — 
Jack Golden ami the Pickwick players in "A 

Friend of the Family," are pleasing good audi- 
ences, considering Lent, and the vaudeville is 
beaded by Musical Bentley, with his xylophone, 
who scored u big hit. Janette Monitor, contor- 
tionist, has a very clever act. done gracefully, 
and without apparent effort. The Three Witches, 
in singing, are very fair. The mule member of 
the trio tried to "comede," but made a poor trial, 
and wisely cut the comedy oil Tuesday. Ed 
Hutchinson, composer of "Sammy," introduced his 
piano specialty during the playlet and made a- 

hit. GRAND (De Latour & Fields, mgrs.) — 

This house is putting on cc.ncdics with a stock 
company, ami this week "Uncle Josh Spruceby" 
is the bill. The vaudeville includes Earl and Wil 
sou in a clever musical specialty, ami the De 
Latour Sisters. Business fair. NOTES. — Larry 
Weaver, of the Pickwick Players, goes to the 
Mission Theatre in San Francisco, April 2, to 
produce comedies. His wife goes with him. 



NOILS. Colonel Crawford, hcud of the Craw- 
ford circuit, puid hit* St. Louhj house a visit Sun 
day. Both of the Clemenso brotbera are ill and 
unable to work with the Crackerjacks. 

JOE PAZEN 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ORPHEUM (John Morrisey, mgr.)— Week 12, 
Thomas J. Keogh and company, Sullivan and Pas 
quelena, Watson and Morrisey, Lillian Burkhart 
and company, Four Piccolo Midgets, Marshall P. 
Wilder, Agnes Mahr, Mile. Chester and her statue 

dog and olograph. Packed houses all week. 

LYCEUM (AL J. Flournoy, mgr.)— Dlda, Em- 
mouds, Emerson and Emmonds, Gibson and Gib- 
ion, Emily Nice, Katherine Walsh Jerome, Homer 

Long and moving pictures. EMPIRE (W. A. 

Weston, mgr.) — Five Ashtons, the Jolly Prices, 
James Yin. J. S. Monroe. Dale Ryan and ani- 
mated pictures.—— NOVELTY (Sam Loverich, 
mgr.) — The Three Jolters. Marques and Lyn, 
Blondle Robinson, Bessie K. Tyler and moving 

pictures. CHUTES (Ed Lew, mgr.)— The 

Ouzos, Ethel Whitesides and picks, Bell Trio. 
Nellie Montgomery and moving pictures. MIS- 
SION (J. Fried, mgr.) — Grace Sisters, Diamond 
and May, Frank Hayes, Four Cow els, Nat Went- 

worth and moving pictures. BALDWIN (Blum 

& Tiffany, mgrs.) — London Blunt, Frederic Irwin, 
the Beverleys, La Petite, Ricardo, M. Adelade 

Powers and company and animated pictures. 

NOTES.— The Sixteenth Street Theatre, in course 
of construction, collapsed last Wednesday at 5 
a. m, and is a total wreck. Two people narrowly 
escaped being crushed to death. The loss Is esti- 
mated at about $10,000. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

SEATTLE (John Cort. mgr.)— Rellly and 
Wood's big show opened Sunday matinee. Of all 
the burlesque companies of the season this Is one 
of the best. They give a good show from start to 
finlab. The olio includes Ira Kessner, pictured 
melodiea; Kennedy and Fvans. Revere Sisters, the 
Golden Ballet, Daly ami Renn. comedy acrobats; 
Frank Orth and Harry S. Fern In their skit. "Sign 
That Rook." The closing act, "A Hot Time at 
Reilly's," Is good. Next week, "Miss New York. 

Jr." STAR (M. G. Winstock, mgr.)— Charles 

E. Austin, comedy wire performer, the Mu.dcal 
Shlrleys. .Tap Lorene, Rcntfrow aud Jansen, Pete 
Duiisworth. De Mora and Gracla, European acro- 
bats; Isabel Jansen. soprano; the Three Arm- 
strongs, trick cyclists; the starascope. OR- 
PHEUM (Mgr. Donnellan).— The Dentons. White 
and Ashton. Phillips and Falldeep, Charles Brown. 
Mildren Manning. W. II. Stetson. Orpheumscope. 

PANTAGES (Alex Pautages, mgr.)— Wilson 

and Leicester, Southern Quartet. Kitty Kirkham. 
Arneldo. Arthur .Elwell, Charles E. Royal and 

company. Pantagescope. CENTRAIL (Mgr. 

Shannon.) — The great Anna Abbott, Tennis Trio. 
Mlnlto, Geo. Rates. Sadie Hite and the Centrall- 
scope. GKE GEE REE. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Another snowstorm which began on Sunday com 
pletely tUd up the street car system, but did not 
dampen the enthusiasm of amusement seekers. 
Everybody had to walk to and from the theatres 
The snowfall was 16 Inches. 

COLUMBIA (Frank Tate, mgr.) -Emmett Cor 
rlgnn and company presented the playlet, "The 
Card Party." In which they made a big hit. Wills 
and Morris, the black faced minstrel girls, were 
very funny In their rendition of endmen's songs 
and gags. Th"se two acts were the bea (Itinera of 
the program. The Marco Twins were a gro 
teeque novelty and brought down the house. Prey- 
do Rrother-' did an excellent hand to hand bai- 
iming act. The lloldsworths. billed as singers 
and dancers, did, a banjo playing specialty which 
pleased. GIrard asd Gardner deserved a better 
place on the bill in their sketch entitled, "Dooley 
and the Diamond." Klliotte and Bolus old mat 
novelty dam-lng. The three Weston Sisters do 
considerable Instrument playing, in fact too much. 
Avcrv Straknseh has Ix'en seen here so often that 
her work was hardly appreciated. Next week. 
Simon and Gardner company. The Piriscotlis. 
Baron's dogs. Iloch. Elton and company. (Jus 
Williams, Avon Comedy 4. Adair and Dahn, Car 
rle Scott. Downey and Willnrd. Art Adair. John 
Irwin, and the klnodrome. GAYETY (O. V. 
Crawford, mgr.) The Crackerjacks proved to Im> 
all the name Implies. Bob Vanosten and John 
Hennlngs kept the audience in an uproar In both 
biirbttas. In the olio Charles and Anna locker, 
Hennlnga, I/«*wls and Helming*, and NBiepaid 
Camp pleased Immensely. The latter Is a clevr 
nomologist. He has a tine voice and If he would 
rejuvenate his gags or cut out the old ones be 

could Class among the best. STANDARD (Leo 

Rlchenbach. mgr.) —Miner's American Burlempiers 
Is this week's attraction. James Walthour. as 
slstcd by M"ls4 Florrle Princeton, In their racing 
Set, and a few good looking chorus girls, were 
the onlf redeeming features of the show. The 
olio w.i- made up principally of badly rendered II 
lustrated songs and time worn moving pictures, 
l'vhbntlv the show has run down with Its Western 
trip.-— -OLOR1 (H. F. tfeeker, mgr.) -Mackei 
and Mack, Elms Ell wood and company, Cleo De 
Vail, I*. E. Nelson, Lulu Besselman and Capt 
Sidney Ultima n furnished this week's program. 



SPRINGFIELD, MA8I. 

POLLS (J. C. Crlddle. res. mgr.) — Heading this 
week's bill are Staley and Blrbeck, who created a 
good impression with their transformation scene. 
The Ave Romanos gave a series of dauees on tbe 
whirlwind order. The sketch feature was pro- 
vided by Francis Owen and Minnie Hoffman. 
Matthew s and Ashley gave their skit, which went 
fair; the Golden Gate Quintet, colored singers and 
•lancers; Mllwood, a good clog dancer; the Rice 
Brothers, In bar work, and the electrograph 

rounded out the bill. NELSON (Z. T. Damon, 

mgr.; -The Black Crook, Jr., company presented a 
lively show which abounds with musical numbers. 
The vaudeville bill Included the La Sella troupe of 
-Trmbnrs- and M-Htv De V-ere=- • (rood attendance. 

FRANK MDONALD. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (C. H. Plummer, mgr.) 

lli<- bill offered this week was fair lu sjM»ts 
Three Madcaps made a fair' Impression. Johnson 
and Weils, colored entertaluera, well received. 
Maxsmith Duo, in an acrobatic and Juggling act 
noon unsupported ladders, presented an act which 
was novel and entertaining. Spook Minstrels re- 
ceived with great applause. Bart Howard and 
Leona Bland seem to please the audience. Lew 
Hopkins would Improve his monologue if he got 
some new stuff instead of using that of other 
artists. Prof. Bristol's Ponies took well. Pic- 
tures close the show. Next week, Gardner Crane 
and company, Tom I»udotis, Five Columbians, 
Hayes and Healy. NOTE. — The management of 
the Bast able Theatre advertised to show the pic- 
tures of the O'Brien and Fltzslmmoim tight at 
the Sunday night concert, but were prevented 
by the police. SAM FREEMAN. 

TOPEXA, KAN. 

NOVELTY (A. II. Hagan, mgr.)— The cold 
weather and snow (lurries have to some extent In- 
terfered and lessened the attendance at the vaude- 
ville houses in tlila city; nevertheless the Novelty 
is doing good hnslnss. Lewis and Lake made a 
hit with their turn last week. Week 18, Dick 
Gardner and Anna Revery, musical act, are com- 
pelled to respond to numerous encores; Brumager 
and Clark go well; Bence and Allar received their 
share of applause: pictures close.— — STAR (L. M. 
Gorman, mgr.) — This is the twelfth week of the 
Gaiety stock company and business continues good. 
In about four weeks Mr. Gorman leaves for Lin- 
coln. Neb., to take charge of a new theatre there. 

CRAWFORD (Crawford & Kane, nigra.).— 

Week IS, the Five Hewetts, musical act. well re- 
ceived. Varno and Valdare and the Gllmore stock 
company get liberal applause. The Btock company 
goes on the road March 2f». NOTE.— O. C. Kelly 
of the Topeka Street Railway informs me that 
no manager has vet been selected for the theatre 
at Vlnewood Park, which Is expected to open 
May 0. Many new attractions will be presented. 

LOUIS II. FRIEDMAN. 



TORONTO, ONT. 
SHEA'S (J. Shea, mgr.)— Lent Is making busi- 
ness only fair at most of the houses, this one in- 
cluded. Katie Barry made a hit with her char- 
acter songs; Callahan and Mack received a warm 
welcome; the Kauffmaii Troupe gave a marvelous 
exhibition of fancy bicycle riding; Emma Francis 
and her Arab Picks were a welcome novelty; Henry 
Atkinson, Alfred Arnessen and Burbon and Brooks. 

with the klnetograph, completed the bill. STAR 

IP. W. Stair, mgr. 1— Hie Kentucky Belles did 
well during the week. Reld and Gilbert, In "Mur- 
phy's Mistakes," were the candy. Pleasing spe- 
cialties were given by Four Rrothers Melvlns, 
who were the leaders In the olio; Century Comedy 
Four. Gras and Graham, Ilorton and company, 
Olhsnn and Walton. GRAND.— The Four Mor- 
tons. In "Breaking Into Society," drew large busi- 
ness. HARTLEY. 



TRENTON. N, J. 

TRENT (Ed Reutoii, mgr.)--Plll for week March 
10 opened with Klein and Clifton, eccentric sing- 
ers and dancers; fair A one-act farce, entitled 
"For Reform, " by Hugh Stanton and Florence 
Modena, took well Walters and Prottty, singers 
and travesty stars; good, 'in the Swim," a spec- 
tacular novelty of twelve people, was good; cos- 
tuming fair. Zingarl Trio, gypsy vocalists, best of 
the kind this season. Bert Leslie and Robert Dai- 
ley. In a short skit; good. Steve Hogan, a study 
In slang, was certainly there. Darns Bros., Euro- 
pejin acrobats; good. The show concluded with 
the hlogrnph. Next week's bill Includes Davis, 
Maeauley and company, presenting "Pais;" Mary 
Norman, monologue ; Three Lelgbtons, Rappo Sis- 
ters. Nettle Vesta. Walter C. Kelly, Paul Stephens 
and blograph. II. B. HEATH. 

TROY, N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (W. H. Graham, res. mgr.)— Week 
111, bill includes Richard Golden In monologue, suc- 
cessful; Eight Vassar (Jlrls. attractive; John Hy- 
ams and Iiella Mclntyre. sketch; "Two Hundred 
Wives," get a royal welcome. Ryan and Rich- 
tleid in "Mag Haggerty's Fa.ther." got many 
laughs. Ray Cox. dialect comedienne, well re- 
ceived: Tanakaa, Japanese acrobats, clever, the 
Pryrtjra, musical learn, deter; AlllnPs monkey 
shows careful training. Pictures (lose the show. 
— -ROYAL (W. H. Buck, res. mgr.) Irwin's 
big show, to fair houses. With a good olio and 
tWO burlesques, "The Only Pebble on the Beach" 
and "The Wives of the Sultan." Week ft!. "The 
Devil's Daughter." J. J. M. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

CHASE (Ml** H. Wlndti. I.I DcWItt. mgr.) — 
Mattel MeMnley Is the headlluer of a rather 
strong bill She was w*il received, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jimmy Bony, In a sketch. Introduced some very 
clever sp-. laities pi'i.s Brothers, hand to hand 
acrobats, fair Tin Arlington Fmir, In voeal and 
dancing speclati »ery uood. Waterburv 

Rrothers and remix, in a musical sketch, have 
not Improved mu< ■ Julius Tanner gave some 
very good in! 1 • if noted actor*. Macy and 

Hall 1 • I'd 4 very clever sketch entitled "A 

Tlmelv \ > g." They were well received. 

THE MAN IN BLACK. 



i8 



VARIETY. 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



WILLIAM MORRIS 



AAA 




♦ ♦ ♦ 



AAA 



♦ ♦ ♦ 




HOLLAND BUILDING 

1440 BROADWAY, CORNER 40th STREET 

CHICAGO OFFICEt 167 DEARBORN STREET 

Will open April 15th with staff from my New York Office. 
JESSE L. LA8KY, Mgr. (formerly with Henry B. Harris). 

BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY THE FOLLOWING 
LEADING VAUDEVILLE THEATRES. 



»»f 



P. G. Williams' Colonial. 
P. G. Williams' Orpueum. 
F. G. Williams' Albambra. 
P. O. Williams' Novelty, Bklyn. 
P. G. Williams' Gotham, liklyn. 

P. G. Williams' Manhattan 
Beach. 

P. G. Williams' Bergen Beach. 

Henry Myers*, Doric, Yonkers. 

Henry Myers*, Atlantic City. 

Henry Myers', Doric, Camden. 

Keeney's, Brooklyn. 

Trent Theatre, Trenton. 
Morrison's, Kockaway. 
Henderson's, Coney Island. 
Delmllng's, Kockaway. 
International, Chicago. 



IIammer8tein's Victoria. 
I lamtnerstein's Roof Garden. 
S. Z. Poll's, New Ilaven. 
S. & Poll's. Hartford. 
S. Z. Poll's, Worcester. 
B. Z. Polls, Springfield. 
S. Z. Poll's. Bridgeport. 
S. Z. Poll's, Waterhury. 
S. Z. Poll's, Jersey City. 
S. Z. Poll's, Scranton. 
S. Z. Poll's, Wilkes Bane. 
Sheedy's, Fall River. 
Sheedy's, Newport. 
Hathaway's, New Bedford. 
Hathaway's, Lowell. 
Hathaway's, Brockton. 



r. r. Proctor's 23d 8t 

F. P. Proctor's 5th Ave. 

F. F. Proctor's 58th St. 

F. F. Proctor's llifttn St. 

F. F. Proctor's. Newark. 

F. F. l'roctor's, Albany. , 

P. P. Proctor's, Troy. 

Wlliner A Vincent, Utlca. 

Wilmer A Vincent, Reading. 

Wilmer & Vincent, A lien town. 

Weber & Rush, Binghamton. 

Weber A Rush, Schenectady. 

11. II. I.auiklii's, Toledo. 

11. 11. Lamkin's, Dayton. 

Auditorium, Lynn. 

I. C. Mlshler, 11th Ave. Opera 

House, Altoona, Pa. 
I. C. Mlshler. New Family Thea- 
tre, Johnstown, Pa. 



12 WEEKS IN NEW YORK CITY WITHOUT A REPEAT, 12 



Telephones: 953-954-955 Bryant 



Cable Address: Will morris 



The Stars 1 Hea dquarter s for Vaudeville 

W. L. LYKENS' VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

31 WEST 31st STREET, MEW YORK 



Tel. 3417 Bryant- Cable. "Control." New York. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
HOLLAND BUILDING. 

BENTHAM 

ST. JAMES BUHL, 26th ST. and BROADWAY 

• Phone 2648 Madison 8<j. NtW YORK 

BORNHAUPT % ES!? k ™ H " 

bt. James Bldg. Tel. 4554 Mud. So,., New York. 

IDA CARLE 

St. Jamaa Building 

SOLE BOOKING AGENT FOR 

Dollle Bell's Dancing Troupes 

Smurtest Ibincliig Girls In England. SIX EM- 
PIRE GIRLS on tour In America. EIGHT PHI- 
MOSES on tour In AUSTRALIA. POPPIES (8) 
and other Troupes open after April 



CHAS. ESCHERT 

with Al Sutherland. St. James Building. 
Booking only good acta. 



New York Representative 

Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 

AL. IMAYBR 

VAUDEVILLE AGENT 

Room 803, St. James Building 
B'way and 26th Street. New York 

Tel.. 3847 Madison. 



H. B. MARINELL1 



FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS 85 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Tel., 4967 Madison 
B. A. 



Cable, Mysrsba 

e. s. 



MYERS KELLER 

GENERAL VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 

31 West 3 1 st Street, New York 

Pitrot&Girard 

International Vaudeville Agents. 
1265 Broadway, New York 



Tel.. 4615 Msdlson. 



Boohing Acts Every Day. 



FELIX 



JANES E. 



Reich & Plunked 

t"f: new firm. 

Suite 1024. St. James Building 

'Phone, 2632 Madison Sq. 

Alex. Sift 

VA UDEVILLE AGENT 

Booking Foreign and Native Acts. 



ST. JAMES BUILDING, 



NEW YORK. 



NEW YORK 

Cahit, 

"Helfersich" 



PARIS 



LONDON 



Cable, 

"UptodatS Paris" 



Cable. 

'Bruvisslmo---LorKl"n' 



St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway, 
'ifclepbone, 2463 Madison. 



Anything There's a Dollar In 

JACK LEVY 

140 West 42d St. INew York 

YOU CAN BE BOOKED 

ALBERT SUTHERLAND 

VAUDEVILLE BOOKINGS 

Fhone s-.'m.'i Madison St. James Building 



PASTOR'S 

14th St., near Third Ave. Continuous Performance. 

Week of March 26th. 
CASINO COMEDY FOUR 

JOHNSON. DAVENPORT A LOLELLO 
LeRoy & Woodford Be-Anos 

Tno. F. Clark 3 Musical Monarcbs 

Huston & Dallas The Brodys 

SPFXIAL FEATURE— STINSON & MERTON 

Siddons Brothers 

And as Extra Attraction 

LITTLE GARY OWEN & CO. 




W 

E 
E 
K 



8th AVE. 

London 
Gaiety Girls 



E BOWERY p 

Merry Jj 

S_ Burlesquers 

The Original Horns of / H 

Amateur NlatltS L U 




GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 

Subscribe now 



and be sure of 



VARIETY 



V 



HAMMEISTEIN'S THEATRE 
■ CTORIA VARIETIES 

Next Week i&giXS&m Mar. 26 

Prices, 23c, 50c, 73c A $1 00. Mat. Every Day, 25c A 50c 

NEXT WEEK 

First Time Here. Late Principal Feature with 
"Babes aud the Baron" Company, 

Mr. FRED WALTON & (0. 

The Toy Soldier, 
Producing a Unique Fantasy. 'CISSY'S DREAM." 

FRANK BUSH 

New and Original Stories 

First Time Here, 

MI88 DAISY HARCOURT 

English Serln-Conilc. 

MEERS BROTHERS 
Direct from the Hippodrome. 

MR. JUNIE McCREE AND COMPANY 
Presenting "THE DOPE FIEND." 

First Time Here. 
CABARATE 8 ORIGINAL D0O CIRCUS 

WOOD AND RAY 

Comedians. 

RANIER AND OAUDIER 
Singers and Dancers. 

40— HUNGARIAN BOYS' BAND— 40 

Direct from Budapest, Hungary. 

NEW VITAGRAPH VIEWS 




GREATER N.Y. CIRCUIT 




LONDON "MUSIC HALL" 

C7>e Great English Vaudeville Paper (WeeKJy) 

401 STRAND. W. C. 

American Representative— Miss Ida M. Carle, Room 708, St. Tames Building, where a 
fi-e of papers can be seen and advertisements will be received 



WATERBURY, CONN. 

JACQUES (W. J. Fltspatrtck. mgr.)— This 
week's bill Is below the average, the only redeem- 
ing features being the Itelff Brothers In a sin.,' 
lug and dancing act and Smith and Fuller in 
their well known musical turn. Both these act* 
were well received. The other acts were tho 
Red Haven Cadets, Mason, Kelly and company, 
Spaulding. Allen and Le Croix and Adnmlul ami 
Taylor. The pictures were a hit, closing the 
show. Attendance was below par. 

ARTHUR H. McKECHNIK. 



Pesehkoff Troupe of Russian Dancers; pictures 

<iose the hill; business good. GRAND OPERA 

HOUSE (J. K. Baylls. res. mgr.).— The Little 
Egypt Big Extravaganza Company; fair business; 
performance very bad. NOTE. — Harry B. Les- 
ter received a forty word telegram from Mr. Co- 
han's attorney to stop his Impersonation of Cohan 
and using the Grand Old Rag or they would take 
action. PITRO. 



WICHITA, KAN. 

BIJOU (Carle E. Olson, mgr.).— Grace Powell, 
singing and dancing comedian, opened the show 
and was good; Ethel Mayhell sang an Illustrated 
song; The Powells in sensational contortion act 
were the best ever seen here; Tegge and Daniels 
In German- American comedy were well received. 

Bijoigraph closed with good pictures. NOTE. 

— The Three Dees, who were booked at this thea- 
tre this week, did not come or' even cancel. 

LYRIC (Cox A Wise. mgrs.). — Motion pictures 
opened show; Stanley and Alleen. Juvenile com- 
edy; Illustrated song by George Renshaw; Norton 
and Perkins, comedy playlet, "It's Great to be 
Crazy." Lyrlcscope closed. A. C. RACE. 



Y0NKER8, N. Y. 

DORIC (Henry Myers, mgr.) — House was crowd 
ed on Monday und those present enjoyed an ex- 
cellent performance. Edwards and Kernell, n 
comedy sketch team, pleased. Bertie Ilerron is 
as clever alone as she was with Wayburn's Min- 
strel Misses. The Elite Musical Four went very- 
strong. Mr. and Mrs. Allison, one big laugh. 
Charlotte Parry Is a wonderfully clever change 
artist and a good actress. She could, however, 
improve on her support. Casino Comedy Four 
went strong, good singing and good comedy. All 
and PeyFer. acrobats pleased. The Dorlcscope 
showed a good picture. Business good. Next 
wt ek, Grace Fields and company, in Woodland 
Girls. ELZIE. 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 

DOCKSTADER'S GARRICK (W. L. Dockstader. 
mgr.)— Week March 19. Frederick, wire artist, 
good: John and Bertha Gleason and Fred Houlihan, 
dancing and music, well received; Sam Edwards 
in s talking act made good; Mr. and Mrs. Perkins 
FNher In "The Half Way House" had several re- 
calls; Ethel Robinson, songs, was well received; 
Catherine Hayes and Sabel Johnson's new act, 
"Dream of Baby Days," has some new features 
and went big; narry Booker and James F. 
Corbley, "The Walking Delegate," made a hit; , 



Y0UNG8T0WN, OHIO. 
GAYETY (Jos. W. Wess. mgr.)— This week Al 
Reeves' Beauty Show. Excellent company and 
business. The feature of the show Is a reprodnc 
tlon of the Chadwlck trial. Week March 20. The 
World Beaters. CHARLES R. BROWN. 



YORK. PA. 
PARLOR (Wm. Pvle. prop, and mgr.)— Butler 
and Lemar, "A Swell Reception." fine. Edward 
K. Cassady. Illustrated songs, strong; Irene La 
Tour and her clever dog "Zara," prove the fea- 
ture, winning out strong. Tony Baker, good; the 
Astalres could be better. The klnetorrsnh clones 
Capacity nightly. "TRIXIB." 



VARIETY. 



19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



COMEDY JUGGLERS 



HUSTON, 




8c CO 



THIS WEEK, AMPHION, BROOKLYN 



NEXT WEEK, PASTOR'S 



#*. J. Theodore Murphy 

W& A WISE CINK ■ W 

A M Principal Comedian AL. REEVES CO. 



Principal Comedian 

WOULD CONSIDER SUM ENGAGEMENTS 



GlLDAY 

FEBRUARY 26— NOVELTY. BROOKLYN. 
MARCH 6— P0LI8, WATERBURY, CONN. 
MARCH 12— AUDITORIUM. LYNN, MAS8. 
MARCH 19— HAIHAWAY S, LOWELL. 
MARCH 26— PROCTOR'S 23D STREET. 
APRIL 2— PROCTORS 58TH STREET. 
APRIL 9— PROCTOR'S. ALBANY. 
APRIL 16— PROCTOR'S 125TH STREET. 




APRIL 23— PROCTORS, NEWARK. N. J. 
APRIL 30— POLI'S. NEW HAVEN. 
MAY 7— PROCTORS, TROY, N. Y. 
MAY 14— POLI'S. HARTFORD. 
MAY 21— SPRINGFIELD. 
MAY 28— WORCESTER.. 
JUNE 4— BRIDGEPORT. 



KLEIN-OTT BROS. & NICHOLSON 

tr BOOKING MOW FOR NEXT SEASON .m 
SPECIAL FEATURE-FENBERG STOCK CO. 
MARCH 26— YONKERS, N. Y. APRIL. 2— NEWBURG, N. Y. 

APRIL 16— H. & B., BROOXLYN. APRIL 23— PASTOR'S. 

(MYKRS & KELLER. Agents.) APRIL 30— H. & 8., N. Y. CITY. 

H RETURN IN VAUDEVILLE AFTER AN ABSENCE OF TWO YEARS. ~ ' """ 

Fox LaVeen • Cross 



Management JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42c! St. 
Something NEW goon. Will let you know toon as copyrights are granted. 

HAVE YOUR CARD IN VARIETY 







"HURLY BURLY COMIQUES" 

Week MARCH 26th, GOTHAM, BROOKLYN 

Presenting our LATEST NOVELTY. A strong attraction in Acrobatic Comedy 

PC*. ADDRESS. 46 WEST 24th STREET, NEW YORK 



AN ALL STAR CAST 

IS THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE 

NEW YORK INQUIRER 

IT INCLUDES 

JOHN W. KELLER 

WILLIAM C. NICHOLAS _ 

HAMILTON L. MARSHALL 

CHARLES ALFRED BYRNE 

"CHOLLY KNICKERBOCKER" 
R. E. RAYMOND 

CHARLES E. TREVATHAN 

LEANDER RICHARDSON 
and others 

The Publication, issued Sundays, treats of Society, Wall Street 
Politics, Racing, Sports, Automobiling, Theatres and miscellaneous 
matters and it is essentially 

"A Smart Paper for Smart Per son s" 

Knickerbocker Theatre Annex, - New York 



PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 

ASK THE STARS, SOME FOR 
WHOM I'VE WORKED. 

Thot. 

Seabrooke, 

Jeanette Lowrie, 

Mabelle Oilman, Irene Bent- 

ley, Annie Irish, Edna Goodrich, Eltingn, 

Nell* Bergen. Elfie Fay, Mrs. Yeamans, Estelle 

Wentworth, Amy Ricard, Cherry Simpson, Eddie Leonard, etc 




Vift/ETV 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADINO OP 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 



1-2 Inoh single column, 

1 Inoh " 

1 -2 Inoh double oolumn, 

1 Inoh " 



AT FOLLOWING RATES: 



• S2.00 monthly, Net 
4 00 " " 

. 4.00 M " 

7.60 " " 



— BEST PLACES TO STOP AT — 



31 West 31st Street, New York I 






answering advertisements 



Professional Kates. $1 Double; $1.25 Single. 

TUB BERKSHIRE HOTEL 

James Ktrnnss, Prop. 
721 727 Franklin St.. Reading. Pa. 
Four blocks from Orphean Theatre. One-half 
block from stupe entrance to PI. Inn Theatre. One- 
half Mock from Franklin St. Depot. 



Professional Headquarters 
THE BRIDGE HOTEL 

Bowery and Delancey Sts., N. Y. City, 2 doors 
above Miner's Theatre. Elegant furnished rooms. 
Rnoma reserved by letter. Horn and Drlacoll. 
Proprietors; Wm. J. Rellly. Manager. 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 
UHE VAJVDE'R'BILG 

COMVtMEMTLY LOCATED 



HURTIO # 5EAnO>J PRESENT 

ERNEST HOGAN 

de unbleached American) 

■• "RUFUS RASTUS" 

Season 1808—07 

kindly mention Variety; 



Hole 




(FORMERLY HOTEL LANCE). 
Gift WORM. Manager 

Market and 15th Streets, ST. LOUIS 

BEST U$k* LUNCH AFTER SHOW 

BEST PROFESSIONAL HOUSE. 

Professional'* Headquarters 
MILLER'S HOI EL American Pla,r\) 

S. K. corner Tenth and Race Sts., Philadelphia. 
A new and up to-dute hotel, home comforts. Rutes 
$1.00 and $2.00 per day. Special Bute* to Pro 
feaalrinala. Harry C MIlbT, Pfnp 



111:1.1.0, c.vjuwv. 



HI 



T \ SGOTT 



t HVMI'loV |>\\.|\i, -II'VM Df AMIMtHA 

If subscribing u as per 
route" mail postal of any 
change to insure receipt. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



"THE HIT OF THE SEASON" 



CHARLES 





&C0 



■ h ■ nn v w wwi 

(OF EVANS & HOEY PARLOR MATCH FAME) in a One-Act Farce by George Arliss Called 

"IT'S UP TO YOU, WILLIAM" 

Packed houses and enthusiastic audiences at 
the Colonial endorse the critic's opinion, viz: 

"It was more than a success. It was a triumph of good acting, good management and good sense."— **»»«•* Tek g » P b 

WEEK MARCH 26, - — * & ORPHEUM THEATRE 



FRANCESCA REDDING 



in "Her Friend From Texas 

A FEW WEEKS OPEN— ASK ANY AGENT. 

Moxt — W Y O MIN G — Smmson 

A THREE THOUSAND DOLLAR PRODUCTION. 
Management SHERWOOD & SILER, Chicago 



ss 



— NOW IN VAUDEVILLE *-*-— 



MARSEILLES 

AMLRIG/WS LEADING NOVELTY GYMNAST 

presenting his unique conception *'/\ Puzzle In Black and White*' 

ADDRESS— WILLIAM MORRIS. 



CHARLOTTE COATE and LITTLE MISS SUNFLOWER 



COLISEUM, NEWARK 



Assisted by 
THIS SUNDAY) 



f\JW EHRLICH 

A Feature on Any VAUDEVILLE BILL 





IN f\ NEVA/ 

PROTEAN PL AV 

••The CRIMINAL" 

tfOWE-UBBT DUPREE 



Gorman Commdy 



At liberty 



JOS. 



J. w. 



Madden - Jess 

Irvvlte Offer* for Next Season 
Address care of Utopians, En Route 

Gartelle Bros. 

SKAT0RIAL1SM 

World and Kingston 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



IRENE LA TOUR 



AND HER 
CLEVER DOG 



ZAZA 



ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 
309 WEST 24th STREET, NEW YORK 

Margaret Webb 

OF HOLCOMBE. CURTIS & WEBB. 
March 26 — Empire, Paterson. 

JOE EDMONDS 

" Tl " SSgg*^* Vaudeville 

EDDIE SIMMONS 

% tail Bail j!Si££. 433 



will shortly 
appear 



AN ECCENTRIC NOVELTY ACT, 

The Be-Anos 

Now Booking for Next Season. 
MYERS & KELLER. 






FOR SALE 

WIGGINS FARM 



AdamS'Mack 

BURLESQUE MAGIC KEITH CIRCUIT 

Keith's, Philadelphia, week March 20. 

Yorkville Theatre to-morrow (Sunday). 



VIRGINIA 



BURTON & RANKIN 

In the" rt» JCAS VOLUNTEER" 
T. A. 8TERNAD. care West. Vaudeville Mjrr*.' At*. 



Author of 

"Keep a Little Cosy Corner in Your Heart for Me," 

"What the Brass Band Played," 

"Keep on the Sunny Side," etc. 

JACK DRISLANE 

Writing Successful Lyrics to 
Theo. Morse' ■ Successful Melodies. 



125 West 37th St. 



New York 



ART ADAIR 

CLOWN, "CLOWN." CLOWN. 

Musical Eccentric. Booked solid till Nov. 

Now on Kohl A Castle Circuit. 



BELL AND RICHARDS 

BLACKFACE COMEDY MUSICAL ARTISTS 

TIA/O NEVA/ "ELECTRIC" NOVELTIES 

BIG FEATURE ACT FOR ANY HOUSE: MASSIVE "ELECTRIC WAVE." A THOUSAND LIGHTS 
A MINUTE. LAST. AND NOT LEAST, "MIXOAPHON." THE MARVEL OF THE KNOW WORLD. 
MILLIONS OF ELECTRIC FLASHES A MINUTE. SAXOPHONES, CORNETS, ETC. 

p. S.— WATCH US "FLASH" TO EUROPE A FEW "GOOD OFFERS" NOW. 
APRIL 2 AND 9 OPEN. MYERS A KELLER, 31 W. 318T ST., N. Y. 



SHEPPARD CANP 

"THE MAM FROM GEORGIA" 



RADO s BERTRAM 

"THE NEW GIRL." 
Revised by Rae and Broche. 






CHERIDAH SIMPSON K | TT | E STEVENS 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 
205 W. s-tli St., New York. 



7 character dances and changes In 10 minutes 



TOM FULLAM, 1st Tenor 



ED CONVEY, 2nd Tenor 



Savoy Quartette 



URT LA ROSE, Baritone 



MAX CORDON, Bass 



FEATURE ACT 

With Al Reeves Beauty Show 

BIG HIT ON EASTERN WHEEL 

Invite offem for Season 1906-O7 

Address ED CONVEY, Mgr. En Route Al Reeves Co. 

REGARDS TO KMOCKERS 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



31 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



The 



DANCINC 



MITCHELLS 



Always playing the leading vaudeville 
theatres in America 



"HUMAN TOPS 



*r 



May Boley 

AND THE DASHING 

Polly Girus 



u 



AND THE GOMIGAU 

VILLAGE GUT-UPS 



If 



AS PRd8cNTdD IIN 

RICHARD GARLE'S 
Musical Comedy Triumph 

"The Maid and the Mummy" 

DIREGTIOM OP M. S. BEINTHAM 



Dave Marion 



IN 



Scenes from New York East Side Life 

" Is genuinely funny.'* — Chicot. 

* 

20 people in cast. Time of act, 20 minutes 

Address AL SUTHERLAND, St. James Building 



THE 2 




EERS 



PITTSBURGH CHRONICLE TELEGRAPH 

Tuesday, March 2<>, 1000. — "The 'iSvo lifers perform some wonderful feats on the slackwire. 
They ur" one of the greatest attractions in that lino over seen In Pittsburg." 

Week of March 26th, Hammentein'i, New YorK City 
LIONEL E. LAWRENOE, La to St ago Director New York Ihomtro 



cc 



PRE8ENT8 



RIALTO GIRLS 



19 



Introducing a Stage Rehearsal, showing with absolute fidelity the Other Side" of being 
a "Show Girl." Stage Hands, Orchestra, Audience, etc., ALL PART OF THIS ACT. 



m NORTON ^NICHOLSON 



Booked over the Orpheum, Anderson, Kohl 4 Castle 
circuits, beginning Nov., '06 



in "ELLA'S ALL RIGHT" 



Week March 26 Howard, Boston 



The Past Masters of German dialect comedians, 

ARTHUR H. KHERNS »• MEDORA COLE 

Presenting n farcical absurdity, "THE BARON." In Vaudeville. Address, Palace Hotel, Chicago. 



A REFINED STUDY IN HEBREW. 



Le 1VI AIRE and Le MAIRE 



LAUGHINGIZERS AND PARODISTS. 



JOE MORRIS 



.tt 



THC HEBREW WITH THE PIPES 



SPISSELL BROS.- MACK 

IN THEIR ORIGINAL ACROBATIC COMEDY 

"SCENES IN A CAFE" 




Electric 
Ballet 



With 3 VASSAR GIRLS 




ILLIE 
ESTON 



Imitator of Popular Actors. 

Address WM. MORRIS. 



Lulu Watts 



Staffing and Talklna; Comedienne 
In Vaudeville. 



WHALEN & WEST 

" WALK WITH ME" 

HAVE A FEW VACANT DATES IN MAY. ALL AGENTS. HOME ADDRES8, 239 E. 11TH STREET. 

CHAS. J. BURKHARDT 

"The Man with the Funny Slide" 

MANAGEMENT OF MR. I. H. HF.RK 

LOOK OUT FOR US NEXT SEASON 

THE ORIGINATOR OF THE MESSENGER BOY IN VAUDEVILLE! 

Al. W. Maddox, %* h Maybelle Melvin 




14 



PRESENTING THEIR UNIQUE CHARACTER SKETCH. 

AT THE STATION" 



"It \a hot tor to have t>oon a hit it. l.um than to never have lie< n :i hit ;it all." — (Quoted > Arthur Van. 

"Maddox arid Melvin present a very funny sketch entltlod 'At tlie Station." In which Maddoi lias 
about as ludicrous a make-ii|» as has been seen In Lynn for many days The act is a laugh all the wh> 
through and made a bi« hit."-- Lynn Paper. 

■OETCat^l %#CTI 1 ^ that we shall make a resolve each week! 
KLOULVLU First resolve 

RqsoIv d to make ANY audience laugh ! I 

Correspondents Wanted 

Wherever there is a Vaudeville or Burlesque Theatre 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



22 



VARIETY. 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Specially engaged for March 5, Washington, D. C; March xa, Baltimore; March 19, Philadelphia; then four weeks in New York City. 



THE 



CHARMING 
COMEDIENNE 



JEANETTE DUPRE 



At liberty commencing April 23. 



Permanent address Jeanette Dupre, Hotel Navarre, New York. 



ROSE WENTWORTH 

WAIT FOR THE NEW ACT 



CATHERINE 



SABEL 




Ir\ Their Big Scenic Novelty 

"A Dream of Baby Days" 



THE HEAVIEST ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



OPEN AT WILMINGTON WEEK OF MARCH 19th 



Ktlrr DnOSi 

America's Best Singing and Dancing Act 

POM CIRCUIT ASK WM. MORRIS 

A man who's wise will advertise 

And take this as a Hint 
There's not an actor on the stage 

Who doesn't liKe his name in print 



Jr^* except 



HOWARD AND NORTH 

Mr. Fred Karno's 00!% &>. 

"A Night in an English Music Hall" 

Manager, AI/P. REEVES. Agents, Wm. MORRIS and H.B. MARINBUJ 



HERZOG'S HORSES 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the property of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in J^ondon, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



THE GREAT HORSE SHOW 

MANUEL and JOSEPHINE HERZOC 

MARSHALL^ 



and his German assistant, HERR PAVL, fust returned from their successful tour of Europe. 

ADDRESS WILLIAM MORRIS 




LEVY 



Popular 
Morning 
Telegraph 
Artist 



Harry Corson Clarke 



ACCOMPANIED BY 



Margaret Dale Owen 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TIME FILLED 



JAMES THORNTON 

Owing to extensive booking has canceled 

European time 

Rhmrm2490 J Hmrlmm AddrOB*, 1*20 Fifth AVO., MOW York 



ED 




Better act than I ever saw you do. 



JAMES THORNTON 



LOUISE DACRE 

"THE HAPPY GIRL" 

AT LIBERTY SEASON 190607. 

For Burlesque or Faroe Comedy. Address Ra Route, Kay Foster i.v. 

HANSON and DREW 

IN THEIR ORIGINAL COMEDY ACT, ENTITLED 
"THE VILLAGE BILL POSTER" 

Carrying their own scenery (exterior). Copyrighted year 11*01 . Clans I>. XXC. No. 923. Written l»y John 

T. Hanson. Elaborated by .Tunie MeCree. 
Characters: Zeh Hilling. Bill Pouter, Opry House Manager, Treasurer. Property Man. ex Minstrel, Ma 

gleian, Juggler, and Town Conbtable, with the dignity of the town on his hands lohn T. Hanson 

Leading Lady and County Girl Maybe] Drew 



BROCKMAN, MACK 

"THE COUNT ON MOTHER'S ACCOUNT" 



BELMONT 

Booked until June 11th. It's a good act 




\ 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety 



VARIETY 



33 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



GRACE Von STUDDIFORD 

RETURNS TO AMERICA 

For aLimited Vaudeville Engagement 

PROCTOR'S 58TH STREET, MARCH 26TH 



/ 



ALEXANDER STEINER, Manager 












BESSIE VALD ARE'S 

TltO WE OF Cy CLISTS 

Smartest Dressed and Most Refined Bicycle Act Before the Public. 

ORPHEUM THEATRE, READING, FA., WEEK MARCH 26. 

VAUDLVILLL'S FAVOMTES 

dave GEN ARO AND BAILEY ray 

Assisted by EDDIE SIMMONS 

Will produce in the Month of May their new offering entitled: "TONY" 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, GHAS. 



IN THEIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS— CAPT. KIDD 



PER ADD., 31 CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N Y 



MRS. ANNIE YEAMANS 

^/IMD VAVGHTEP^ JENNIE 
DECEMBER. AND MAY in Vaudeville 









A Few Press Opinions of Bobby RAYMOND AND CLARK, Maggie Lee En Route N. Y. STARS 



Pittsburg Gazette, Oct. 23. 
Raymond and Clark are something wore than the 
rapid tire conversationalists, which they are ad- 
vertised. They are a pair of the best comedians 
on the variety circuit. Their Jokes are new, and 
yesterday at the Gaiety they kept their bearers 
convulsed with laughter as long as they remained 
on the stage. 



Providenoe Journal, Sept. 19. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid tire conversationalists, 
have an especially good turn. The man is partic- 
ularly clever and the woman sings some funny 
parodies. 



and Clark, rapid fire conversationalists, get off a 
number of sprightly local gags which keep the 
audience in a roar from the time they are on the 
stage until they retire. 



Kansas City World, Not. 87. 
Raymond and Clark, rapid tire conversationalists, 
sent some heulthy shots at the local police and 
the notorious union depot. This made a nit with 
the patrons. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, Oot. SO. 
The Olio acta are all hits. Raymond and Clark 
In their rapid tire conversation and clever parodies 
captured the laughing honors. The act went with 
a hurrah. 



Pittsburg Chronicle, May 16. 
Raymond and Clark have one of the beBt conver- 
sational turns ever given at the Academy. Their 
dialogue Is replete with local coloring. 



Holyoke Evening Telegram, Feb. 2. 
Raymond and Clark, billed as rapid tire conver- 
sationalists, lived up to their title, and the pair 
exchanged some of the brightest and wittiest 
repartees heard in the theatre this season. 



Baltimore Bun, May 2. 
Bob Raymond and Maggie Lee Clark have one of 
the best sketches seen at the house this season. 



Cincinnati Commercial, Oct. 30. 
Raymond and Clark were especially good. The 
Introduction of Mr. Raymond upon the scene In a 
most eccentric fall fairly convulsed fbe audience 
with laughter. 



Nashville Banner, Not. 7. 
The specialties are for the most part below the 
average seen at this house, though there are two 
which show up to excellent advantage. Raymond 



Springfield (Mass.) Daily News, Jan. 80, 1906. 

The hit of the show was scored by Raymond and 
Clark in a rapid tire conversational act that kept 
the audience laughing steadily while they were on 
the stage. They have a barrel of brand new stuff, 
all of which is bright and clever, and the few 
familiar Jokes that are put In are merely to give 
the audience a rest. 



Philadelphia Item, Oot. 15. 
Raymond and Clark were very pleasing In a 
singing and talking act. Their songs are catchy, 
and their witty sayings and Jokes set the audience 
Into roars of laughter who were loath to leave 
them off the stage. 



Variety. 
Telegraphed to same from Buffalo. 
Raymond and Clark are the best In the Olio. 
Their act received much favorable comment about 
town on account of the number of original sayings 
they have. An original act Invariably sets Buffalo 
talking. CI1AS. W. OOETZ. 



STUART BARNES 

DIRECTION GEO. HOMANS 

Carson 




THE MODERN ATHLETES 



DIRECTION OF P. J. CASEY 



ST. JAMES BUILDING 



MAY HOWARD 

America's Queen of Burlesque, En Route With Her Own Co. 



DIRECTION OF JAMES E FENNESSY 



AND STILL 
THEY COMB! 



RYAN AND RICHFIELD CO 



' #.00 Kcoieny's fooh " 

Produced at Tony Pastor's 
Theatre. May 23, 1901. 



(All by Will M. Cre»»sy.) Per. address 1\ O. Box 36, Ssyvllle. L. I., N. Y. 



" lie Honours mow" 

Produced at Hurtlg A Sea- 
Ofcon's Music Hall, Oct. 12, 
1908. 


" moo KODBm Recepiion " 

Produced at Shea's Theatre, 
Toronto, Can., Feb. 12. 1900. 



CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



AGENT, H. B. MAF/NFLL! 



Tom Moore 

'Best Singer of Coon Sonds in Vaudeville 

WEEK MARCH 26. COOKS, ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



IN A NEW ACT WRITTEN BY JOE WELCH 



JOSEPH 



K 



WATSOIN 



Signed for next season with Kraus' "20th Century Maids." 



THELITTLE HEBREW GENTLEMAN." 



Thanks to managers for kind offers 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Vajliity. 












i± 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



M O WATTS 

SEASON lOOfl RINOLINO BROS.— SEASON 1907 EUROPE 





. S. BENTHAM 



PRESENTS 



THE 



ORIGINAL TWEEDLEPUNCH 






OF 



"FLORODORA" 

JAS. A. KIERNAN & CO. 



PINISHINO SECOND SEASON SPECIAL FEATURE KEITH CIRCUIT 








Smart Songs 
and Costumes. 



An Incomparable Act 



E 



A Neat and 
Original Act. 





IN 



JAMES HORAN'S 

Latest Musical Comedy Vaudeville 

'•Taming the Beast 



If 



"Six Empire Girls 

VAUDEVILLE'S* NEWEST SENSATION 

DIRECT FROM LONDON. FIRST AMERICAN APPEARANCE. 

EN ROUTE "DREAMLAND BURLESQUERS" FOR 10 WEEKS. 
For Open Time, Address 
CHARLES BELL, Mmnmg.r En Routm or Car* of VMRIE1Y 



DAN 



CMAS. 



AVERY and HART 

Greatest Colored Team in Vaudeville 
ASKL 1/1//VI. MORRIS 

THE SINGING SENSATION! 

MAUDE ROCKWELL 



VAN & ilADDOX, Props, and Mgrs. 
NOT a Vaudeville Act— BIT a Production! Beware Pirates— We Are Protected ! 

P. S. While others continue to fertilize the pasture of their Intellect with our Drains we will try 
to be the winners. — "Shortfellers." . 

Green & Werner 

THE ORIGINAL 

BABES IN THE JUNGLE 



Address W/IVX. MORRIS 



minhie JEROME and WHITESIDE pearl 

A SISTER ACT DIFFERENT FROM OTHERS. 
Address International Theatrical Co., 67 S. Clark St., Chicago. 

CHARLES B. LAW LOR 

AUTHOR AND COMPOSER, PRESENTING 

GHARLES 15. LAWLOR and DAUGHTERS 

CHARLES MABEL ALICE ~ 

Author "Sidewalks of New York," "The Mick Who Throw the Brick," "The Best la the 
House Is None Tdo Good for Rellly," "How Can Things be on the Lerel When 
the World IS Round?" AND OTHERS. 

Character, Comedy and Descriptive Vocal Sketch t*. 4313 Riverside 



Operatlo Soprano 



New York Shortly 



Ad rats CHRIS 0. BMOWN, Sixth Floor. 67 S. Clark Strtet, Chicago 

DIXON & ANGER 

"The Baron and His Friend" 

In Preparation, a New Act — The Newest in Vaudeville 

ST. ONCE BROS. 

We Have Wheels Too, But We Ride Ours 

Direction of the US Director, P. J. CASEY, St. James Bid*. 

The Famous and Original 

GRAND OPERA TRIO 

IN THE PRISON SOENE FROM "FAUST" 

Booking Agent. WM. MORRIS 



ADAMS 



AND 



DREW 



RESENTING 



"A BOGUS CHAUFFEUR" 

MANAGEMENT AL SUTHERLAND, ST. JAMES BL1K1. 

MARCH 26TH— GAIETY THEATRE, BROOKLYN, HYDE'S COMEDIANS. 



TNE 

PERFECT 

MAN 



CARL VICTOR, 

It* CLASSIC AND MUSCULAR FOSES AHD FEATS OE STRENGTH 

Pittsburg Tress wild: "An extremely Interesting and pretty performance." Youngstown Vindicator: 
"Carl Victor is a surprise. No one In town should miss him." 

BIO SUCCESS ON THE KEITH CIRCUIT. For Time. Address 8. K. HODODON 



EUGENE WILLIE 

Howard & Howard 

SINGERS AND COMEDIANS 

Willie— Original Hebrew Messenger Boy. Eugene- Writer of all parodies need In act. 



LEONA THURBER 

4 BLACKBIRDS 

Managers and Agents invited to looK its over 

DIRECTION M. S. BENTHAM 



WEEK MARCH 2ft— KEITHS, PROVIDENCE. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention V amity. 



VARIETY 



25 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



W. 



C. YOUNGSON'S 

SPOOK MINSTRELS 

Booked Solid Until July 2 by WILLIAM MORRIS The Sensational Novelty 

Just returned after successful engagement on Orpheum Circuit 

WILFRED CLARKE I Eddie Leonard 



A TRIUMPH 

IN 

VAUDEVILLE 



Assisted by MISS THCO CARtW <& CO. 

Presenting His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE and WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 

ADDRESS, LAMBS' OLUB 

BIG HIT IN VAUDEVILLE 

Sam Collins 

Lmtm mi Jm* Wsbor's All-Stmr Cast 

Per. Address, 186 8th St., Clmhurst, L. I. 'Phone 221 Newtown 



The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 



AND HER 



A Positive Hit In VaudevlUe with 

*^y* DUE AM IJV 7>IJTIELA.Sn>" 

Assisted by the SHARP BROTHERS. Address: JACK LEVY, 140 West 42d St., N. Y. 

"»( INNESS & RYAN »••«•> 



Booked Solid. 



CONVERSATIONALISTS AND SINGKUS. Agt. Jo Paige Smith. 



CHARLES ROBINSON 

America's Famous Character Comedian 

FEATURED WITH THE BIO SUCCESS 

"THE GOLONIAL BELLES" 



/n/lNAGEMENT 



CAMPBELL dt DREW 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK GARFIELD 
JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIQHE 
Accompanist 




W. L. LYKENS, Manager 

Staged by ED, ROGERS 



PRANK 



LOUISE 



BYRON 



AND 



LANGDON 



confess "THE DUDE DETECTIVE" 

NOW PLAYING THE KEITH CIRCUIT. PERMANENT ADDRESS, 204 EAST 52D ST., N. Y. CITY. 

THE NEW ONE 

URL V I Elf All I AND Oil. Parisian street singers 

"THANKSGIVING" By EDMUND DAY Including JOSEPH DUMOIND. Violin Virtuoso 

FOUR PEOPLE, 8PECIAL 8CENERY. ALL THAT'S RURAL. I MARCH t8— MOORE'g, PORTLAND. ME. 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



■ ■■ a musical wumcuicui i.iiuucu ■■ 

Accidents Will Happen" 




James B. Rena 

Donovan - Arnold 

The King of Ireland £ CO- Queen of Vaudeville 

In their Laughing Success. "TWENTY MINUTES ON BROADWAY." Booked 8olid. ASK MORRIS. 

3 DUMONDS 



26 




VARIETY 




^ 


REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



BOOKED 
SOLID UNTIL 
MAY 6, 1907 



Gardner aos Stoddard 

management JACK LEY/Y, 140 lA/est -4<2d Street 



J ewelTs M annikins 

A revelation in statecraft, with a reputati n encirclin| the earth. 

World's champion manipulators of wooden actors and actresses 

The Big Agfiit — P. J. CASEY. St. .Imiun Bldg. 

Harry La. Rose Co. 

"THE SAILOR AND THE HORSE" 

See William Morris 

Mr. a.d Mrs. GARDNER CRANE »« GO. 

PRESENTING THEIR NEW PLAY. 

"A YANKEE'S LOVE FOR DIXIE." 

BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JUNE 1st. 

JOHN GRIEVES 



OFFERING HIS 



"Parisian Belles" Co. En route 



THE BEST COMPANY ON THE ROAD 



HILLS* WILSON 

COMEOUNS, SINGERS and DANGERS 

Week of March 26, HURTIC * SEASON'S Address WM. MORRIS 

D'Estelle Sisters 

CLEVEREST OF ALL DANCING DOLLS 

Per. Address, 242 W. 43d St., N. T. City. OPEN AFTER MAY 29. 1906. 



RO LUCKING 



HILDA THOMAS 



B. C. Whitney's 
SHOW GIKL CO. 



COMEDIENNE 



HONEST! I'M A REGULAR COMEDIAN! ASK THE GREAT HENRI FRENCH. 
"TUB AMBITIOUS ASSASSINATOR OF MELANCHOLIA." 

"BILLY WALSH" 



Who TeJks and Sings 

BOOKINO FOR NEXT SEASON. ALL AGENTS. 



"A WARFiELD IN PETTIO OATS." -Town Talks, San Francisco 

LILLIAN SHAW 

Always have made g<xxi. but now doing hotter than ever. 
APRIL 2— IMPERIAL, BROOKLYN. IWked by MYERS & KELLER. 



JAMES 



THE BRADYS 



KITTY 



Originators of Singing and Bag Punohlng with Music 

PASTOR'S, WEEK MARCH 26 




KATIE 
BARRY 



Keith circuit until June. 
Booked by n. S. Bentham. 




BAR*V 



OTTO PARIS, 1st Tenor. 



HENRY PARIS. Baritone. 



The White City Quartette 



March 19 — Grand O. II., Indianapolis. 
March 26— Majestic, Chicago. 
April 2— Hayniarket, Chicago. 



April 9— Columbia, St. Louis. 

April 16 — Open. 

April 23— Temple, Detroit. 



ALL OrEN AFTER. 



WM. PARIS. 2nd Tenor. 



CEO. DONALDSON. Bnsso. 



TO 




H EAR N 



(( 



LITTLE PLAY— BIG HIT. 



THE BENEDICTION" 

Preaented by FRANCIS OWEN. MINNIE HOFFMAN (St COMPANY 

Now on Poll's Circuit. Springfield, Mass.. Week March 19. WM. MORRIS IS THE AGENT. 

"THE APT BEAUTIFUL" 

CARTER & BLUFORD 

PRETTIEST AND BE8T GOWNED ACT IN VAUDEVILLE. NOW PLAYING KEITH CIRCUIT. 





ros, 



Melvin 



The Most Marvellous Qymnsstlc Act In the World Accomplishing Seemingly Impossible Feets 



"THE LAZY JUGGLER" 

Acknowledged by SIME to be the Funniest Juggling Act in 
America. 

m MAY BELFORT 

A Refined and Artistic Rendering of Stories in Song 

THAT'S ALL. MR. GEO. HOMANS, Manager 



HARRY THOMSON 



No. 149 Eldert St. 



Brooklyn 



"THE MAN WITH THE GOODS" 

THE ORIGINAL 

Three Madcaps 

NINA AMY PANSY 



BOOKED SOLID 



PANSY 

Address AL. HAVER, St. James Building 



When answering advertisements kindly mention V""kty. 





VARIETY 




*7 


REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 


. 


REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 


> 






Address William Morris 

EMMA FRANCIS 



• h °e? Arabian 



IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION OF M. S. BCNTHAM 

RICE & PREVOST 

IN 

BUMPTY BUMPS 



Arthur J. 



Miss Grace 



McWATERS .... TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VftUDBVILLB" 

MAJESTIC MUSICAL FOUR 

HIGH CLASS COMEDY MUSICAL ACT 

AT LIBERTY FOR NEXT SEASON 
Tills suson FEATURE 1ST MEW VORKSTMS 

Gruet&Gruet 

BLACK FACE COMEDIANS 

En Route Williams' "Ideals" Co 

ItltlT, ACHOBATIC | NOVELTY Ml 

Faust Trio 

V. Jerome. bottle Preemont. J. Rets, 
with "New York St rs." 

OPEN JUNE 3d AND LATER 

AAA**** 939 It. 156th St.. N. V. *Mty 




F. Daly Burgess 

GOMEDIAN 

*nd Hie Dos. - f" I IN IN EG A IN 

In Vaudeville 

THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

FJOE AJU VV1/%RI< 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week March 12, Portland, Me. 

ED.F.REYNARD 



Bush Gordon 

"HURLY BURLY COMIQUES" 
In Vaudeville 



Address All First- 
Class Agents 



Season 

Season 

Season 
Season 
Season 
Season 



Ventriloquist 

1901-2 — Great Lafayette Show. 

1902 « I Primrose and Docks tader's 

iw*-o ^ Minstrels and Empire Show. 
1903-4 — Orpheum Show. 
1904-6 — Touring England. 
1905-0— Touring America. 
1900-7 — Orpheum Show. 

Ezoluaive Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 



HILL AND SYLVANY 

Address WM. MORRI8. 
March 19 — New Bedford, Mass. 



March 26 — Lynn, Muss. 



Gardner iwincent 

"WINNING A QUEEN" 

BooKed Solid for 3 Years 

NANON JACQUES 

Singing Comedienne 

WILL/AM MORRIS, Aptnt 



THE FAMOUS 

Colby Family 

Orpheum Circuit until June Oct. 1 , '06, until 
April, 1 S07, booked solid. See Morris. 6 W. 
28th St., N. Y. City, or Wm. H. Colby, per route 



CHAS. B. 



LILLY B. 



BILLIE RITCHIE 



ii 



The Drunk" 



A Night in an English Music Hall 



EXPOSITION FOUR 

(3 ALEXANDERS and BRADY) 
TH 

BEST 

IN 




LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 

JACK INORWORTH 

Peasants Trie GOLLGG5 BOY 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloquist and 

The Dancin* Doll 

In Europe for One Year. 
Playing Return Dates Everywhere 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. 0., 
London. England. 

BURROWS-TRAVIS CO. 

in their up-to-the-minute Comedy Act 



THE PLATES 



WAITER DANIELS 

IMPERSONATOR OF NOTED ACTORS. 

With make up and changes in view of audience* 
Chicot in Variety Raid: "Was called back three 
times, in a clever bit of acting." 




Cha's 



(TWO) 



Alice 



Shrodes 



RENTED 



ALICE 



HATTIB 



THE FLOODS 



and Do* "Trlxle." 
Novelty Globe and Unsupported Ladder Act. 



"SNITZ" MOORE 

Management DIVE KRAUS 

H. ELVIN MACK 

Comedian at liberty for comedy or burlesque. 

110 B. 14th Street. 



Joe, Myra, Buster and Jingles 

KEATON 

Eccentric Comedians 

Address THE MAN WITH THE TABLE. WII-IJ 
AND TWO KIDS. 220 West 38th Street. N. Y., 
cere of Ehrlch House. 

McOloin & Smith 

Artistic Delineators of Refined Singing sad 

Wooden Shoe Dancing. 
Address WM. MOKItlS 

JACK MASON 

Producer and Gen'l Stage Director 

Mgr. Five Society Belles 

Address care of STAIR & HAVLIN 

BROADWAY THEATRE BL'ILDINO 

c V)»s- f • Se nto n 

♦ THE NARROW FELLER." 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



28 



VARIETY. 



ANOTHER TREMEN 




HIT 



O F* THE 



THIS. J. 

■mi 



RYAN-RICHFIELD CO 




IIS 



— 



— 






Sfi 



MAC HAGGERTY'S RECEPTION" 



The LATEST of the HAGGERTY SKETCHES. A sequel to "MAG HAGGERTY'S FATHER" and "MIKE HAGGERTY'S DAUGHTER." 
Written by WILL M. CRESSY. Present season of thirty-eight weeks closes at Hammer stein's, June 3d. 






THIS IS THE ANSWER 

Season 1906-1907 booked solid. Direction WM. MORRIS 

STARRING TOUR 1907-1908. DIRECTION PERCY C. WILLIAMS 

"TIE MOST SENSIBLE POPULAR S0N6 EVER WRITTEN," an district attorney williii t. jerque 

AMD EVERY ONE ELSE THAT'S HEABD IT. 




IT'S CALLED 



Keep on the 
Sunny Side 

The Only Waltz Song Hit on the Market 

Send for it now. Oreheatrationa in any key to suit your voice. 
Put it on, end ret aome of our "Chorus Circlet.' * The whole audience will 

join in. 

F. B. HAVILAND PUB. CO. 

I*S \A/BST 37th ST., NEW/ YOftK. 

NO BRANCH OFFICES ANYWHERE. 

Send late programme and stamps for postage. Cards not recognized. 



* 



$ 



^wst% 



t 



Words by 
JACI DI1SLANE. 



Music by 
THEODORE M01SE 



s '& 



? 



CHORUS 

Keep on the Sunny Side, 

And let dull car* pass you by ; 

Just figure out you're a long time dead, 

Don't start to worry or sigh ; 

Ween and you weep alone, 

Don't give ur hope 'til you've tried 

Don't join trr crowds 

Tha' walk under dark clouds, 

But keep on the sunny side. 

Copyrighted 1906 by F B. Hi vilatd Pub. Co. 

The waits song hit of 1906 by the writers of 
Blue Bell. Cosy Corner, Etc. 

Published by 

F. B. HAVILAND PUB. CO. 
12S W. 37th STIEET. 

MEW YORK. 



SOMETHING AWAY FROM THE BEATEN PATHS OF MUSICAL ACTS 

THE ROYAL MUSICAL FIVE 



SPARKLING MELODIES 



UNIQUE ELECTRICAL EFFECTS 



UTILIZING 7 DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS 



2 CHANGES OF COSTUMES 



CLEAN CUT 



CLEVER 



REFINED 



'The Royal Musical Five" is the smartest act that has struck vaudeville in many a day.— Brooklyn Press. "The act is bound to please." — Sim*, 

W. HERBERT MOSELEY. Mgr., Room 25. 235 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



VAUOLViLLE HEADLINE!) S 

dOOO siandaad acts 



AND 



If you have an odd open week you want to fill at 

abort notioe write to W. L. DOCKSTADLR. 

Oarrick Theatre, Wilmington, Del. 

Ceo close Sat unlay ulgbt and make hu\ city east 

of rhlcnrn to rt|*»n \1mnUr nlrht 

Vaudeville 

reformers of nil kinds. Especially SINGING ami 
NOVELTIES for GlovernTlll*\ N. Y.. Fmnkfurd. 
Fa., and other bouaes. Also good planl«t. Address 

J. B. MORRIS. 
119 W. 26th St.. N. Y. C. 
•Phone 3095— Mad. Sq. 

HOUSE MANAGER AT LIBERTY, -inn- wits 
ideae and who la thoroughly rellahle and temper- 
ate. Address L. D. B., care of Variety. 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OF HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

51. MK\ EKFELD, JR.. Prea. 

MARTIN BECK, General Manager. 
FRANK VINCENT, N. Y. Representative. 
All Applications for Time Mast be Addressed to 
C ■• BRAY. Booking Manager, 
Ms)*stJe Tbestre Bldg.. Chicago. 111. 



A. H. WOODS 

Can use sister acta and sketch teams for 
next s asoti. 



BOB WAIT 



WRITES SONC.8, MONO- 
LOGUES, 8 K ETC HE 8, 
COMEDIES AND DRAMAS. 
EST. 1*70. REST ORIGINAL WORK V*>R 

Professionals, sosa walnut st.. 

Philadelphia, l'a. 



OCEAN TO OCt-AN 

SULLIVAN & CONSIDINE 

CIRCUIT 
Largest Circuit of Family Theatres In the Work* 

Owning and Operating 49 First 'Class Vaudeville Theatres East, North- 
west and West 

IJI/n IXITsCTri at all times. FIRST-CLASS ACTS OF ALL KINDS that 
1/1//-% 1^1 1 KZsl-Jf omn deliver tSa goods 

SOLE BOOKING AOCNTS 

BERNSTEIN ft 0NEEN. CHRIS 0. BROWW. «7 8. Clark St.. Chisago. 

OS^WW^^fV^S^tNSl-. WsAL ±B°H» LEVY. Ill Eddy St. San Francis, OaL 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Varisty. 



THIRTY-TWO PAGES. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 




Entered as second-class matter December 22, 1905, at the post office at New York, & Y., under the Act of Congress of March 3. 1879. 



VARIETY 



THOMPSON & DUNDY AT FT. GEORGE. 

Variety exclusively printed some time 
ago that the firm of Thompson & Dundy, 
the managers of the Hippodrome and Luna 
Park, were intent, on securing a site for 
a summer amusement resort at Fort 
l.eorge, on the upper west aide of the city, 
and it may now be announced in advance 
of the official declaration that the final 
contracts have been signed by the parties 
in interest. 

A ground lease at an annual rental of 
Jf'40,000 for twenty years of ninety three 
city lots has been secured from Mr. Jen- 
nings of Jennings, Stetson & Russell, the 
corporation lawyers, on the Fort George 
site, and operations will commence the 
middle of the coming summer so that the 
amusement resort will be in full blast by 
the beginning of the 1007 season. 

The contract for the lease was signed 
on March 7, and the final signatures ap 
pended on March 14. A condition of the 
lease is that the Hippodrome firm shall 
not expend less than $300,000 on the prop- 
erty, and another covenant reads that if 
the owners of the property desire to re- 
purchase after ten years and before the 
expiration of the term, that may be ac- 
complished by paying to the lessees the 
original sum invested not to exceed the 
stated amount of $300,000, the buildings 
and all appurtenances thereon reverting 
to the purchasers. 

August Belmont of the Interborough 
Company has subscribed to the bonds of 
the new company to be formed by 
Thompson & Dundy for the promotion of 
this enterprise to the extent of $50,000 
and the balance will be taken by the 
< lutes crowd of financiers, including the 
City National Bank contingent, who are 
the present backers of the youthful 
managers. 

Belmont on behalf of the subway man- 
agement has agreed to build an electric 
railway from the foot of the Dyckman 
street station in a circuitous route up the 
hill to Audubon avenue. The Metropoli- 
tan Traction Comlpany will extend its 
tracks in that neighborhood to meet the 
line up Dyckman street, giving direct 
transportation facilities into the new 
park. 

The negotiations continued eight months 
I ip fore finallv consummated. 



MOORE AND DAVIS IN COMBINATION. 

Acting on the principle that it is bet- 
ter to furnish one's own opposition than 
to permit an outsider to come in, James H. 
Moore and Harry Davis will build a new 
ten-cent house in Rochester. 

The Cox Building will be made over 
into a theatre, some $30,000 being sj>ent 
on construction, half of which will go into 
the front. Sixteen shows daily will be 
given but a single admission will permit 
the auditor to remain as long as he de- 
sires. 

The place will be actively managed by 
Harry Davis and from the details ob 
tainable it would appear that Moore is 
let in the scheme simply to make what 
profit he is able from the erection of an- 
other house. 



GRAPEWIN AND CHANCE OPEN. 

After touring as the stars of "John 
Henry," Charles Graj>cwin and Anna 
Chance will return to vaudeville. The 
booking will be taken care of by Jules 
Ruby. 



FYNES MOVES FORWARD. 

Rumors liave been persistently circu- 
lated to the effect that J. Austin Fynes 
in his new theatrical venture was merely 
acting for B. F. Keith and attention was 
called to the fact that Philadelphia and 
Boston did not appear in the Fynes Hate. 

Mr. Fynes now announces that he holds 
an option on the Chestnut Street Theatre 
in Philadelphia, which will probably be 
taken up, and that he will have a house 
in Boston as soon as one may be found 
offering sufficient promise of profit. Five 
different houses in Boston have been urged 
upon him, but he is not satisfied with 
what has yet been offered and is looking 
for another. 

It is probable that within fifteen months 
he will have possession of the Fifth Ave- 
nue Theatre. Under the lease held by 
Mr. Proctor there is a clause to the effect 
that in the event of a sale he may be 
notified the following first of May to va- 
cate within one year. The theatre forms 
a part of the Gilsey estate and will be 
sold at a partition sale April 11. Mr. 
Fynes is prepared to purchase the prop- 
erty and notify Mr. Proctor that he will 
require possession by May 1, 1907. 

Within sixty days work will be begun 
on the new site at the corner of 125th 
street and Fifth avenue and Mr. Fynes 
expects to have the house open by the end 
of the year. The Newark house he hopes 
to have finished by Thanksgiving and the 
Jersey City theatre will open April 23. 

The Third Avenue Theatre will open 
next Monday with a scale of prices run- 
ning from ten to thirty cents at the night 
performances and ten and twenty cents 
at the matinees. Every seat on the two 
lower floors will be reserved and may be 
had four weeks in advance. 

The out of town houses will be opened 
as fast a 8 they are acquired and by the 
first of the year it is probable that there 
will he a circuit of a dozen or more 
houses. 

Joe Weber's Theatre has been offered 
Mr. Fvnes, but this is too close to the 
Fifth Avenue. 



MAY TAKE LILLIAN. 

There is hope for Lillian Russell after 
all. After her ap|)earances at Proctor's 
the other managers booking through Will- 
iam Morris decided that they would have 
none of the act. Since her return, how- 
ever, William Lykens ha* been moved to 
renewed effort, and he has succeeded in 
getting Percy Williams to admit that he 
is willing to pay as much as $2,500 week- 
ly. Miss Russell is willing to take $3,000, 
but perhaps will decide to take less if 
she finds that Williams is adamant. 

In any event her name will decorate the 
billboards in Chicago after a time, con- 
tracts having been signed with the Inter- 
national Theatre people. She will stay 
for two weeks there, the International 
people being willing to pay the money for 
the distinction her name will lend the 
boards. If they play her only on the 
billboards the engagement will pay. 



LEAVITT COULDN'T MAKE GOOD. 

"Bedford's Hope" will go to Europe 
provided a resting place for it can be 
found there. M. B. Ijoavitt contracted 
With Lincoln .?. Carter, the owner of the 
• •lay, that it should appear at the Prin 
<<•>■•; Theatre at London on a 00 40 basis, 
but could not fulfil 1 the agreement. 



THREE FOR THE EASTERN WHEEL. 

(Special to Variety.) 

Chicago, March 29. 
In addition to acquiring Sid J. Euson's 
t heatre in Chicago Gus Hill and J. Herbert 
Mack, who are now in Chicago in the 
interest of the Columbia Amusement Com- 
pany (the Eastern Burlesque Wheel), have 
signed a ninety -nine year lease for a piece 
Of property on Clark street and will build 
thereon a modern theatre with a seating 
capacity of 1,800. This will make three 
houses in Chicago for the Eastern Wheel, 
the Trocadero on State street being the 
last of the trio. 



HOPPE FOR VAUDEVILLE. 

Willie Hoppe, the 18 -year-old world's 
champion billiardist, who defeated Stu- 
dent George Slosson in Grand Central 
Palace Tuesday night, will presently be 
seen in vaudeville under the management 
of Jack Levy. His opening date has not 
yet been announced. 

Hoppe's act will consist of illustrations 
of the more spectacular points of the 
American championship match in the Pal- 
ace, followed by some of the brilliant 
manipulation of the ivories in which he 
has become master. Those who have seen 
Hoppe's trick work declare that several 
<»f his performances have the look of 
magic and black art. 

Hoppe will use a full sized tournament 
table in his act, the difficulty of making 
the face of the table visible to the orches- 
tra being got, over by the use of a mirror. 



GROVER GIVES UP. 

After next week the Imperial Theatre, 
• ui Fulton street, Brooklyn, will have be- 
come a thing of the dear, dead post, as 
far as concerns its career as a vaudeville 
house under the management of William 
T. Grover. 

Although it was pretty generally known 
that the theatre was not paying very rich 
dividends as a business proposition, it was 
not anticipated that Mr. Grover was con- 
templating the immediate throwing up of 
the sjK>nge. The announcement came 
rather suddenly a-bout the middle of the 
week. The sale of the Amphion, the 
(irover house in Williamsburg, which we« 
announced some few weeks since, practi- 
cally puts Grover out of the vaudeville 
business, leaving him in loneliness with 
only his Brighton Beach summer amuse- 
ment place to comfort him. The Am- 
phion will pass from Mr. Graver's manage 
ment, it is declared, April 23. 

The sudden determination to close the 
Imperial is understood to have made 
necessary the canceling of a considerable 
number of acts. 

The Imperial Theatre was the old Mon- 
tauk. It was taken over by Mr. Grover 
under a lease for something like two 
years. Last fall Mr. Grover started it as 
a vaudeville venture. Ever since expen- 
sive acts have been given, and the im- 
pression prevails among the agents ami 
managers that Mr. Grover's losses were 
very large. 



SOUNDS LIKE A COPY. 

The Empire people (Western Wheel) 
have imported an animal act with three 
revolving tables and a comedy donkey, 
opening this week at the Monumental. 
Baltimore. Trizes are given for riding 
the donkey. "Mile. Luba De Sarema's 
Circus" is the name of the turn. 



REICH, PLUNKETT & WESLEY. 

"The new firm" of Reich & Plunkett 
announce that they have just closed an 
arrangement by which Louis Wesley, the 
well known actor and manager for Fred 
Walton, ha* been admitted into a three- 
cornered partnership, the firm name here 
after to be Reich, Plunkett & Wesley. 
Their oflices are on the tenth floor of the 
St. James Building —numbered 1024. 

Under the new arrangement the concern 
will exclusively control Fred Walton ami 
company, in "Cissie's Dream"; Junie Me 
Cree and company and several other high- 
priced organizations. In addition to these 
they declare they have entered upon a 
more aggressive policy, and will presently 
bring out a number of new vaudeville fea- 
ture acts, among them Julian Rose, Frank 
Oakley ("Slivers"), Alexander Clark and 
La Petite Adelaide. 

The division is as follows: Felix Reich 
will handle the park business, I/mis Wes- 
ley will attend to the big vaudeville acts 
and James Plunkett will swing the office 
details of the enterprise. 



CLIFFORD CLOSED. 

William Clifford was closed in Worces- 
ter last week by the house management. 
There was an argument in which threats 
of a suit were made against the Keith 
Booking Agency. It was explained to him 
that such an action would only serve to 
advertise the fact that he was utterly un 
able to carry out his contract to entertain 
and Clifford wisely decided not to give 
further publicity to the fact that he had 
not 'made good." 



SHUBERTS SCORE AGAIN. 

(Special to Variety.) 

Worcester, Mass., March 30. 
It is understood here that the Shubert 
Brothers have secured the lease of the 
Worcester Theatre in this town, taking 
the same practically from under the noses 
of Klavv & Erlanger. The syndicate firm 
was after the lease, but through clever 
manipulation the Shubert s beat them 
out. 



LAMKIN STICKS TO MORRIS. 

If. H. I .am kin of Toledo, having a 
vaudeville theatre there, was in town the 
past week and denied the report that he 
would affiliate with the Keith l>ooking 
agency. 

While admitting that he has received 
some acts from Keith's in the past, lie 
stated that his bookings would continue 
to 1m» made through the Morris office. 



REMICK LOSES JEROME AND 
SCHWARTZ. 

Billy Jerome and Jean Schwartz. wln» 
have contributed considerably to the mi< 
cess of the Jerome If. Remi<k & Co. pub 
Mentions, will shortly leave that firm owini: 
to dissatisfaction. 

What new connections, if any, the wri 
era have made or will make have not 1>ccii 
disclosed. 



WILL MORRIS GET THE ORPHEUM ? 

It has been stated that the Orpheum 
circuit of the West, which is allied with 
the Western Vaudeville Association, has 
made overtures to be taken into the Moi 
ris camp. No confirmation of the report 
could be obtained. 



VARIETY 



fiKlETY 

A Variety Paper fer Variety People. 

Published e?erj Saturday bj 
THB VARIMTY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building. 
1402 Broadway, New York City. 

Telephone 1837— 38th St. 

8IME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 
22, 1005, at the post office at New York, N. Y.. 
under the act of Congress of March 8, 1870. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

10 e«'iit8 an nj?ate line. $2.10 an Inch. One 
page, $100; one-half page, $50, uue-qnarter page, 
$2.".. 

Charge for portraits furnished on application. 

Special rate by the month for professional card 
under heading "Representative Artists." 



SUBSCRIPTION RATBS. 

Aunual •• »fj 

Foreign • 

Six and three months in proportion. 

Single copies Ore cents. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent address 
or as per route, a* desired. 

Make all remittances payable to Variety Pub- 
lishing Co. 

Copyright 1006 by Variety Publishing Co. 

Vol II. No. 3. 



VARIETY announces 'fairness" aa the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner snd for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. That's 
VARIETY. 

With this issue Variety is increased to 
thirty-two pages. While Variety has 
never been boastful, it calls attention 
to the present number, which speaks more 
eloquently than any words could possibly 
do. It is acknowledged by disinterested 
persons that Variety has more readers 
than any other theatrical paper published. 
The advertisers have discovered this, the 
increased amount of advertisements this 
week necessitating the added pages. 



Louis Pincus of Morris' office ia receiv- 
ing so much salarv now that lie has money 
left over on Monday. 



U is rumored that Mabel Hite, who is 
now appearing in vaudeville with Walter 
•''•ih's. has boon married to Mike Donlon. 
t!i" baseball player. 

The Dainty Parisiennes company will 
be reinforced next year by the presence 
<>l The Bight Bluebells a new octet of 
dancing and singing girls. 

Walter J. Plimmer, the agent, will sail 
for Europe in September for a three 
months tour of the English and conti- 
nental music balls in search of new acts. 



LeRoy and Woodford were obliged to 
cancel at the (lotham in Brooklyn this 
week through illness. 



The Hengler Sisters have been booked in 
London through Clifford (\ Fischer, leav- 
ing these shores in May to fill the time. 



E. M. Mark ii in, formerly associated 
with W. L. Lykens, the agent, has sev- 
ered the connection but will not remove 
from the building. 



Through illness May Berfort did not 
play at the Alhambra the past week, her 
place on the bill being filled by Frank 
Hush, who also appeared at Hammer- 
stein's. 



Trask and Howard with Laura Creigh- 
ton have been signed for the Alcazar 
Beauties burlesque company, giving this 
show eight acts in the olio for the balance 
of the season. 



Jesse Lasky, the manager for the new 
Morris branch office in Chicago left 
Thursday to take hold, accompanied by 
Charles Wilsin, also of the office staff, 
who will be his assistant. 



The Harnum & Bailey circus at the 
Madison Square Garden is attracting 
smaller crowds than in any previous year. 
A burlesque of the circus' feature act has 
been put on at the Hippodrome by Mar- 
celine and Slivers, the clowns there. It 
is reported to be superior to the original 
because it's funny. 



William Josh Daly has become at- 
tached in more than a figurative way to 
William Morris' office staff, and will act 
as Mr. Morris' personal representative, be- 
sides having charge of the club bookings. 
P. F. Casey will also act as a personal 
representative for Morris when the latter 
is too busy to be disturbed. 



In the latest craze for ''protean" and 
"lightning change" acts the fact that 
the same thing happened thirty years ago 
has been overlooked. It is history re- 
peating itself. At that time two artists, 
Horace Qoldin and a man named Milburn 
did lightning changes, without thought 
of continued story, causing a variety sen- 
sation. Fregoli, when that Italian artist 
appeared upon what is now the Xew 
York Theatre Roof, created a great deal 
of talk, but did not cause the fever of 
imitation to spread which has followed 
the R. A. Roberts and Henri de Vrhw 
American engagements in vaudeville. 



Charles K. Harris, the music publisher, 
has taken an additional floor in the build- 
ing where he is now located. 



The end of the season may see the 
finish of "protean" and "girl" acts. Both 
have been overdone in a short time. 



John J. Iris states he has been paid 
by Henry Myers for all the time he 
worked at the Doric Theatre in Yonkers. 

Owing to the serious illness of Mrs. 
Itado of Rado and Bertman, the Keith's, 
Philadelphia, date for last week held by the 
team had to be cancelled. 



Sam Fell, the treasurer of the Trent 
Theatre in .Trenton, leaves that position 
to-day to accept a similar one at Keith's 
Grand Opera House in Syracuse. 



Alfred Butt, the manager of the Palace, 
London, is only to remain here about ten 
days. He will visit Chicago and a few 
more places. This is his first visit to 
America. 



A representative of a morning j>aper 
making a pretence at publishing vaude- 
ville news and criticisms is acting as a 
vaudeville agent, placing some time over 
the Keith circuit. 



Kamos "Mumming Birds" have been 
Inioked for fifty-four weeks for next sea 
-«>n, with contracts, sealed, signed and de- 
livered by William Morris. Four repeats 
only are claimed to have been included. 



Since the announcement of the plans of 
.1. Austin Fynes, the name of Jules Ruby 
creeps into the news more often than of 
recent times. The coincidence may not be 
significant in any sense, but serves to evi- 
dence that Ruby still lives. 



Staley and Birbeck had to cancel Poli's, 
New Haven, on account of the death of 
Frank Staley, brother of Drum mom] 
Staley. at Hot Springs, Ark. Smith and 
Fuller in their musical act were substi- 
tuted on Tuesdav afternoon. 



In the review of the bill at Keeney's 
Theatre. Brooklyn, last week, through an 
• •rror of the program man in not distin- 
guishing the color of Wise and Melton, 
that team was credited as on the bill in 
► lead of MctJloin and Smith, who replaced 
them. 



Harrv Hurtig, one of the manv Hurtig 
brothers, and who is the manager of the 
Bast able Theatre in Svracuse. a Hurtig 
& Seamon house, has proved himself 
.somewhat jealous of the capacity busi- 
ness done in the Salt City on each Sun- 
day night by the, Keith Grand Opera 
House, when the vaudeville bill of the 
week is repeated. Mr. Hurtig has gom- 
around Syracuse lately raving over the 
incompetency of the police officials for 
not suppressing Sunday performances. 
The police having closed down a series of 
fight pictures on a Sabbath recently at 
the Bastable may account for Mr. 
Hu i tig's envy. 



The Keith Booking Agency will add one 
large room to its present space in the St. 
Tames Building after May 1. The Ingei 
soil & Hopkins Co., occupying the room 
adjoining the Keith offices, neglected to 
notify the landlord in due lime of their 
intention to remain, and Keith stepped 
into the gap. 



When William Morris, the vaudeville 
:i gent, bought his residence on Washing* 
roti Heights, the. real estate agents re 
reived a check in full payment for the 
property, something out of the ordinary in 

-uch transactions. They had been arguing 
with themselves whether the mortgage 
I (resumed to be wanted should be at ">''. 
■ •! »» per cent, and when the entire amounl 
of cash was turned over the realty brokers 

■ anted to know "Who in is this 

William Morrisf" 



l^ouis Werba will put out immediately 
a new pony ballet act with eight girls. 
It will probably be seen on the New York 
roof this season. 



Vesta Victoria is soon to go back. She 
is due at the Oxford and Tivoli, London. 
Miss Victoria finds matinee work so tire- 
>ome that it will take $2,000 weekly to 
get her back. 



Last Monday there were seven cancel- 
lations on the Williams circuit and half 
a dozen other houses found themselves 
with an incomplete bill because of illness 
or cussedness. 



Several English acts hearing such good 
accounts of English successes over here 
have made up their minds to cross this 
coming season. I hope the result is the 
same as this season. 



Philip Mindil, formerly general prees 
representative for F. F. Proctor, is now 
with J. Austin Fynes, and views with 
pride his name in gilt letters on an office 
in the financial district. 



Ceorge Fuller Golden is contemplating 
cancelling his London contract. The 
mountains appeal to him more. This 
will be the second monologist to disap- 
point this season. James Thornton was 
the first. 



Tbm Hearn should be on the ocean 
this week, but the rough weather caused 
him to cable for one more month to be 
postponed in England. He is at Chase's, 
Washington, next week. When, oh when 
will he ^o back? 

Lou Zeigler is in fear that Variety did 
not make his denial that he never 
"knocked" anything or anybody in the last 
issue strong enough. Mr. Zeigler says he 
wrote us about a column and one-half, and 
that it came out in print in three lines. 



There was a fire in Hunt's Hotel in Chi- 
cago Tuesday morning that considerably 
scared the theatrical people who largely 
|Mitronize the place. Charley Case discov- 
ered the blaze and in answer to his 
alarm the employees stretched the hose 
and extinguished the flames. 



William L. Lykens has followed the 
William Morris Agency to the Holland 
Building. His former office on the second 
floor of 31 West Thirty-first street was 
vacated yesterday. Ed, M. Markum, who 

sf m * 

has shared the establishment for some 
time, early this week moved out into ie 
general offices of Charles K. Harris, but 
following the Lykens exit he now prom- 
ises to take possession of his old stand 
agailt. 



Sydney Crant finished his engagement 
lit the Hay market in Chicago last Satur 
day and started for the train with his 
wife. A couple of highwaymen thought 
it a good chance to earn some easy money 
and set upon the undersized imitator. 
They had not taken into consideration 
the fact that Mrs. Orant is a singer and 
when she turned the toll foree of her 
lung power into ;i recitative, the burden 
of which was "Help!" they realized that 
there might possibly !><• a policeman with 
in hearing distance and decamped. 



VARIETY 



Why the Vaudeville Artists 

o! America Should Organize 



BY SIME. 



It Is a doubtful question whether the 
artists of America would receive any aid 
from the International Artisten Loge in an 
attempt at organization in this country, 
whether independently or in affiliation. 

The home lodge of the I. A. L. at Berlin 
does not look with favor upon branches 
in countries where strength may be de- 
veloped to overbalance that power which 
is rigidly maintained at Berlin through a 
clique. 

This has been the experience of the 
English lodge of the I. A. L., established in 
London, and to prevent a repetition the 
I. A. L. may not care to inaugurate an 
American branch until the necessity for in- 
ternational protection renders it impera- 
tive. 

The artists here are numerous enough to 
organize without foreign assistance, follow- 
ing only the principles laid down by the 
German lodge. 

There is no gainsaying the fact that the 
most vital reasons for organization at the 
present time are the bookings and con- 
tracts. There is no preference in these 
matters between any managers or agents. 
All have a loose style of doing business 
which prevents a positive date being car- 
ried out, although the contract mentions 
the time without equivocation. 

When an artist does not know where he 
will play two days before the time con- 
tracted for in writing, and when the man- 
ager is not certain of his bill until the 
first show, the time has certainly arrived 
where drastic measures are required to reg- 
ulate a system rapidly becoming demoral- 
ized through lack of that selfsame thing. 

There is no plea plausible that organiza- 
tion cannot be had for lack of concentra- 
tion of the artists. It needs a few leading 
spirits in such a movement to bring them 
together and devise plans whereby all 
variety artists may be reached in any 
locality. 

After the groundwork has been mapped 



and a prospectus got out, it would not 
need a mass meeting of all artists to form 
the society -, they could become members by 
mail, receiving some insignia of member- 
ship. 

Branch meetings might be held at any 
time or place by having a quorum present - , 
and in this manner the artists would, 
through traveling so quickly come in con- 
tact with one another as lodge members. 

The most difficult part of the proceed- 
ings will be to frame a constitution, strict- 
ly impartial, and which will appeal to all as 
fair alike to manager and artist. 

That constitution to insure fairness 
must have a section providing for a gov- 
erning board, which shall be representa- 
tive of all grades of artists, and precluding 
the possibility of absolute dictation 
through collusion. 

If that may be done a permanent artists' 
organization will result, and that is the 
only way a truly representative society 
will be launched. 



Editor Variety : 

Sir: — I have read, with much interest, 
from week to week, your articles on why 
vaudeville artists should organize, and con- 
sider them from a protective standpoint 
of especial interest, both to the artist and 
manager. That the vaudeville artists 
should organize no one realizes more 
keenly than I do, for if the present state 
of affairs continues to exist the artist will 
be entirely at the mercy of both manager 
and agent. 

With a proper organization it would be 
possible for an entirely different state of 
affairs to exist. It would insure the per- 
former, as well as the manager, of the ful- 
fillment of all contracts. That such an 
organization would be educative as well as 
protective there can be no doubt. I await 
with interest your next issue. 

C. Leslie Evang. 



BIG BENEFIT AT KEITH'S. 

Keith's Union Square Theatre will be 
open to-morrow afternoon and evening 
when benefit performances will be given 
in aid of the Home of Refuge for Desti- 
tute Crippled Children, a private charity 
founded several years ago by Mrs. A. L. 
Erlanger, and since largely supported by 
benefit entertainments tendered by the- 
atrical people. The Keith benefit is an 
annual institution and one of the very 
rare occasions when the theatre is thrown 
open on Sunday. 

Among those who have volunteered 
their services for to-morrow are John C. 
Rice and Sally Cohen, Rose Stahl A Co., 
the Empire City Quartet, Hurd the ma- 
gician, Gus Edwards and his Telegraph 
Boys, Byron and Langdon, Tom Moore, 
Lillian Shaw, Jack Norworth, May Bel- 
fort, the Elinore Sisters, Stuart Barnes, 
the Howard Brothers, Daisy Hareourt and 
Taylor Holmes. 



FISCHER LEAVES FOR EUROPE. 

Clifford C. Fischer, who has caused some 
consternation in the ranks of the foreign 
agents in this country since he branched 
out as "The Agents' Agency," after leav- 
ing H. B. Marinelli, left New York to- 
day for London, his first stop in a tour 
of England and the Continent. 

During his trip Mr. Fischer expects to 
perfect arrangements with foreign agents 
which will result in his agency having the 
exclusive American handling of some of the 
largest and best known foreign acts. 

Mr. Fischer expects to be away about 
two months. 



The Jackson Family of bicyclists have 
worked steadily for fifty-three weeks. % 



FOREIGN ACTS IN BURLESQUE. 

The Wahlfreid Sextette, a girl act, will 
sail for this side late in July to become 
a feature of Whalen and Mart ell's bur- 
lesque organization, the Brigadiers next 
season. 

This firm will also import for their 
Kentucky Belles company next season 
the sisters Mayinel-MullinL, a pair of 
Austrian instrumentalists. 



NEW SUNDAY RULING. 

Police Magistrate Charles G. F. Wahle 
in one of the Sunday cases growing out 
of the present agitation has given a de- 
cision that is of vital interest to every 
performer playing the New York theatres 
on Sunday evenings. 

This is to the effect that every artist 
appearing in a concert in violation of the 
law governing these performances is li- 
able to arrest and imprisonment equally 
with the manager who aids and abets the 
violation of the law. 

Under this decision the police officer 
must arrest the manager only when it is 
shown that he is cognizant of a violation 
of the law. 

In other words should the various house 
managers of the Proctor circuit be absent 
from their offices on that evening, proof 
must first be had that they are re- 
sponsible for the performance being given 
before they may be taken into custody, 
but the artist appearing must be arrested 
at the time of his offence, together with 
whoever is in charge of the house at the 
time. 

This does not release the manager from 
responsibility, but it does render every 
artist appearing at a Sunday night con- 
cert in tl is city liable to arrest. Sub- 
sequently the Magistrate decides whether 
or not there has been an infraction of 
the law, but in the event of an acquittal 
the artist is left without any redress 
from a civil action for false arrest un- 
less it can be shown that the arrest was 
made through wilful malice and not in 
the performance of police duty. 

Any member of the uniformed force or 
any detective sergeant may use his own 
discretion in making an arrest, and it is 
probable that those reformers who seek 
the abolishment of the Sunday concert 
will make it plain to the force that the 
policeman on beat will have charges pre- 
ferred against him for neglect of duty if 
he does not make arrests. 

This places the artist in a very bad 
position. If he should refuse to play on 
that evening and the performance should 
not prove to be illegal, he would be break- 
ing a contract and his salary could be 
withheld until some decision was had. 
On the other hand, if he decides to play 
and some policeman happens along he 
will be placed under arrest, and in the 
event of having an engagement for out 
of town the following week would either 
have to jump his bail or remain for trial 
and lose the week's work. 

There is absolutely no precedent in the 
matter. The recent decision in the case 
of Heinrich -Conried is absolutely value- 
less, for in that case the issue was on a 
purely concert performance, while the 
laws upon the subject are definite in their 
prohibition of most classes of acts of the 
stage. Practically the only things per- 
missible are singing, reciting and the per- 
formance upon musical instruments, but 
in every instance where such matters have 
come to trial the legal representative of 
the manager has managed to shift the 
issue to some other point and by quibbling 
secure the release of his client. 

The nearest approach to a decision is 
that handed down by Justice Gaynor in 
the matter of Sunday baseball games in 
Brooklyn. The cases are not parallel, but 
it was broadly ruled that a violation ex- 
isted only when the actions of the de- 
fendants tended to disturb the peace and 
quiet of the community. Under such a 



decision there would be no difficulty in 
escaping trouble, but the law regarding 
concerts is singularly definite and explicit 
were the police magistrates inclined to 
construe it rightly and small comfort 
may be had from the Gaynor decision. 

Until there is some settlement reached 
no artist appearing at Sunday perform- 
ances is immune from arrest, yet he has 
absolutely no grounds for refusing to aj» 
pear on the plea that he is being required 
to break the law, since every police magis- 
trate holds his own peculiar opinion as 
to the meaning of the clause and his de- 
cision must be accepted. 




MAUDE EDNA HALL, 

Now on the Keith Circuit. 

She will have a dual role In the new one-act 
comedy which she and her husband, Carleton 
Macy. are preparing for next season, called "THE 
STAR BOARDER." 



MAY IRWIN REFUSED. 

The new manager of the Herald Square 
Theatre, George Ilomans, seeking a sen- 
sational announcement for the opening of 
the house for vaudeville, offered May Ir- 
win $10,000 for four weeks if she would 
consent to play two at his playhouse. 

Miss Irwin refused the offer, not be- 
cause Mr. Homans did not tell her where 
t lie other two were to be played, but be 
cause she is not thinking seriously of 
vaudeville — just yet. 



WILLIAMS KEEPS CIRCLE. 

In spite of the definite announcement 
made to the effect that the Circle Theatre 
would pass to the Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel, Percy Williams will renew his 
lease of that house. 



NEW BURLESQUE HOUSE ON THE 
BOWERY. 

It is understood that Miner's Bowery 
Theatre will no longer attract patrons to 
burlesque this season, the place left va- 
cant by its withdrawal from the Western 
Wheel being filled by the People's Theatre 
on the same highway, and which also be 
longs to the Miner estate. 

The operation being a mere shifting of 
locations, no change in the Western 
Wheel route or bookings is necessary. 



VARIETY. 



L.EO GARILLO'S CARTOON OP THE WEEK. 








If I -^ 



f ^CL7iM/>4f //vro r"«- fur u *? 6: J 





HIPPODROME'S CLOSING DATE. 

June 30 has been set at the closing 
date for the Hippodrome, although there 
is the usual "shop" talk of remaining 
open over the summer. It is likely that 
the closing will occur before. 



DETROIT HOUSE OPENS APRIL 9. 

The Lafayette Theatre in Detroit, 
which will be booked through William 
Morris, will present its first vaudeville 
bill from that office on April 9. 



WALTON'S HEADLINE COMPANY. 

The completed bill of the Fred Walton 
vaudeville show which takes the road on 
April 30, opening at Hyde & Beh man's 
in Brooklyn, contains the names of many 
acts familiar to vaudeville patrons. 

The roster will be Fred Walton & Co., 
George Fuller Golden, Six Musical Cuttys, 
Stanton and Modena, Ford and Gehrue, 
the Van Aukens, Will Archer and the 
Marco Twins. 

Time will be secured for a week or 
more at Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Pittsburg, and a few other 
Eastern cities. 



VOKES AND DALY. 

"A Pair of Pinks" will soon appear in 
vaudeville in the persons of Harry Vokes 
and. Margaret Daly. That title will noc 
be used, having been the heading of the 
play in which Ward and Vokes formerly 
appeared. At the beginning of this sea- 
son Hap Ward left his partner to pursue 
the legitimate highway alone in "The 
Grafter." 

Mr. Vokes continued the first named 
play until recently induced by Jack Levy 
to give up the road and. settle down as 
a vaudevillian once more. Miss Daly was 
also persuaded and the couple will appear 
together. 



tics which would result in the end of the 
fight now being waged and several meet- 
ings of the rival factions have been held. 
The Eastern Wheel was represented at 
the meetings by Sam Scribner, Larry 
Weber and Gus Hill, but it was a hope- 
less proposition confronting them. 

The Eastern people have concluded that, 
peace is out of the question, for the 
present in any event, although the un- 
expected may happen. 



of playing favorites in giving the Morris 
agency the Marinelli acts and indulging 
in other bits of airy persiflage. 

Fischer explained that he went where 
he could get decent treatment, which was 
the reason why he did not visit the Keith 
offices. Albee gracefully called him a 
"stiff" and the blow followed. 

Mr. Albee's feelings are hurt far worse 
than his face. 



NO HOPE OF PEACE. 

The principal members of the Empire 
Circuit (Western Wheel) of burlesque 
made several ineffectual attempts during 
the past ten days to have the white dove 
of peace hover over the warring burlesque 
divisions, through conferences with the 
leaders in the Columbia Amusement Com- 
pany (Eastern Wheel). 

James Butler, the president of the Em- 
pire circuit, particularly attempted tac- 



ALBEE GETS HIS. 

E. F. Albee got his Thursday after- 
noon and Clifford C. Fischer will never 
have to buy another drink as long as there, 
is an actor in sight unless he so elects. 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., Martin Heck and 
John J. Murdock are in town and Fischer 
("ailed to pay his respects. While he and 
Mr. Meyerfeld were chatting, Mr. Albee 
came in with Mr. Masse, the new head 
of the Marinelli agency here. 

There was some coldness in the greet- 
ings between Albee and the agent. Albee 
patted Masse on the back and showered 
verbal bouquets upon him, saying things 
to hurt Fischer's feelings, accusing him 



FOOLISH ADVERTISING. 

During the week about twenty "sand- 
wich" men paraded the street advertising 
the fact that the Barnum & Bailey show 
at the Madison Square Garden was not as 
good as that at the Hippodrome. The 
Hippodrome people paid the men and it 
resulted in those who had been to the 
Hippodrome concluding to go to the circus 
to see if the truth was being told. 



HARRIGAN AS "PANHANDLE PETE." 

James llarrigan, the tramp juggler, 
now out with "The Ham Tree," will leave 
that organization to assume the title role 
in "Panhandle Pete" when the latter 
piece goes on the road. 






VARIETY 






Horace Goldin. 

Illusions. 

Colonial. 

Working so rapidly that five assistants 
are at times required to handle his prop- 
erties, Horace Coldin crowds a two-hour 
entertainment of magic into a half-hour 
compass. Cioldin has made rapid strides, 
hut even with this fact in mind it was 
hardly to be expected that his new offer- 
ing would be such a- vast -improvement 
over the old. The performance shows im- 
provement in every way. Goldin's great- 
est fault of old was the repetition of a 
trick in slightly altered form, as, for in- 
stance, a series of three illusions in each 
of which he disappeared and took the 
place of his assistant. Now he replaces 
his assistant but once. The old work is 
more cleverly done, and the new tricks 
add greatly to the value of his program. 
The feature trick is firing a woman from 
a cannon into a nest of trunks suspended 
from the dome of the auditorium. The 
trunks are in place when the audience en- 
ters the theatre, and there is much com- 
ment caused as to the possible mode of 
entry. It is merely the old nest of jewel 
cases in a new guise, but the audience 
does not appear to realize this, and great 
is their mystification. He does the plant 
and pot trick, exchanging the covers with 
a deftness he did not possess the last 
time he was here, and in many ways he 
shows that he has gained in expertness. 
His old trick in which Miss Francioli is 
made to disapear while swung in a chair 
from a crosspiece is now changed to show 
an airship, in the car of which she sits. Jt 
was badly worked Wednesday evening, 
the mr being lowered before the curtains 
screening the descent were fully closed. 
In the Aga trick the cradle presses her 
leg too tightly, and the support is rather 
clumsily concealed by flowers, but through 
a simple trick Goldin passes the hoop 
straight past the body instead of using 
the double turns required by the use of 
the "S." He comes from behind the 
casket, and this also adds to the effect. 
Apart from these two tricks no fault may 
may be found with the working of what 
is the best magical act shown in New 
York in a long time, if, indeed, it has ever 
been equaled. Chicot. 



Grace Fields. 
"Girl Act." 
Doric, Yonkers. 

Miss Fields was formerly the Matinee 
Girl in "It Happened in Xordland," and 
the girls surrounding her in the first week 
of the act at the Doric Theatre, Yonkers, 
are from the same company. A portion 
of the music has been obtained from the 
same source, while the rest has been writ- 
ten by a Mrs. O'Day, and the staging 
attended to by a Mr. (Jebest. Miss Fields 
and her six young women are fashionably 
costumed in the opening, which adds 
greatly to the success of the act. The 
leader is of engaging personality, with a 
pleasant voice, and wins the audience im- 
mediately uj>on her first entrance. Dur- 
ing the time required for a change the 
Misses Birch and Carson execute a catchy 
dance. They are called the White Picka 
ninnies. For a finale all the chorus ap- 
l»ear in pantalets in a song and dance 
led by Miss Fields with a change of cos 
tume to a harmonious coloring. One of 
the young women has a tendency to lift 
her skirts too high, and also to act in a 



f NEW AGTS OP THE WCDKj 

loo conspicuous manner to preserve the Harry B. Lester and Mascottes. 
uniformity, and the act drags a trifle "Girl Act." 
just before Miss Fields' second entrance, Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 
but it may be credited as the best drilled, Jester and his Eight Mascot Cirla were 

best looking and best girl act yet seen ,..jied upon at too short notice to go be- 
in vaudeville. Sime. tore an a uJience with their new offering. 

It shows inadequate rehearsal and lack of 
study in places, but has material that 
should make it a go when it has been 
smoothed out by repetition. 

The eight girls, led by Pauline Elliott, 
are uniformly pretty and shapely and 
are gorgeously dressed. They know how 
to dance but the ohoruse s are a bit 
ragged. Coaching will correct this. They 
close with a patriotic song with red, 
white and blue trimmings, which scored 
strongly. 

Mr. Lester has several telling musical 
numbers and closes the act in "one" with 
his impersonation of George M. Oohan. 
The act proper had a tryout at Keeney's 
Theatre in Brooklyn recently witliout Mr. 
Lester, who joined after the reorganiza- 
tion. Rush. 




tion, that Carlisle and Baker make no 
effort to inject comedy into their work. 

On the piano their execution is skillful 
andyeven brilliant, and except for the 
ous vein in which the two men seem 
o take themselves, the offering is very 
well worth while. Hunk. 



Lionel E. Lawrence's 
"Rialto Girls' Rehearsal." 
Hyde & Behman's. 

Both Mr. Lawrence and the act have 
suffered through his temporary attack of 
blindness which occurred last week at 
Hartford, but Mr. Lawrence is back in 
the cast although not entirely recovered. 
For that reason alone allowance must be 
made for any rough edges at present to 
what is ultimately going to prove one of 
vaudeville's laughing successes. It is a 
bare stage sketch at the opening, with a 
rehearsal called for a girl act. The 
young women report in their street cos- 
tumes to Lawrence, who is standing on 
the stage ready to put them through the 
formations and dance steps. Various ex- 
cuses are offered for tardiness, and the 
inevitable gum-chewing chorus girl is 
abundantly in evidence. One girl takes 
a chance at securing a position, but the 
stage manager asks if he hasn't "fired" 
her six times before in the past two 
years. "Yes, you have, Mr. l^iwrence," 
she answers, "but I have a letter this 
time." "Let's see it," says Lawrence, 
and upon having it handed to him read: 
"Dear Mr. Lawrence : Will you kindly take 
care of a friend of mine? Alan Dale." 
About the most natural bit of acting 
seen for some time is I>awrenee's con- 
troversy with the stage hands. At 
Hyde & Behman's, where the sketch is 
presented in its second week, the stage 
crew is unusually intelligent, and two or 
three work with a naturalness which 
would gain a permanent position could 
it l>e manipulated. The argument 
arises with a stage hand in the flies who 
refuses to raise a "sky l>order." Law- 
rente attempts to press him, when the 
man higher up calls upon the stage hands 
to throw Lawrence out of the theatre. 
The crew start to do so, whereupon Law- 
rence declares he is a union man even 
though he doesn't look it, and in proof 
produces a union card that saving him 
from the threatened ejectment, although 
the man in the flies berates his brethren 
and is still audibly speaking to himself 
while placing the border at the proper 
height. Some more business is in- 
dulged in with the stage manager and 
carpenter. "The Rialto Girls" in its real- 
ism is superior to any bare stage act yet 
shown. There is no straining for broad 
eomedy effects. The girls fairly well take 
care of their duties, and one German 
young woman is the hit of the piece, 
both in looks and otherwise. Lawrence 
does an imitation of the late Dan Daly 
to allow of a change being made by the 
females, and Alex. Munroe, who makes 
application for a position as a tenor, 
sings a pretty ballad in the opening. Ed 
Snyder is the accompanist at the piano. 
Thirteen people are carried. One of the 
girls is allowed to do disagreeable things 
with the gum she chews. That should 
be dropped at once. Simp. 



J 

Johnson, Davenport and Lorejfa. 

Acrobatics. 
Pastor's. 

Although not a new act by any means, 
an acrobatic trick attempted this week 
entitles the trio to distinct recognition. 
Some thirty odd years ago the Carnella 
Brothers successfully did what is known 
as the "nip-up;" that is the description 
given to a man lying flat on his back 
and springing to his feet unassisted. This 
was done by the IXirnella Brothers with 
one of the boys holding to the other on a 
hand-to-hand balance, the position being 
maintained in the uplifting. It is the 
most diflicult of acrobatic feats, with the 
possible exception of a triple somersault. 
It is said that two members of this trio 
did it on Wednesday afternoon. On 
Wednesday night three attempts were 
made; the first almost succeeding, while 
the second try was a failure; the third 
got through with the support of the other 
member. It is so near perfection by the 
two younger members of Johnson, Daven- 
port and Lorella that it is only a question 
of a short time when it will be cleanly 
performed. The drawback to the trick- is 
that it must be given for a finale after 
the usual work of the act has been fin- 
ished, when the men may be tired. But 
the acrobatic act succeeding in accom- 
plishing this difficult feat immediately 
takes rank as one of the leading acrobatic 
troupes of the country. Sime. 



Carlisle and Baker. 
Singers and Pianists. \ 
Imperial. ^ 

Quite a most polite pair of male colored 
performers. They sit at pianos at Oppo- 
site sides of the stage, wearing conven- 
tional evening clothes and play their own 
compositions arranged for two. From 
time to time also they sing. Their voices 
are sweet and go together well, and they 
undoubtedly made good with their first 
audiences in the East, receiving two re- 
calls. They are originally from San 
Francisco. 

The act is somewhat similar to that of 
Cole and Johnson, but with this excep- 



< 



Fred Wyckoff and Co. 
"Plain Folks." 
Doric, Yonkers. 

This is a rural piece with no author an- 
nounced. Fred Wyckoff is the leading 
character in a sketch having an unrecog- 
nizable plot, while Frank M. Gibbons plays 
opposite in a poor impersonation of a 
farmer. There is a girl in the sketch by 
name Helen Christy. "Why?" covers her 
part and character. Some applause was 
received from a Yonkers vaudevile audi- 
ence, still unable to cull the potent parts 
of a bill, through a song having adaptable 
verses which were used to bring out the 
jokes of years ago. This being apparently 
the first time they have been heard in this 
suburb of Mt. Vernon, much laughter was 
gained in the melodious telling, but the 
sketch has no merit, and is not helped any 
by the fairly passable character acting of 
Mr. Wvckoff. Sime- 



:■ 



Three Musical Monarchs. 
Pastor's. 

If the act is new, that is the only new- 
ness noticeable. The brass playing of one 
member deserves the appreciation of the 
audience, but the rest is only moderate. 
The comedian depends upon the stereo 
tyjM'd menu of so-called comedians in 
wanting to know "who will buy a dog'.'" 
and the dressing is soiled. Even though 
the expense of new clothes may not he 
gone to, at least the present costumes 
worn could be cleaned. The act seems to 
be controlled by one publishing firm, an I 
the selections in consequence have no 
claims for recognition. There must be 
a revision of the whole act before it can 
meet with much success. Sinn-. 



Prof. Dewar. 

Animals. 

Pastor's. 

The main points depended upon for ap 
proval have been taken from Goolman'-. 
• log and cat act. The same animals are 
used in this, and the resemblance between 
the two acts suggests that possibly some 
of Gool man's animals are being used. One 
dog is muzzled, and it is a wonder that 
the others are not, for the trainer is 
brutal with his whip, a stiff rod with a 
lash, which he uses unmercifully at the 
least, sign of inattention on the part of 
the canines. The act is poorly worked 
and lacks in appearances. The finish only 
rci-cives some applause. Sime. 



V 



Mazie King. 

"Utopia, or the Land of Fancy." 

Hyde & Behman's. 

This is stated to be the second week of 
the present act, consisting of three scenes, 
with dancing and one song by Miss King, 
who appears alono\jn it. The first set 
ting is called "The Garden of Roses," and 
the drop and wings are evidently a house 
set. The second scene, "The l>and of 
Snow," is probably carried, while the 
final "Niagara Falls" is merely a mov- 
ing cascade background. Applause \v:h 
received for the second section through 



VARIETY 



the setting and Miss King's toe dancing. 
The other parts of the act passed with- 
out any considerable commotion. Miss 
King should have "The Land of Snow" 
as the finale. Between scenes, moving 
picture effects are thrown upon the can- 
vas which are neither exciting nor in- 
teresting. '^ ne niusic is by William E. 
Slafer, Hyde & Behman's orchestra leader. 

Sime. 




Malveen and Thomas. 
"Sister Act." 
Doric, Yonkers. 

One of the young women belonged 
to the late act known as The Poster 
(iirls. As a team they will not create 
undue excitement in a "sister act." As 
ai early act on some bills the turn would 
he acceptable. Sime- 



OUT or TOWN 

Lavinia Shannon. 

"The Matinee Girl." 1/ 

Columbia Theatre, Cincinnati. 

More than usual interest attached to 
the app< -a ranee of Miss Lavinia Shannon, 
who appeared for the first time in vaude- 
\ille in a new monologue entitled "The 
Matinee Girl." It is divided into four 
scenes, the first at the matinee. The lines 
were extremely bright, artistically ren- 
dered, and produced a continuous laugh. 
The second scene at the ball is a cleverly 
interesting story which, while not deep of 
thought, charmed the audience by reason 
of the bright dialogue of the artist. The 
third scene, at the manager's ollice, dealt 
w it li the matinee girl who was stagestmck, 
and an interview with the manager, illus- 
trating a bright but bashful girl at- 
tempting to give a specimen of her ability 
and her efforts to keep the manager from 
getting real mad and bored at her efforts. 
Her talk to her imaginary lover as well as 
her companion was as pretty a piece of 
legitimate monologue work as has been 
seen in vaudeville for many a day. The 
final scene, at the wedding, was listless 
and had a tendency to spoil the cleverly 
told story.- Its end can be anticipated 
before the drop of the curtain. Miss 
Shannon's local engagement was of es- 
pecial interest owing to the fact of her 
having been leading lady for the Fore- 
pa ugh Stock Company of this city during 
the past two years. H. Hess. 



William Davis and Company. / 
"Ma, Belle-Anne and Me." 
Orpheum, Omaha. 

Last Saturday matinee William Davis 
gave the first tryout of a new sketch by 
himself that promises to make exceedingly 
rood. Mr. Davis has invaded the moon- 
shiners' country of Kentucky for the locale 
of his sketch, and has created for himself 
the role of a henpecked moonshiner- a 
veritable Kentucky Rip Van Winkle — who 
believes that his duty to his family ends 
with shooting at revenue officers. The 
playlet is filled with heart interest in tho 
desire of "Pa" to let Belle-Anne marry 
the man she loves, a desire that is nipped 
in the bud by a shrewish step mother. In 
a moment of love for his daughter, how- 
desire of Pa to let Belle-Anne marry 
her out of the house for a runaway mar- 
riage, and then in a prodigality of inde 
pendence helps himself to some corn pone 
which Ma has denied him all day. 

While the sketch showed a lack of 



action during the first half, it promises 
with revision to make a most serviceable 
\ehicle. It met with decided favor. Mr. 
Davis has excellent support in Miss Mari- 
on Lang and Miss Maude Neal, to whom, 
as a "girl born in the Kentucky moun- 
tains," falls most of the dramatic work 
during the twenty-one minutes occupied. 

Henry Wood. 



• « 




Franklyn and Eva Wallace. 
A Case of Champagne." 
Gloversville, N. Y. 

Franklyn and Eva Wallace christened 
their new act entitled "A Case of Cham- 
pagne" at the Family this week. Mr. 
Wallace plays the part of a champagne 
agent and if the act is any criterion the 
wine must be of a very inferior quality. 
The only thing that saves the ship is 
Mr. Wallace's unaffected manner of hand 
ling the insipid dialogue, and he often 
draws a laugh where a less clever artist 
would wring a groan from the audience. 
Miss or Mrs. EVa Wallace makes a 
lather poor stage decoration and is sup- 
posed to feed her partner's comedy, but 
either through inability or lack of oppor- 
tunity she fails to come up to the re 
(luirements. Mr. Wallace gives a tenor 
solo number which has been killed here 
the past winter by incompetent voices 
both male and female, and so does not 
get the applause which his rendition 
should receive, Milford Mowers. 



ARTISTS WORKED HARD THEN. 

Tony Pastor's anniversary last week 
resulted in the digging up of a lot of old 
programs and among them was the 
bill of the first performance given under 
his management, which is here reproduced. 

The i>erformance was given March 21, 
18(>f>, and lists such names as Mr. Pastor 
himself and the late John Wild. A per- 
former in those days had to work hard 
for about one-tenth of the present sala- 
ries. Wild, for instance, put on two short 
farces in addition to working in the open- 
ing and afterpiece, and Mr. Pastor worked 
in two of the pieces in addition to twice 
appearing in songs. This program will 
interest many who are not familiar with 
old vaudeville. 

1865. 

TONY PASTOR'S OPERA HOUSE, 

201 Bowery, Opposite Spring Street. 

Tony Pastor Proprietor 

I'roOssor Itrnlimu leader Orchestra 

Sam' I Sharpley Huslness Manager 

PROGRAMME. 

Overture .Orchestra 

The Performance Will Commence With 

THE SECRET, OR THE HOLE IN THE WALL. 

Thomas John Wild 

Mr. iMiprcz Tony Pastor 

Mrs. Dnprei Miss Ida Duval 

Anaataata Mile. Bertha 

SHERIDAN AND MACK, 
In Bon ga and Dances. 

Comic Song — "Sarah' s Young Man ". .. Tony Pastor 

The <Jreat Sensation, 
THE NERVES, 
johnny Wild and Blanch Stanley. 

Han jo Solo James Gay tier 

The Laughable Negro Interlude, 

QUARRELSOME SERVANTS, 

Johnny Wild. James (Jayner and F. Pastor. 
Comic Songs Tony Pastor 

The Performance Concluding With 

A COMIC PANTOMIME. 

Clown, Tony Pastor Pantaloon, John Wild 

GRAND M ATI NEB ON SATURDAY. 

Doors Open at 7 o'clock, to Commence at 8 "oclock. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 

"The Artists' Forum" la for the artists exclusively. Any lust complaint any artist may 
have or conaldera he haa will he printed in thla department. Or any comment that an artist 
may dealre to make. 

Also any artist or act that disagrees with a reviewer on Variety In hla review of the artist's 
work or act may have hla criticism of the criticism printed in thla column, and It will be 
nawered by the reviewer. 

Confine your lettera to 150 words and write on one aide of paper only. 



Cincinnati, March 23, 1D00. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir : — There is a "parasite" in this west- 
ern country, a very smooth article named 
Anderson, who claims to be a newspaper 
man formerly of Boston and Rochester. 
Through an acquaintance with Manager 
McCollum of Rochester he relates a tale 
of woe that really is worthy of a better 
cause, for this Anderson is very bright and 
affable. 

The following are a partial list of his 
victims for sums ranging from .$10 to 5<> 
cents : 

Marco Twins, Edwin Stevens, Foy aud 
Chirk, Al Lawrence, Kennedy and Rooney, 
Sam Meyer (manager Elfie Fay), and 
yours truly. 

So far to my knowledge he has played 
Chicago, Indianapolis, and at this writ- 
ing is working the different shows in Cin- 
cinnati. Here Is an example of his beau- 
liful grease : 

"I am offered an appointment on the 
Cincinnati Inquirer, but must have a bond 
of $50. No one knows me hero, and if you 
will kindly let me have money enough to 
telephone to Rochester I can get my dear 
friend McCollum to fix the bond so that I 
may go to work. The long distance tele- 
phono call is $2.50 and I am broke." 

I merely notify you of this fact with 
the hope that it will be a safeguard in the 
future to the different vaudevillians who 
remain "unstung" so that they will not be 
separated from their "tainted green paper." 

William dould. 



to be a brother of Martin Beck, and writes 
under the name of Edward Boyd. Laat 
week he pulled off a big swindle in Eliza 
iH'th, N. J., under name of Meyers, lie 
uses performers' friendship as a means and 
is absolutely the best posted crook extant. 

He tried for me in Fall River and fol- 
lowed me to Lawrence, but I didn't